•  It takes as long to drive from Falmouth, on the Upper Cape, to Provincetown, at the tip of the Cape, as it does to drive from Falmouth to Boston.  In short, Cape Cod is VERY BIG.
  • Despite appearances to the contrary, there are a great many roads on Cape Cod, and it is very easy to get lost.  On the other hand, there are an incredible number of "hidden" gems off the beaten baths of routes 6, 6A and 28.  You just have to have a GPS or terrific map skills to find them.
  • The "Upper" Cape is the part nearest to the mainland, and it includes only Falmouth, Bourne, Sandwich and Mashpee.  The mid-Cape is mostly Barnstable, and everything else is "Lower Cape."  The Lower Cape is enormous: in summer it can take the better part of an hour to drive from Brewster to Provincetown.
  • The best place for salt water swimming on Cape Cod is NOT the National Seashore, where you're likely to turn blue within minutes.  Instead, it's anywhere in Buzzard's Bay -- a beautiful blue "swimming pool" that boasts fabulous sunsets and warm, clear water.
  • Kettle ponds all over Cape Cod are wonderful "swimming holes."  Many are unguarded, and offer the enormous pleasure of real, honest to goodness rope swings.  And cat fish.
  • Yes, it is possible to go hiking on Cape Cod and NOT get poison ivy.  In fact, the hiking is extraordinary, thanks to a dedicated group of conservationists.  Check out the Audubon Society lands, the rail-to-trail areas, and the many well-tended trails throughout the peninsula.  In Falmouth, the 300 Committee maintains wonderful trails at Bourne Farm (where you'll find a lake with rope swing, a lovely stream, a salt marsh, a cranberry bog AND a lovely woods), and Beebe Woods features TWO kettle ponds as well as a pasture with sheep, lambs and a "guard lama." 
  • Cape Cod is an organic farmer's dream.  There are free range chickens, goats and organic farms everywhere.  There is also a publication called "Edible Cape Cod" to steer you to the best stuff.  Come in June to pick strawberries; come in October for the pumpkins.
  • Off Cape Cod are a whole slew of islands you've never heard of, with names like Devil's Foot and Washburn.  They are pristine, and reachable only by boat.  Oh - and there's also the Vineyard and Nantucket, if you want to take public transportation.
  • People come from all over the country to retire to Cape Cod - because the music and theater scene is so wonderful.  Year round, you can see (or participate in) top notch musicals, straight plays, new plays, live concerts of all sorts.  Of course there's also dancing -- and lots of it -- if that's your bag.
  • The chowder is terrific, but the chili is even better.