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Plan Your Trip to Sedona: Best of Sedona Tourism

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Sedona, Arizona

Picture this: glowing red rocks, clear blue skies, and the most eye-popping sunsets you’ve ever seen. That’s Sedona. It's an outdoor lovers' paradise, with more than 200 trails for biking, hiking, running, and rock climbing. But it also has a spiritual side, in part due to the area's "vortexes" (energy hotspots said to have therapeutic benefits). Hike Broken Arrow Trail in the morning, then explore Uptown's metaphysical stores, boutiques, and galleries (don't miss the artisan shops at Tlaquepaque). Soothe your sore muscles at one of Sedona's spas (there’s a lot of ‘em), where treatments often involve sound baths or crystals. Nightlife is minimal, so skip last call and head to the Village of Oak Creek for some prime stargazing (the neighborhood is an International Dark Sky Place). That’s not all there is to do—find more top recs below.

Travel Advice

Essential Sedona

How to do Sedona in 3 days

Red rock hikes, art galleries, and stargazing tours
Read on

Sedona spa guide

Don’t get me wrong—the wellness resorts in my hometown of Phoenix are lovely. But when I really need a couple days of next-level self-care, I drive two hours north to Sedona. This short trek is a ritual I’ve been indulging in regularly for more than 20 years. My favorite spas in this spiritual town, known for its nature and nurture, offer world-class treatments that do wonders.
TheGlobalGlutton, Phoenix, AZ
  • L’Apothecary Spa
    5
    Set between the iconic red rocks and meandering Oak Creek, L’Auberge de Sedona is where I go for metaphysical experiences and tranquility. Its L’Apothecary Spa pampers guests with rejuvenating treatments ranging from traditional deep-tissue massages and facials to seasonal scrubs and chakra-balancing sessions. Therapists address your mind, body, and spirit through their signature essential oil scents (created at the Blending Bar) and their use of nourishing local, organic ingredients.
  • Mii amo
    713
    When it comes to destination spas in Sedona, Mii amo tops my list thanks to its recent $40 million refresh and its stunning setting—nestled into Boynton Canyon, known as one of Sedona’s vortex centers. This spa is only available to guests staying on property, so book a 3- to 10-night all-inclusive Journey with daily classes and treatments (like intuitive massages and healing sound baths), curated wellness-focused itineraries, food, and non-alcoholic beverages.
  • Ambiente Sedona A Landscape Hotel
    107
    The 2023 opening of Ambiente, a boutique property with 40 cube-shaped suites, was much-anticipated, as was its Velvet Spa—after all, the hotel owner is a former aesthetician. The intimate spa’s private treatment rooms instantly transport me to a serene place, allowing me to luxuriate in clay wraps, CBD and arnica-infused massages, or regenerative facials with potent botanicals and LED light therapy. Delve deeper with IV infusions, ear seeds, and bathing rituals.
  • Spa at Amara Resort
    42
    When I’m yearning for Sedona-centric treatments, I head straight to Amara Spa. One of the standout experiences here is the Winds of Change, which combines energy work with a massage. During this 90-minute signature treatment, your therapist will lead you through a guided meditation to balance your chakras with the help of crystals and oils, ending with a relaxing massage. Slough off rough skin with an Arizona prickly pear scrub or try a serenity gemstone facial, too.
  • A Spa for You Sedona Day Spa
    448
    Sometimes you don’t need all the frills that accompany a high-end spa, just an unforgettable treatment that hits the spot. Those are the days when I most appreciate A Spa for You Sedona Day Spa. Its unassuming environment boasts attentive staff that specializes in—wait for it!—traditional Japanese facial massage and Jin Shin Jyutsu flows that unblock and reconnect your energy points. It’s a rare gem in this region, and one that’s too often overlooked.
  • Gateway Cottage Wellness Center
    122
    Located right on the main drag in town with a beautiful red rock backdrop, Gateway Cottage Wellness Center is a hybrid spa and metaphysical gift shop (I love browsing for crystals and jewelry). Partake in therapeutic bodywork, reiki energetic healing, intuitive readings, past life regressions, hypnotherapy, and reflexology. Deep inner work can be done here, with the assistance of the dedicated and talented practitioners.
  • Sedona's New Day Spa
    845
    This is another day spa with a longstanding reputation for excellence. I always enjoy the outdoor gardens, hot tub, and fountains, before stepping into the Native American-inspired spa rituals and Southwest-focused treatments. The spa uses organic, wildcrafted, and Indigenous products for facials, massages, and body treatments. For a unique session, book the Wheel of Life gemstones reading or Southwest Steam Experience sweat lodge.

Sedona Travel Guide

Travelers' pro tips for experiencing Sedona

MaryEllenM27

Buy an America the Beautiful National Parks Pass. It works for the Grand Canyon and all of the National Monuments you may be visiting near Sedona and Grand Canyon (but not for State Parks or independently run areas like Red Rock). It also works as a Sedona Parking pass.

RedRox🏜

Don’t drive in darkness. Dark sky ordinances, absence of street lighting and vast open spaces make it darker than most people are used to. Roads are mostly two lanes, but some have little or no shoulder, so no room to swerve or pull off if you need to. And yes, lots of wildlife, as small as squirrels and skunks, and others larger than most passenger vehicles.

dbmove

Make sure you have something to put your boots in after hiking as the red dirt is crazy difficult to get out of fabrics. I also wouldn't wear my favorite pair of socks or pants in case you do slip and fall.

LovemyAcura🌵

Don't forget to bring a hat to shade your face, sunglasses, and sunscreen. While here, drink lots of water to keep hydrated in our dry heat. Turn on the oven and open the door when hot — that's what dry heat feels like! It's not wet and sticky like heat with humidity elsewhere.

Oliver

The red rocks of Sedona are truly magical.

Fred A

Red Rock State Park in Sedona is like the Grand Canyon turned inside out! Stunning views and great areas to hike.

Skeripski

Driving to Sedona you cannot avoid the beauty and awe of God. The sun changes the scenery so often you can't take pictures fast enough.

generufer

Sedona is the most beautiful spot in the whole USA and there is so much to do and see there.

What is the best way to get there?

flying

The closest international airport is Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, located about 2-hour drive away. Shuttles run to Sedona, but most visitors opt to hire a car and drive themselves. Leave yourself plenty of time, as you’ll want to stop and admire the views along the way.

Do I need a visa?

If you’re visiting the United States from overseas, use the government’s Visa Wizard to see if you need a visa.

When is the best time to visit?

Spring (March to May) or fall (Sept to Nov): The spring and fall seasons offer the best weather for hiking and outdoor activities, with highs reaching the low 80°Fs (high 20s°C). Springtime is particularly photogenic when desert flowers brighten up the red rock landscapes.

In summer, average highs sit in the 90°Fs (30s°C) and the dry heat can be uncomfortable for those unaccustomed to it. If you do visit at this time, make sure you’re prepared with suitable clothing and sun protection, as well as an umbrella—this is also monsoon season.

Get around

car

Most visitors to Sedona come to explore the natural landscapes around town and a car is essential. There are numerous rental companies in town, but most travelers find it more cost-effective to pick up their rental at the airport and save on transfer fees.

tours

Jeep tours and guided tours set out from Sedona to destinations such as the Grand Canyon, the Verde Canyon, and Antelope Canyon. If you don’t have your own transport, your only option is to join a tour.

taxis

Taxis are available for short hops, such as riding between your hotel and a restaurant, but are not a viable option for sightseeing or longer distances.

ridesharing

Uber and Lyft are available in Sedona on your smartphone, but it can be difficult to find rides and shouldn’t be relied on.

On the ground

What is the timezone?

Mountain Standard Time

What are the voltage/plug types?

The standard voltage in the United States is 120 V and the standard frequency is 60 Hz. The plug has two flat parallel pins.

What is the currency?

The U.S. dollar

Are ATMs readily accessible?

Yes, in town. Draw cash out before heading out to nearby attractions or on tours.

Are credit cards widely accepted?

Yes.

How much do I tip?

Bartender

$1-$2 a drink

Restaurant

15-20%

Bellhop

$1-$3 per bag

Housekeeper

$2-$3 per night

Taxis/rideshare

15-20%

Shuttle driver

$1-$2 per person

Tour guide

10-20%

Are there local customs I should know?

Drinking

The federal legal age for buying and drinking alcohol is 21 years old.

Driving

Arizona state laws mean that you can be issued a DUI if you are deemed to be under the influence, even if your alcohol levels are below the legal limit. The best advice: if you’re driving, don’t drink at all.

Spitting

Spitting is considered rude in any public setting.

Find more information about local customs and etiquette in the United States.

Frequently Asked Questions about Sedona

We recommend staying at one of the most popular hotels in Sedona, which include:


Sedona is known for some of its popular attractions, which include:


If you're a more budget-conscious traveler, then you may want to consider traveling to Sedona between June and August, when hotel prices are generally the lowest. Peak hotel prices generally start between March and May.