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Lord Shiva's abode

One of the best Shiva temple in Kerala. The temple is very huge and may require atleast am hour to... read more

Reviewed 2 weeks ago
ShaliniN118
via mobile
The heartline of Thrissur

Vadakkunaathan temple declared as a National Monument by India under Ancient Monuments and... read more

Reviewed 4 weeks ago
Skumar1974
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Thrissur, India
via mobile
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All reviews architectural style thrissur pooram dedicated to lord shiva mural paintings massive stone four sides national monument swaraj round heart of the city vast area main deity peaceful place inner sanctum takes place cultural capital dress code early morning
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Reviewed 2 weeks ago via mobile

One of the best Shiva temple in Kerala. The temple is very huge and may require atleast am hour to complete the darshan.
The temple is the heart of Thrissur town

Thank ShaliniN118
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 4 weeks ago via mobile

Vadakkunaathan temple declared as a National Monument by India under Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Sites and Remains Act is situated at Trichur about 50kms from Kochi International Airport. Non-Hindus are not allowed to enter into the temple.

It’s an ancient Hindu temple dedicated to Shiva popularly known as Vadakkunnathan. The temple is a classic example of the architectural style of Kerala and has four magnificent gateways called gopurams or gates facing north, south, east and west directions. The temple is surrounded by a massive stone wall enclosing an area of nearly 9 acres. The inner temple is separated from the outer temple by a broad circular granite wall enclosing a broad corridor called Chuttambalam.

The temple theatre is known as Koothambalam which is used for staging Koothu, Nangyar Koothu and Koodiyattam, an ancient ritualistic art forms of Central Kerala.

The construction of the temple was done at the time of Perumthachan. It is said that Perumthachan lived during the seventh century; so the Koothambalam may be 1,300 years old.

Maha Shivaratri is the main festival which is celebrated in the temple. Cultural and musical programmes are held in the temple premises. Around one lakh temple lamps are lighted in the festival.

One of the most colourful temple festivals of Kerala, Thrissur Pooram is conducted in the temple premises. Lakhs of people assemble to watch the display of caparisons and the fireworks that follows.

1  Thank Skumar1974
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 4 weeks ago

Vadakkunnathan Temple is an ancient Hindu temple dedicated to Shiva at city of Thrissur, of Kerala state in India. This temple is a classic example of the architectural style of Kerala and has monumental towers on all four sides . The temple ground host the famous Thrissur Pooram festival

Thank Rajesh_RT
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed October 2, 2018

I liked the peaceful ambiance of the place. It is too soothing for us to spend the time at this location.

Thank UnmeshN2
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed September 29, 2018

This was our last destination in city sightseeing in Trissur. Vadakkunnathan Temple is an ancient temple dedicated to Lord Shiva. Temple is spread-out in a huge ground. Vadakkunnathan temple is a classic example of the architectural style of Kerala. We see monumental towers on all four sides. According to popular local lore, this is the first temple built by Parasurama, the sixth avatar of Vishnu. Do visit if u r devotee of Lord Shiva.

Thank JAGDISHJAGDISH
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed September 4, 2018

This is one place you can choose to be all by yourself or with the crowd or with the Lord. There is a prescribed (viddhiprakaaram) route for walking in the temple, local devotees are most helpful to the ignorant. Walk during the daytime, preferably before 10 am, as the stones can get warm to the naked feet, and the visual treats can be soaked in with good sunlight.The evening ceremony beginning at 8 pm and lasting for about 20 minutes has a small gathering of mostly local devotees who know the rituals and the chants. Join along or just be a silent witness. Eitherways, you will be enriched.

Thank catNorway
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed September 1, 2018 via mobile

India has got so much of ancient history that it's not possible to fathom the grandeur of the materialism combined with spirituality ,at least in this day and age dedicated mainly to making money and more money . So many wonderful temples with unique architecture and powerful vibes . Lord Vadakkumnathan temple in Thrissur is superb . Spread over 8-9 acres and renovated to perfection by the ASI , one of the most beautiful and well maintained temples in India . Historically , it's not known when it was built but a guessestimate could be around 3000 years back . It's said that Adi Shankaracharya was born because of blessings of the Lord ,there is a beautiful Adi Shankaracharya staue just outside the temple . The temple is built in typical Kerala style architecture with slanted arches . A circular shape ensconces the main temple with paintings on the walls ,depicting Mahabharata tales . The lingam ,they say is actually not visible because of layers of ghee built since centuries and the ghee never goes stale . Amazing . There are temples of Goddess Parvathy , Lord Ganeaha , etc too withing the temple premises. Dress code for men ,lungi with bare torso . Also there are specific times for opening and closing of darahanas . So ,one might have to wait for 30-45 minutes depending on the time he/ she lands there

Thank vipina776
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed August 31, 2018

The ancient Vadakumnatham Temple is the main attraction—religious and tourist—in Thrissur, and rightly so: this ancient temple complex, where Shiv is the reigning deity (though there are lots of other deities around, too, each with his/her own shrine), is a heritage monument that’s protected by the Archaeological Survey of India.

I was taken around the temple complex by the husband of a friend of mine. He belongs to Thrissur, so had some interesting anecdotes to share about various parts of the complex.

There is no entrance fee for the complex, but you do need to leave your footwear at the stand outside the temple (on the left of the main entrance), where a nominal fee is charged. Whether or not you choose to leave donations at any of the shrines is up to you.

Nobody is certain about the age of the temple, which is believed to be thousands of years old. It is believed too, that Adi Sankara stayed here and attained ‘freedom from embodiment’ here.

The main shrine, in the centre, houses Shiv himself, in the form of a monolithic shivlinga. The outside of this temple is decorated with beautiful old wall paintings, and around the back of this is the temple to Shiv’s consort, Parvati. Within the same complex—the sanctum sanctorum—are a couple of other shrines too, including one to Rama and (surprisingly) one to Vishnu. Note that photography is prohibited in this part of the temple complex, though you may take photos outside.

On the grounds outside, surrounded by trees, gardens, paths and more, are some very interesting shrines and structures and other spots. There is, for instance, a small shrine to Parashuram, one to yakshis, and one dedicated to snakes (this is next to a beautiful pink-flowering crepe myrtle tree, and on the evening I visited, the three idols of snakes here were all garlanded with the pink flowers).

There is a shrine to Adi Sankara, to Ganesh, and one to Kumbhakarna (this is a small and very striking shrine, its gopuram decorated with what looked to me like a pinkish brass, with rearing cobra heads at the corner). My friend’s husband told me that as a child, when he used to visit this shrine with other children, they would make sure to be very quiet while tiptoeing halfway around it (you can’t even go all around it; that’s considered inauspicious, so the temple authorities have actually roped off the other part so that you are forced to turn around and go back the way you came). Then, as they left the shrine, they would call really hard, to wake up Kumbhakarna! That was fun, and even as we stepped out of the shrine, we heard someone clap loudly behind us.

Another interesting local tradition is linked to the shrine of Simhodara. Just beyond this, you’ll find a small pedestal-like structure, atop which people pile up little pebbles picked up from the surrounding ground. Pick up one, place it on the pile, then immediately turn around and go back without looking back—because it is believed that if you look back, you will be turned to stone!

Also of interest is a little patch of grassy ground called Vyasashila. This is opposite a large tree (which stands near one of the large ‘pooram’ gates through which fabulously caparisoned elephants enter when the magnificent annual Pooram festival is held in May). While the tree is beautiful and so is the gate, there’s a myth attached to the Vyasashila patch. It’s said that when Hanuman went to the Himalayas to fetch the sanjeevani herb to heal the wounded Lakshman, he paused here, and some of the herb dropped here. Also, that Vyasa (who wrote the Ramayana) rested here. So, according to the latter myth, if you eat even a little blade of the grass growing here, you will attain some of the knowledge of Vyasa himself.

If all this religion and mythology isn’t enough for you and you want some natural beauty, head outside the temple grounds—it’s pretty much surrounded by teak trees (these are fairly young saplings, recently planted to replace a grove which was cut down years ago). It’s green and beautiful.

Definitely worth visiting if you’re anywhere near Thrissur.

Thank MadhulikaL4
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed August 10, 2018

Vadakkunnathan temple is one of the ancient hindu temple in Thrissur, Kerala. The main deity is Lord Shiva. Thrissur Pooram festival is held in this temple.

Thank AnanthJay
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed August 6, 2018

in the heart of thrissur city. you will find peace calm and happiness here because the quite atmosphere.

Thank jubinb2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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