We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.
Save
Review Highlights
Great place for photography!

We love going to Big Talbot Island state Park. It's a different kind of beach experience. Our... read more

Reviewed 5 days ago
10Annie10
,
Jacksonville, Florida
Nature overload!

We stopped here briefly to do some birding and sightseeing as we drove through the area. There are... read more

Reviewed 1 week ago
lowens311
,
Kansas City, Missouri
via mobile
Read all 235 reviews
  
Top Selling Tours & Activities in and around Jacksonville
Reviews (235)
Filter reviews
235 results
Traveler rating
168
55
11
1
0
Traveler type
Time of year
LanguageAll languages
More languages
168
55
11
1
0
Show reviews that mention
All reviews boneyard beach low tide dead trees black rock talbot island climb down honor system bone yard beach great place to take pictures beautiful beach bike trail picnic area beach access natural florida great trails great fishing hidden treasure
Filter
Updating list...
229 - 234 of 235 reviews
Reviewed November 23, 2010

Big Talbot State Park is located just south of Amelia Island with A1A bisecting the park. To the south of Big Talbot is the more developed Little Talbot State Park. There are several access points for Big Talbot. At the northern end, .5 mile south of the Nassau Sound Bridge, is the main access complete with solar powered latrine, picnic tables, hiking trails through the forest or down to the beach. There is a $2 admission fee to this access point payable through the envelope system. The beach trail meanders through the maritime forest down to the beach. When you reach the beach, you are overlooking Nassau Sound and the southern end of Amelia Island. Out to the east in the Sound is Bird Island, named as it serves as a nesting ground for least terns, gullsand other birds. Walk to the north and you will find typical, hard packed sandy beach. Walk to the south and you will begin to encounter large trees that have been eroded from the bluff and strippedof their bark by water, wind and sun.

Another mile south of the first access is the Black Rock Trail. Visited primarily by locals, it offers some unique beach vistas as well as quiet and solitude. Park on the side of the road on the wide shoulder and walk 1/3 mile down the access road to the beach. Due to heavy erosion into the bluff, the park has had to install a sturdy 8' wooden ladder down to the beach. Walk to the north and you will encounter one deadfall after another for about 100 yards. Quite a dramatic appearance, but also dangerous if there is an unusually high tide pushing the water up to the edge of the bluff. Walk to the south and you will have to walk around deadfall for about 25 yards and after you cross the point, the beach will widen considerably and you will see the expansive white sand that winds downs all the way to Simpson Creek (which separates Big and Little Talbot). There is no fee for the use of this trail.

The third trail is Big Pine and is located another mile or so south on the east side of the road. This trail goes through the forest and ends at a marsh viewpoint, not the beach. Again, no fee for using this trail, but there are no facilities.

26  Thank dlwinger
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed June 5, 2018 via mobile
Google Translation

This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed October 28, 2017
Google Translation

This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed December 19, 2016
Google Translation

This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed February 3, 2016
Google Translation

This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
View more reviews