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Review Highlights
One of our favorite hikes!

On our 2 week vacation to Sequim, we frequented this place, not once but twice. The approximate... read more

Reviewed 6 days ago
Lori L
,
Estero, Florida
Whats a SPIT?

Its a strip of land that sticks out into the ocean, this one is 5 miles long and about 100 feet... read more

Reviewed 6 days ago
wgh57
,
Simi Valley, California
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All reviews light house dungeness low tide wildlife refuge half mile parking lot long hike mile hike wonderful walk vancouver island national park pass natural wonder tide charts tide schedule spit of land paved path beautiful beach
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Reviewed 6 days ago

On our 2 week vacation to Sequim, we frequented this place, not once but twice. The approximate mile hike to the beach was nothing compared to where we ended up - on the beach. Absolutely breathtaking! There's even a viewing area before heading down to the beach where you can temporarily relax and take some great photos. When you head back to the park entrance, take the Primitve Trail through the woods, it's slightly longer, but it's so surreal and the nature is there just for the observing. Hopefully, we'll be moving to the area and I know this will be one of our weekly stops when we retire!

Thank Lori L
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 6 days ago

Its a strip of land that sticks out into the ocean, this one is 5 miles long and about 100 feet wide. At high tide it almost disapears, you need to check the tide charts before you go out. It is worth going to, you could spend most of the day there.

Thank wgh57
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

This was a lovely park. It was free National Park day when we went, otherwise to walk down to the spit its a couple of bucks.

Thank victoriawadebcac
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 2 weeks ago

The spit of land and the old lighthouse are central to the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge (DNWR). The spit was formed from the prevailing wind and wave action that erodes the 115 foot high bluff made from the deposits left by several ice ages. This wind and wave action is ongoing, so a phenomena of the spit is that it grows in length, on average, 13-15 feet in length every year. The deposits are a half mile deep here and originated on the western side of the Canadian Rockies. Deposits are left on a shallow marine shelf forming the longest spit of land in the U.S. The lighthouse went into operation in 1857. It has operated continuously since and hikers may tour the grounds, the house and the light everyday of the year. Since the spit is growing, the lighthouse which was at the end of the spit originally is now a half mile from the end. Hikers need to follow NOAA tide charts to look preferably for midday low tides. The low tide condition affords ample clear beach for easy walking. High tides may mean walking amongst softball size or larger rocks near the debris field (logs left from storms). The lighthouse is open daily 9-5, (approximately) and staffed by volunteers (they stay for a week long shift) that give tours and interpretive talks. The light itself is owned by the U.S Coast Guard and the volunteers only need to advise the Coast Guard if it malfunctions.
The entrance to the DNWR, a federal jurisdiction, is adjacent to the Clallam County campground. This close proximity causes confusion for the required fee. The campground is a separate facility which is free for day use, but requires a fee for overnight use. The DNWR has a modest fee of $3 for up to four adults with children free. Parking is available in the county parking lot and is free. National Parks passes afford free entry as well as other passes like a current Duck Stamp. State park passes do not qualify for entry, though. On weekdays from 8-5 park passes can be purchased in the DNWR office located 100 yards from the entry kiosk and pay station.
Getting back to the DNWR experience, interpretive information is located at the entry kiosk. Volunteers are present to assist with directions and some offer explanations of what to expect. They do not as a rule have change for the entry fee, though. They will advise of restrictions for dogs, running, loud noise (no radios allowed), no fire or wood gathering is allowed in the DNWR, no jogging, no collecting rocks, and first and foremost it is a wildlife refuge. So, preservation of habitat is important and care of species present is the goal. For example, during the summer months seals give birth in the refuge and pups can be seen on the spit. The seals and pups are to be given a wide berth, stay at least 100 yards away, and visitors in general must stay on the side of the spit nearest the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Marine shipping is commonly seen as well as sea otters, seal, various water fowl and occasionally whales (three varieties are present in these waters - minke, grey and orca).
Local schools and various youth organizations visit the DNWR regularly. Visitors from around the world also venture to the spit. It is a commonly used hiking place of locals. Some people that live nearby walk the spit, at least partially, every day. The "Friends of the DNWR" are attempting to acquire funding to enable an interpretive APP to be developed for smart phones which would enhance the experience and give educational value through a scavenger hunt scenario.
From the kiosk and pay station hikers start by walking approximately a half mile on a relatively level and well maintained trail through woods with a variety of species (literature at the kiosk is available for identify flora and fauna). Two overlooks afford more detailed information and the lower overlook especially has splendid views of the lighthouse, the San Juan Islands, Strait of Georgia, Vancouver Island (Canadian) and Victoria, BC. Blue Herons, Bald Eagles, Cedar Waxwings and other birds can often be seen here. Rarely the spectacular volcano, Mt. Baker, can be seem in almost perfect alignment with the lighthouse. From this vantage point the lighthouse is five miles away and M. Baker is 85 miles distant. Mt. Baker lies just south of the U.S.-Canada border, is in the Cascade Range, and receives about 500 inches of snow yearly. So, when it is visible it is snow covered yearly.
From the lower overlook the trail descends to the beach. At the bottom hikers may go westward along the bluff to McDonald Creek, approximately less than a mile. To the right the beach is the way to reach the lighthouse. Mile markers remind hikers that it lies five miles away and takes approximately 5hours to make the round trip. Water and food should be packed in and trash carried out. Water and lavatories are available at the lighthouse. Hikers need to know the county provides a lavatory adjacent to the parking lot, but no facilities are available before reaching the lighthouse. Interestingly the water pumped up at the lighthouse comes from an aquifer 600 feet below the spit that conveys water that originated as snow high up in the Olympic Mountains eons ago. A picnic bench is available for hikers to use for a lunch break.
Visitors from far and wide and the surrounding area love this place.

Thank Martin G
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 3 weeks ago

This is one of the most stunning places I’ve visited; it’s unlike anyplace else. If you’ve seen where it’s located on a map and seen pictures, you know it’s going to be unique. I’m 73 years old and it was a good hike down to the spit, but it was beautiful and well worth the hike down as well as back up. There are plenty of places to stop and rest and enjoy the view. I would recommend bringing a walking stick if you are so inclined. The driftlogs, the wildlife, the views, the sounds are all wonderful. The ranger on duty told us if we wanted to make the hike out to the lighthouse (about 4.5 miles each way), it would be best to do it at a negative tide. I am not actually up for a nine mile hike, but there was a time when I would’ve wanted to do it...if you can, you should do it.

Thank janicegritz
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 4 weeks ago via mobile

What a day we had in mid-October. We did the 5.5 mile hike out to the lighthouse and returned (11 miles total). Make sure you heed the advise on the tides. 2 1/12 hours out, 45 minutes at the lighthouse, and 1 3/4 hours back. Must be one of the best hikes in the USA. Enjoy and take a snack!!!!

Thank Mark H
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed October 8, 2018 via mobile

The DUNGENESS Spit is 5 miles long and has a lighthouse on the end. You need to visit when the tide is low is be able to walk to the end. The hike down is also short but downhill part way so remember you have to hike back up but not steep. I enjoyed seeing something like this because Pennsylvania has nothing like it. If you have time it da worth seeing.

Thank letsdotravel
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed October 5, 2018

Our family goes to Dungeness every time we visit the Sequim/Port Angeles area. You can walk along the shore, skip rocks, build sand castles, or look for wildlife (harbor seals, bald eagles, sea lions). Just a wonderful place to sit on a log and gaze out into the water, and rejuvenate your mind, body and soul.

1  Thank Mary C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed October 3, 2018 via mobile

We didn’t walk far due to our age group and time constraints. There are a ton of pretty rocks to look at and pick up. At the time we visited, the waves were gentle so kids could dip their feet in.

There are toilets up near the parking lot. The path to to beach takes about 15 minutes. Tide schedule is posted.

Thank SeesTheWorld5
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed September 19, 2018

Always a flying visit and so want to spend a lot more time here. small charge to enter but goes towards the upkeep. Have always seen wildlife whenever I have been there this visit 2 deer's one just stood wtaching me watching him

Thank Julie L
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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