We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.
Review Highlights
A grand house decorated in Victorian gothic style

This is one of those Victorian houses which went well over the top in looking back to the gothic... read more

Reviewed 6 days ago
David B
,
El Barco de Avila, Spain
Relaxing few hours

Such an interesting place. Beautiful grounds. Knowledgable and approachable volunteers who knew... read more

Reviewed 6 days ago
Kate_Maxwell
,
Lymington
via mobile
Read all 882 reviews
  
Reviews (882)
Filter reviews
882 results
Traveler rating
526
286
55
9
6
Traveler type
Time of year
LanguageAll languages
More languages
Traveler rating
526
286
55
9
6
Show reviews that mention
All reviews national trust walled garden interesting house formal gardens the kitchen visited knightshayes nt properties well worth a visit gothic revival william burges stable block lovely grounds stables cafe extensive grounds room guides old house for sale
Selected filters
Filter
Updating list...
12 - 17 of 882 reviews
Reviewed April 19, 2019

Not taken with the inside....way over the top for me; but the gardens and grounds are delightful. Plenty of space for children to race around and enjoy the fresh air/ rolly-polly...enjoyed the food too - a pork ciabatta.

All in all a breath of fresh air.

Date of experience: April 2019
Thank ArmenianJames
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed April 18, 2019

Knightshayes is a National Trust property with lovely gardens, tearoom, shop and the interior is quite unique. Certainly a must-see if you are in the area - even if you are not a Victorian House fan!

Date of experience: April 2019
Thank hhm501
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed April 13, 2019

John Heathcoat brought the bobbin net machine and took over a woolen mill in Tiverton, he brought* workers from Loughborough and built houses for his workers and funded the construction of a new school in the town. But before you listen to the National Trust volunteers present him as a paragon of employment in the early 1800s whose workers followed* him when he moved to Devon, (* = They walked!) it's worth remembering he was already re-locating to Tiverton when the Luddites attacked and destroyed machines and stock in Loughborough. He wrote to the Mayor of Tiverton, asking for protection for the mill there, and in the letter disclosed: "I have great apprehension of an immediate attack at this place also. In fact I believe the real cause of this mischief being done is principally, if not wholly, owing to the offence of removing here, and I have been informed upon undoubted authority that the Nottingham Lace Makers have sworn my entire destruction".
His grandson, Sir John Heathcoat Amory, built Knightshayes Court to flaunt the family wealth, goes the story, employing William Burges to build a Victorian Gothic masterpiece. He was sacked halfway through and next up was John Dibblee Crace, a less flamboyant designer, who completed the interior, only for it to be covered up by the family after they moved in. The formal gardens were originally designed by Edward Kemp (1817-1891), a reputable landscape gardener and with the lovely walled gardens this would later be the highlight for the last member of the family to live in the house, Joyce Wethered. She was both a respected gardener and a world championship golfer, winning the English ladies title four times.
After falling into disrepair and becoming a USAAF rest home for the American Air Force, in 1944, it was acquired by the National Trust in 1972 and has been restored to a sort of "what might have been" state since then. Originally thought of as "irrelevant except as part of the setting in the garden." even by the Secretary of the National Trust at the time, it is truly something to behold now. Pictures don't do it justice and the only qualms I had about our trip there was the lack of somewhere to sit amongst all those VERY comfy looking chairs and the official history being somewhat disingenuous about the grandfather and blaming all on the grandson, who might have been someone who enjoyed killing stags, was a politician, and built the house on a hill overlooking his factory so he could keep an eye on it, but the fruit did not fall far from the tree. The gardens, though, they're so good and they are kept so well and everyone we met in them was happy to stop and talk about their work and discuss planting or the different varieties. I heard the head gardener is currently Jessica Evans, who has previously worked on Gardener's World, but I don't think we met her, could've, but I don't think so. Take a separate camera, it'll eat your phone's battery on a lovely Spring day like it was on Thursday.

Date of experience: April 2019
Thank edlserna
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed April 11, 2019 via mobile

Despite being April the gardens were full. Mainly tulips. House was interesting but not my taste. Children were loving it. Food could have been better.

Date of experience: April 2019
Thank Y3727DHjennyb
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed April 11, 2019 via mobile

Although busy because of Easter school holidays my friends & I really enjoyed our visit and the formal gardens, pool garden and woodlands were all amazing. Loved seeing the huge moths sculptures in the trees.

Date of experience: April 2019
Thank DevonArtist
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
View more reviews