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“Worth going out of the way”

Hampton Plantation State Historic Site
Ranked #3 of 31 things to do in Georgetown
Certificate of Excellence
Attraction details
Reviewed May 15, 2014

Arrived at end of day, nobody there and walked around the grounds...really felt like stepping back in time. We had missed the 2:00 tour but the Ranger on staff was more than delighted to give us a personal tour inside the house ($7ea). He did a great job filling us in on the history of the house including the construction techniques that have allowed the building to survive earthquakes and hurricanes. Noted that some of the window panes date back to 1700s and early 1800s...he explained how to tell the difference. The grand oak, saved by George Washington was very impressive as well as the listing of slaves and their value.

He was raised in the area and had a lot of passion for the place and was able to fill us in on local nature elements as well, chiggers, ticks, mosquitoes, snakes, etc.. He catches venomous snakes and wrestles alligators...letting both go, just a sport. We live in the Seattle area and toured a number of Antebellum Plantations, some fancier, but the Ranger made this a trip a highlight.

Mosquitoes and chiggers were present but not too bad...just put fingernail polish on the bites, so not a big deal.

2  Thank experienced300
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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101 - 105 of 152 reviews

Reviewed April 15, 2014

Very much enjoyed the guided tour of the manor on the plantation. Am grateful to George Washington for having visited and spared a beautiful oak tree that still stands during his visit. Most interesting to learn of the history of rice production during the time there were slaves. Fascinating to learn about and see the evolution of the construction of the estate. Beautiful flowering dogwoods, azaleas and numerous other plants add to the outdoor splendor at this time of year.

1  Thank Louis D
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed April 7, 2014

Walking around the grounds is so peaceful and beautiful. You can only imagine what it was like back in the day. The rangers that gave the tour were very knowledgeable and completed the picture of life back then. We were told of a church nearby that was built in the same era (1700s) and it was worth finding it ..... words can not describe what a neat place it is (and was during it's time). Great place to visit!

1  Thank Cora C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 24, 2014

This old plantation is an absolutely lovely find! Wandering around this historic site, you can almost imagine what it looked like 250 years ago when it was a running rice plantation. There are signs on the trails that give informative information. . There is also an eerie feeling as you walk through the area remembering the lives no doubt lost on this property and the toil and suffering that occured.
They have a tour of the house in the afternoon, and like others state, no furnishings. But the structures leave much to your imagination even if you do not take the tour. The ranger is available to talk in the building for him where you park. For birders, there are wild turkey in the fall, and woodpeckers on the long dirt ride into the plantation. We ate a picnic lunch and saw a hermit thrush while we enjoyed our lunch. You can walk back to the dock area, but the ranger suggested staying on the trails due to snakes. Not a place for children I believe. More a place for a quiet stroll.

1  Thank SeeourUSA
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 23, 2014

If this is a first stop in your adventure in South Carolina's past, you might want to start elsewhere. That's not a knock on the grounds, the Park Rangers or the home itself. The location is quiet and peaceful now and the Docent/Ranger makes the point that this was probably a noisy bustling place 200+ years ago with its owners and the approximately 130-150 enslaved rice workers and craftsmen. My caution is because though the home is interesting for its structural details, there are no furnishings and little beyond a cook house built in the 1800's on the site of what was thought to be 3 previous ones. There is a trail that allows you to see details of how a rice field on these tidal creeks and rivers worked and the docent/Ranger we had seemed well informed and was ready to answer most questions. This is a place to see after you've visited a Charleston house of the plantation owner class, or one of the furnished plantations in the area to get a better view of the elegance of the life many of these planters
led. Then come and see how they made the money that furnished that lifestyle, where they lived when they weren't "in town" and how those people enslaved here must have suffered working in a swamp up to their knees in stagnant water that had its complement of snakes, gators, and mosquitoes.

Thank David R
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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