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This was my second visit to the Cliff Dwellings and found that there is more museum information in... read more

Reviewed 6 days ago
JEBH_200
,
Colorado Springs, Colorado
via mobile
Wonderful experience for all ages!

The views are amazing and it's wonderful to take a step back in time! The site may have been... read more

Reviewed 6 days ago
fahtyh12018
,
Ohio
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All reviews gift shop native americans small museum original location interesting place self guided tour new mexico interesting history colorado springs walk around little pricey pikes peak anasazi pueblo indian wolves artifacts
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Reviewed 6 days ago via mobile

This was my second visit to the Cliff Dwellings and found that there is more museum information in the gift shop area. And the gift shop seems to go on forever... if you need local items or post cards this is a good shopping spot. The dwellings are very interesting and it’s wonderful to be able to walk inside to get an idea of life. I appreciated the informative plaques.

Thank JEBH_200
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 6 days ago

The views are amazing and it's wonderful to take a step back in time! The site may have been moved, but it does not take away from the experience at all. There are explanations along the way for what rooms were used for making it a great educational experience for the kids. The museum and gift shops are wonderful as well!

Thank fahtyh12018
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

We really enjoyed our visit here! I saw a few reviews complaining about the site not being the original, which we didn't even know after going through the whole exhibit, so I guess they don't highlight that part too much. Whatever though - it's cool to walk through the ruins and imagine how the Puebloans would have lived. The museum is small, but has some really cool artifacts. For only $10 a person, we thought it was worth a visit!

Thank whistory
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

The entire 40 room cliff dwelling site is right next to the parking lot — there is no hiking needed to reach this amazing ancient community complex.

Our visit began inside the three-story Pueblo-style building that houses the museum and gift shop. The building represents the architecture of the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico, descendants of the Cliff Dwelling Indians belonging to the Anasazi cultural line.

The Anasazi Museum features exhibits of tools, pottery, and weapons, dioramas depicting daily life, and informative videos about the mysterious people who left a remarkable architectural legacy in cliff walls like the one at Manitou Cliff Dwellings.

The Manitou Cliff Dwellings is an Archeological and Natural History Preserve comprised of preserved Anasazi Ruins that are 800 to 1000 years old. These alcoves and rooms in the cliff provided the Anasazi shelter from wind, rain, and snow. They are some of the most accessible cliff dwellings that still exist today.

This site was relocated from McElmo Canyon in southern Colorado in the early 1900s to protect the ancient Anasazi architecture from vandalism and treasure hunters. The authentic cliff dwellings were first opened to the public in 1907 to allow visitors the opportunity to get a glimpse of what life was like for the indigenous peoples of the region.

Exploring the Cliff Dwellings is a self-guided experience and what makes it really unique is that nothing but the spiritual kiva is fenced off.

At the Manitou Cliff Dwellings, you’re encouraged to explore and touch to your heart’s content. They actually encourage you (if you can fit) to climb through the small window openings to see just how small the rooms were. We also were able to climb a ladder into a second-story room, them climb out a window into a balcony and down another ladder to experience how the Anasazi entered and exited rooms and buildings.

Thank jennifer5370
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

The first thing everyone should be aware of is that this is not the original site of the dwellings. They were moved to this location. If you want something that is in situ, these cliff dwellings aren't for you. That being said, it was fun to be able to walk into the rooms and see how ancient people lived. The museum area is very nicely done, and the gift shop is excellent. If you need souvenirs or gifts, the gift shop here is an excellent choice. If it wasn't for the gift shop, I would give it 3 stars, because it is a little overpriced for the time spent.

Thank Easytravels53449
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

For the money paid, there really isn't that much to do or see... We walked through the dwellings, with 2 kids, and stopped and read every sign and watched every detail. It took us less than 25 minutes to go from beginning to end....
There's a museum that's pretty interesting and a gift shop, but nothing to really write home about.
I think the highlight for the kids was the old time horse machine... Or perhaps we are just culturally challenged hehe...

Thank Jennefer P
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago via mobile

Have visited Manitou ten times and never stopped at this attraction-a Big Mistake!!

Great diversion for kids and old alike-cheap entrance and about and hour of your time on the dwellings (you get to walk in and around them) and about a half hour for the Gift Shop (it was amazing with so much to see and buy!)

Enjoy the place and enjoy your trip!

Thank ArmyPike
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

The Manitou Cliff Dwellings in Manitou Springs, Colorado, near Colorado Springs, are comprised of ancient Anasazi ruins that date back 800 to 1,000 years. That fact alone makes this an interesting attraction for anyone with a mind for history and a desire to learn about Native American culture. Located conveniently on U.S. Highway 24, the Manitou Cliff Dwellings area group of relocated Anasazi ruins from the Four Corners area of the southwestern United States. The Anasazi didn't live in the Manitou Springs area but lived and roamed the Four Corners area from 1200 BC to 1300 AD. The Anasazi Museum was established and the cliff dwellings reconstructed here in 1904 and opened to the public in 1907. The museum features displays about the lives of the ancient Anasazi, including exhibits of archaeological artifacts, tools, pottery and weapons. Visitors also can walk through the ancient-style ruins outside. The stones were taken from a collapsed Anasazi site near Cortez, Colorado, shipped by railroad to Manitou Springs and assembled in their present form as Anasazi-style buildings closely resembling those found in the Four Corners. The creation of the Manitou Cliff Dwellings Museum and Preserve was the vision of Virginia McClurg and Harold Ashenhurst. It was undertaken to create a museum that preserves and protects the fine stonework architecture of the southwestern Indians, which at that time, in the early 1900s, were unprotected from vandals and artifact hunters. The impact of these careless people threatened to wipe out the great architectural achievements of the Anasazi Indians. For example, the three-story pueblo structure at Manitou Springs demonstrates the architecture of the Taos Pueblo Indians of New Mexico. They are descendants of the Cliff Dwelling Indians belonging to the Anasazi cultural line. This pueblo building was erected at the turn of the century and home to a Native America family of dancers who entertained the tourists for several generations. They lived in the pueblo as late as 1984. Over the years, the pueblo was expanded into a museum of pottery and artifacts. It has since been expanded to include a souvenir shop that offers Native American pottery, jewelry and artifacts.

Thank Taylor B
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Kokopelli1906, Manager at Manitou Cliff Dwellings, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you for visiting us and for your support. We are pleased you enjoyed your time here, marveling at the lives of the ancient Anasazi and how remarkable of a culture they were.

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This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

Tourist trap and rip-off are the first words that come to mind. The cliff dwellings are not original, they were stolen from their original location somewhere in the Four Corners area and rebuilt here. No respect for the people who built them or their descendants.

You basically pay a lot of money to see a copy and to enter a gift shop where you can spend even more money.

If you want to see the real thing, go to Mesa Verde.

Thank Raven25Blue
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Kokopelli1906, Manager at Manitou Cliff Dwellings, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

We are sorry to hear you did not enjoy your visit and are misinformed regarding our history. The relocation and preservation of our ruins was accomplished over 110 years ago in an effort to preserve and protect them from pot hunters and vandals that were destroying many of the Native American sites across the southwest as it was a time when the Federal Government did not help to protect any of these sites. A local group of professors, archaeologists, and entrepreneurs wanted to change this and help protect the Native American history. The same group that established our museum and preserve eventually got congress to pass the antiquities act to protect all Native American sites as well as accomplished getting Mesa Verde established as a National Park. We have nothing but respect for the Ancestral Puebloans and are pleased to help people understand and learn about their amazing culture. Our Pueblo building houses several museums each containing pottery, artifacts, and cultural displays, all providing a hands on history out of respect for our ancestors. We offer school field trips daily in the Fall and Spring to help educate our students on this culture and help them appreciate their history.

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Reviewed 2 weeks ago

There are a few different things to do/see here. You can go through the actual cliff dwellings, visit 2 museums in the adjacent Pueblo, and visit the gift shop. This place would be great for a school field trip if you are located near Colorado Springs...there is a lot of interesting and informative experiences at the site. I went with my family...my only complaint was that when we went through actual cliff dwellings, you just walk through on your own and read the signs...I felt like there should have been a guide, or at least someone in/near the dwellings to answer questions and give additional information (maybe there was, and I just didn't notice them). Either way, very cool and definitely worth visiting if you are in Manitou Springs.

Thank Icarus4335
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Kokopelli1906, Manager at Manitou Cliff Dwellings, responded to this reviewResponded 2 weeks ago

Thank you for sharing your visit with us and we are pleased you enjoyed your visit. We do offer guided tours, but only for school groups in the Fall and Spring. We do not do any tours through the summer months as we tend to get pretty busy and there is not enough room to bring a group through comfortably. There are informative plaques in each dwelling as well as an audio tour using your tablet or smartphone. In addition, there are several staff members around the grounds and gift shop that are happy to answer any questions you may have, we are sorry you missed seeing one of them. Thanks for sharing your visit with us.

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This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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