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Reviewed December 19, 2010

My wife, my son, his girlfriend and I visited Siem Reap for a week in early November and had a fantastic experience. And I have to say the day we visited the floating village of Kampong Phluk was the best. First of all we were fortunate enough to hire an English speaking tuk tuk driver named Bun Han aka "Lucky" on our first day arriving in Siem Reap. Lucky was born and raised in the next village up the Roluos River from Kampong Phluk called Phumi Roluos Chas. As we had developed a friendship with Lucky he gave us the inside scoop on everything. As our son and his girlfriend are teachers, Lucky suggested we stop and visit the school while we were in Kampong Phluk AND stopped in his village of Phumi Roluos Chas at the very interesting morning market and brought us to the seller of school supplies where because of his assistance we paid the actual Cambodian price for school supplies instead of the Foreigner price offered by young women outside the school.

Tickets to get there were $15 each and well worth it. As we approached the village on the boat we were astounded by the uniqueness and the natural beauty surrounding us. Chicken coops and pig pens built on stilts and floating pontoons. All the homes were built on stilts, and most had decks outfitted with container gardens with Lemon grass, herbs, vegetables and ornamental flowers. As we floated slowly by the village, we observed everyday life going on. Young children in small canoe like boats paddled past us and smiled broadly. Women with small boats filled with fruits and vegetables docked outside their homes carrying their groceries up the simple steps into their kitchens. We noticed a woman wrapped in a towel shampooing her hair on her deck and rinsing her hair by dipping a vessel into large earthen pots filled with collected rain water. Outside at water level surrounding nearly every home we noticed floating plants kept close at hand with nearly invisible nylon netting. Lucky told us those were morning glory plants and were used as food. As we entered into the center of town we decided to pay $5 each to transfer into smaller paddle boats and toured the beautiful forest which was all around the village. The trees grew submerged in the fresh water and resembled larger versions of the Mangroves one sees when visiting tropical places near the oceans, but Mangroves grow in Salt water while these trees grew in the Fresh water of the Tonle Sap lake. Lucky told me they were called "Raina" Trees. After wards we stopped and visited the center of the village. Which in early November was the only part of the village which was not underwater. In the center was a Buddhist Pagoda, a restaurant and the school. I have never seen such enthusiastic students. The teacher was having the 2 students at a time come up to the blackboard and compete to see who could correctly spell a word. It was as if I was attending a horse race and as the students came closer to "home stretch" in spelling the word correctly, the louder the cheering from the students came. I was impressed and even more delighted with our decision to bring with us school supplies to hand out. to these deserving students.

After our morning in Kampong Phluk, Lucky had a special treat for us. He had arraigned for his Mother to prepare lunch for us in her home only a few miles away in the next village of Phumi Roluos Chas. We felt honored to be invited into their home and experience a glimpse of actual Cambodian everyday life. As we arrived a dozen young children came running from neighboring homes as it became apparent all Lucky's neighbors knew we were coming. We sat on the floor in the middle of the one room home. Lucky's mother and father were there preparing and serving the meal and the neighboring children all gathered at the door and stared in with innocent curiosity. The meal was Fresh Tonle Sap fish fried over a wood fire in the corner of the home and served with a sweet yet sour sauce and complimented with a cucumber salad and fresh local greens. A perfect ending of a wonderful visit to the floating village of Kampong Phluk.

I have Lucky's e-mail address, and can't recommend him high enough, so if anyone would like to reach him please feel free to contact me and I will forward his address

71  Thank ScottSkog
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed February 3, 2010

When we visited, the water level was high, reaching near the floor level of most houses. It was fun to sit in our boat passing by tree tops, palm huts many bedecked with flowers, floating pig pens, people paddling to local stores for provisions, fish drying in the sun and other idyllic village scenery. There was even a floating restaurant and a local temple and schoolhouse that one could visit. The very basic restaurant had drinks and cooked shrimps for sale for very little money. There were no postcard pushers, no annoying cops or touts, just village people going about their daily life.
There were very few tourists when we visited as this place is not on your usual tour package AND it is relatively far (an hour ride?) from Siem Reap. We asked our tour guide Soluy to arrange the trip for us and combined it with the temples further afield-- the Pre Rup and others, all done in an afternoon. There is a bumpy stretch to get to the boats but it was a nice scenic ride. The round trip boat ride including stops was between 2 to 3 hours and cost around $10 (?) pp in a boat for only the two of us. Also on the highway to get to the boat stop there are food stalls selling sticky rice steamed in bamboo. I'd recommend that too. Freshly hulled sticky rice with coconut milk steamed in green bamboo tubes has a lovely fragrance and taste. A buck for 3?
I'd recomend this as a nice restful break between temple visits. One can even take a short nap as the boat chugs along until it reaches the watery village.

8  Thank poggibonzzi
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed January 13, 2010

This is a trip that is not for the unadventurous traveler! It starts with a car ride down a pot holed filled road until the car can go no further..... at this point a local motorcyclist takes you on the back of his bike down a heavily rutted, pot-holed road to a long covered boat. After a tour through the stilt village of Kompong Phluk, a young woman from the Women's empowerment project meets you in a dug out boat and paddles you through a "flooded forest". The forest is cool and peacefully quiet without a sign of a mosquito! Back on the larger boat for a trip out on Tonle Sap, the largest lake in Asia. The entire trip takes about 1 1/2 hours but feels like the journey of a lifetime!

11  Thank btravels
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 14, 2008

This is another journey we were determined to partake as part of our 8 day trip to Cambodia. Our brilliant guide Tek had organised this for us again.

We drove to a small little village till the car could go no further and rode in on individual motorcycles each before getting onto boat for a ride through the flooded forest and Kompong Phhluk. The bike ride went through really bumpy rodes with some of the biggest pot holes I've seen in my life but passed through scenic rice fields as well. All in all, it was great fun.

It was really interesting and fascinating looking at these houses on really high stilts. The tide was pretty low when we were there. It was good to see that the villagers were enjoying life on the river. Watching fishermen go about their daily work and just watching how the village worked on a daily basis. We were fortunate enough to witness a wedding.

Overall, it was an enjoyable day and worth a trip for something out of the ordinary.

9  Thank Adele G
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 6 days ago via mobile
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Date of experience: January 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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