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Ways to Experience Archaeological Park Ollantaytambo
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from $39.00
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All reviews sacred valley boleto turistico sun temple archaeological park tourist ticket worth the climb great site take your time beautiful ruins stone work the main square inca sites local guide surrounding mountains train station amazing place early in the morning
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Reviewed yesterday via mobile

Amazing ruins, beautiful and kind people, beautiful sun blessing us throughout the day! We loved this almost as Macchu Picchu!

Thank Linda D
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 2 days ago

Our bus bumped and jiggled north on semi paved roads through the fertile Sacred Valley passing more farms, and mountain views until we began the steep switchback descent into the town of Ollantaytambo, or “Ollanta” which at 9,160’ elevation, is “the city dedicated to corn”. Our Kaypi Peru Tour group gathered with Franco at the base of the ruins and we listened as he spoke about the design and history of Ollantaytambo pointing to photos of the ruins built in the shape of the sacred Inca llama. From where we stood we could see the image of Tunupa the creator god, etched by nature on the side of Pinkuylluna mountain across from the ruins of Ollantaytambo.

Next to Tunupa, high up on an impossibly steep slope is a series of storehouses for the grain and corn that were grown on the numerous terraces on Ollantaytambo’s steep slopes. The terraces provided a variety of different environmental growing zones created by a variation in altitude. In addition, the terraces were protected from the wind by lateral walls which also absorbed solar radiation during the day, then released the collected heat at night resulting in a unique microclimate that would be several degrees warmer than the surrounding area.

I had read that the Spanish conquistadores, in their 40 year campaign against the Incas, launched an attack on Emperor Manco Inca’s town of Ollantaytambo in 1537. The formidable ruins are perched high on a cliffside and considered part temple and part military fortress. It was here that the Incas won their greatest military victory against the Spanish conquistadors, albeit one of very few battles against the invaders.

I, after much deliberation, belatedly attempted to climb the steep stairs, and, breathing very slowly, reached a height of 9,450’, with the rest of our group. My climb was rewarded with an incredible view looking back over the steep terraces to the base of the ruin and the town below. That climb also afforded me an opportunity to see first hand the amazing Wall of the Six Monoliths at the Temple of the Sun. Typical of the genius of Inca engineers, these structures were designed with a combination of fieldstones and cut and fitted multisided, monolithic pink granite stones to last through all that the millennia could throw at them, including earthquakes. When I finally reached the Temple of the Sun I was able to see first hand why this structure is one of the great mysteries of the Andes. Six massive stones approximately 36’ wide by 14’ high, and each weighing 50 to 100 tons each, were dragged 2 1/2 miles from the quarry of Chachiqata on the other side of a 1,000’ deep valley to be pulled and rolled up this incredibly steep mountain to ultimately be lined up together so tightly that a credit card could not pass through. Littered around the base of the temple are even larger stone blocks that locals call “tired stones” because the stones were too tired to reach their final destination. I understood. I was tired too. Work was abandoned here for reasons yet unknown; could have been altered weather conditions, sickness, or maybe everyone was just plain exhausted.

Thank Kelleygirl2
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 2 days ago via mobile

If you have a chance, you must take a tour. Very impressive Inca structure and history. It's windy and the sun is strong so wear sunblock. As with other Inca ruins there are a lot of stairs, so take your time.

Thank Emily C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 2 days ago

enormous and impressive place, many terrasses and you still can imagine how it loked like in the 16th century. You can see the ramp where the huge rocks for the sun temple were transported up to the top.

Thank Werner W
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

So many aspects of Inka culture represented here. This site should be given World Heritage recognition.

Thank LaPalomaLasFlores
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago via mobile

Fascinating Inca Tambo. We went with a taxi tours, and we regretted it, because the time to visit was not enough. Allow at least a couple of hours to hike up and explore the complete circuit. More time if you want to hike up even more. The cafés and restaurants around the ruin are very nice. Good for a 1 night stay on the way to/from Aguas Calientes and Machu Picchu.

Thank rogotad
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

This is a large site and fairly "complete"- I have spent a whole morning hiking and visiting the site and I can say it was a great experience. Too often this location is missed or visited just in passing as part of large tours sampling the holy valley sites.

Our suggestion is to spend the night in the village and start early the visit, to avoid the bulk of arriving tourist buses. If planing to shop for souvenirs in the market nearby, do if later in the day once the last of the tourist buses departed to get a better price on craft items.

Transport back to Lima - use the different collectivos from the central plaza instead of the train station (Van is 5-8 soles, smaller car 8-10 soles) rather than 15-20 soles from the station.
As in case of other holy valley sites, suggest to visit them before Matchu Pitchu - few things will excite your interest once you experience the citadel!

Thank Andrei M
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 1 week ago

The view from the top is amazing. One has to wonder how the Incas built this place.
We were told is 400 steps to the top and as it is at an altitude of 2800m, one can get out of breath. But it is worth the climb!

1  Thank SueL2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 2 weeks ago

I had been here in the beginning of my time in Cusco area. I was lucky enough to visit the ruins in the morning when it was not so crowded with tourists. Even if it was for me not that easy to walk up the steps but it definitely was worth it. The view over the ruins and the valley is amazing. This place was a good starter before doing Machu Picchu.

1  Thank SSQ79
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed 2 weeks ago via mobile

Spent a couple hours exploring. 70 soles will get you into here as well as 3 other parks with ruins in the sacred valley. Good price, unless you know you can only do 1.

Thank TT442
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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