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Museo de la Memoria y los Derechos Humanos
Open today: 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
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Traveler rating
4,449
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130
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All reviews human rights audio guide pinochet regime chilean history museum is free dark period recent history important museum non spanish speakers chilli better understanding modern history excellent museum coup torture video exhibits
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Reviewed July 21, 2019

This museo does not get enough credit - it is a must visit as it gives you the chance to learn about an important chapter of Chilean history. It is very well done with videos, photos, and artifacts from the Pinochet's dictatorship. The museum should serve as a reminder to future generations,even though, it's a "tough" place to visit. Never forget!

Date of experience: September 2018
Thank Erica G
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 16, 2019

Large museum of five floors. The first floor was in Spanish but the second floor had some English and we spent a lot of time looking and reading there. There are elevators but there is a lot of standing and not many places to sit. I could have stayed much longer had I been able to rest here and there. It was somber and quiet when we arrived after lunch with few visitors. When we left after a couple of hours it was pretty busy. It is directly across from the metro.

Date of experience: March 2019
Thank tlynn63
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 16, 2019

It's the day of the military coup (September 11, 1973) which I would say is "the centerpiece" of this museum where to see on the second floor (the one right above the entrance floor although the big red sign indicates as '1') are info displays of how that day unfolded pretty much "hour by hour" with also a documentary video showing on the long screen (like about three big-screen TVs put together) and where also nearby are small screens with audio headsets for an individual viewing of some specific events or aspects of the coup, then also to see on the glass wall alongside the floor is a scene with soldiers & civilians that took place on that day (a "greatly enlarged" scene that you can really almost feel a part of standing beside it). And apart from the day of the coup as displayed on the second floor, there's also another important day (which is the day of the plebiscite or referendum that took place in 1988) displayed on the third floor where there's also a timeline breakdown of the day as similar to that of the day of the coup. Overall, there are five floors of this museum including the basement floor where I saw some pretty great enlarged black-and-white photos of Chile during those "difficult times" of the 1970's & 1980's (which may have just been a "temporary exhibit" and which were all taken by the photographer named Vincent Floor but who has long since passed away in 1990). And not inside the Museum itself, but outside on the grounds are two long walls with inscriptions of some so-called universal human rights declaration (or declarations as I'm quite sure that there's one on each wall and both "quite lengthy" ones taking up the entire lengths of the walls).

If coming by metro, Quinta Normal Station (Line 5) is where to get off which is just directly across the street from this museum, and actually there's an underground part with also a small gallery that you can enter from the metro station then come up the stairs to the museum grounds without having to go out onto the street (but which you might like to do because on the sidewalk right outside that metro station are food vendors where you can get some delicious meat-on-sticks & drinks).

Date of experience: January 2019
Thank Myo M
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 15, 2019

Of all the places I visited during my week in Santiago, this museum has stayed with me the most. It’s extremely well done, starting on the ground floor with the global context of peace & reconciliation committees around the world, before moving up to the next 2 floors that deal specifically with the Pinochet regime, from the initial coup, to the referendum that saw democracy restored. The information is brought to life in vivid detail with media footage, newspaper front pages, personal testimonies and many personal items from those who suffered under the regime.

I chose to go there because I’m interested in political history but of course, once you’re there, it’s impossible not to be moved and upset by the information & testimony of victims of torture, and the children of disappeared parents. All of this was handled as sensitively as it could be, with a memorial space to sit and reflect.

Another aspect that I think made it so interesting and widely relevant is that the museum does a good job of giving the global context as well. We learnt about the roles played throughout the regimes duration by other countries, and I was interested in the wall that told how specific countries around the world reacted to the numbers of Chileans seeking political refuge.

My only complaint, and it’s a tiny one, was that I was so bowled over by the museum I really wanted to talk through some of the things I’d read and ask a couple of questions but the only staff I could find were at the front desk, who were completely disinterested in talking. My comment that it was a fascinating museum to the man collecting the audio guides just met with a curt yes, before turning his back on me (we spoke in spanish so it wasn’t a language issue.)

My top tip would be to take the audio tour unless you’re completely fluent in Spanish as you don’t want to miss out on any of the details, and some panels are only written in Spanish.

It’s also worth knowing there’s a fairly nice cafe within the complex, and it’s easily accessible by metro.

Date of experience: July 2019
2  Thank Clare C
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 14, 2019 via mobile

It feels more a memorial than a museum. A moving and sobering experience than one feels as soon as entering the building. Pictures, videos, objects exposed are to remember the victims of tortures, killings, disappearances during the dictatorship in Chile post-1973 golpe. Worth seeing it if one does not have a clear idea of this period in Chile and its impact. The entrance is free (one can leave an offer), there is an underground parking. It is close to the Parque Quinta Normal, a large green area where other museums are located. Good for a stroll as well.

Date of experience: July 2019
Thank mcitaly2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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