We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

“Islamic Cairo”

Mosque of Ibn Tulun
Book In Advance
More Info
$19.50*
and up
Private Tour to Ibn Tulun Mosque, Gayer-Anderson Museum and Khan El Khalili...
More Info
$45.00*
and up
Private Tour: Islamic Cairo including Amr Ibn-AlAs-Ibn Tulun, Sultan Hassa and...
More Info
$57.20*
and up
Private Customizable Day tour around Giza, Saqqara and Dahshur from Cairo
Ranked #23 of 324 things to do in Cairo
Certificate of Excellence
More attraction details
Attraction details
Owner description: This is considered one of Egypt's largest and oldest mosques, which was built between AD 876 and AD 879 by an Abbasid governor sent from Baghdad to rule over Egypt.
Reviewed March 30, 2014

This is Islam's holiest site in Egypt. You will need to remove your shoes and cover exposed skin. This mosque massive but does not have the architectural details found in other mosques around Cairo.

1  Thank kms5800
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Write a ReviewReviews (269)
Traveler rating
Traveler type
Time of year
Language
  • More languages

123 - 127 of 269 reviews

Reviewed December 14, 2013

It is really pity that people who visit Cairo usually visit only pyramids, Sphinx and Egyptian museum... maybe eventually small part of Coptic Cairo with few churches... True beauty and marvels of Cairo are actually in old Arabic parts of the town... and Ibn Tulun is one of true gems of that part of the city... Magnificent structure from late 9th century AD is among largest and oldest of all Cairo mosques and it is truly worth visit... if you are lucky enough there will be no people there at all... and you can wonder alone... even go up to that unique spiral minaret... and very close to it there is another gem of Islamic Cairo - Gayer Anderson Museum - situated in two magnificent examples of 16-17 century city houses - Bayt al-Kritliyya and Bayt Amna bint Salim... also worth visiting...

3  Thank tedvard
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed August 15, 2013

This is one of the most beautiful and unique mosques you will see. It is pictured in all books featuring unique and iconic mosques. I was practically alone when I was there, which is surprising. It should be on every travelers list who loves beautiful architecture.

1  Thank ColoradoVirginia
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 30, 2013

The police at this location have proved a nuisance whenever I have gone there with my Egyptian friends. I guess they find it impossible to believe that an expat and an Egyptian might be friends. I had a major altercation with police there and have been counseled to take photos of the policeman in question and communicate that i will file a formal complaint at the nearest police station and with my embassy. This should fix the situation.

I find this extremely sad to report because I find Ibn Tulun mosque a quiet refuge and a marvelous place to visit when paired with the Gayer Anderson museum which is adjacent.

Thank Peter D
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 27, 2013

The taxi took us through a myriad of narrow streets, full of busy pushcart vendors and donkey carts, before depositing us at the gate to the mosque. The mosque itself seems to be surrounded by an outer wall and once inside the inner wall, it was an oasis of tranquility.

Probably because it was already late in the day, there were hardly any visitors and we were able to climb the larger minaret to get a bird’s eye view of the mosque itself and the surrounding neighborhood, including the glittering dome of the Mohammed Ali mosque some distance away. The Ibn Tulan mosque is much older and less glitzy than the Mohammed Ali mosque, although the small minarets have beautiful architecture. The whole mosque is primarily desert-sand colored with a large courtyard, with a single dome structure in the middle. The archways and windows along the corridors have nice detailing but whatever colors, if ever, have been lost, lending the mosque it’s own austere appeal and sense of old age. Recommended.

2  Thank Tantiko
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Travelers who viewed Mosque of Ibn Tulun also viewed

 

Been to Mosque of Ibn Tulun? Share your experiences!

Write a Review Add Photos & Videos

Owners: What's your side of the story?

Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.

Claim Your Listing