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Reviewed March 28, 2019 via mobile

A nice stop. Not large but the temples of Chiang Mai are very different than Bangkok, so interesting to see. We also were able to see the older monks training children going to school to be monks in the assembly hall.

Date of experience: March 2019
Thank Twwhit72
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 25, 2019

Very impressive temple located on Suthep Road, outside of the old city. We chose to walk, it took about 20 minutes.
The temple was very large and airy and peaceful. Outside the white Chedi were beautiful, although some were being repaired.
Well worth the walk.

Date of experience: March 2019
Thank JR_Essex
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 24, 2019

Built in the 14th century, you see many white, bell-shaped chedi, as you enter from Suthep Road, west of the moat and city centre. It's on the left as you head westwards.

As well as the main chedi, there is a large prayer room - containing two very revered images of Buddha. Wat Suan Dok is well known for its 'monk chats'.

Unfortunately an entrance fee has been introduced here, due to the bus loads of tourists arriving.

Date of experience: February 2019
Thank chiangmaicharlies
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 24, 2019

Wat Suan Dok is one of the very ancient Chiang Mai temples outside the city walls, along Suthep road and has many connection to Thai royalty. There is a lot to see but simply wandering around is the best way to absorb the atmosphere of this large and friendly temple. Although there is a small entrance fee of 20 baht, the temple is far from being so overtly mercenary as many others in the city. Try to make time for the monk chat with KK Pra, a warm hearted teacher (the Wat doubles as a major teaching centre for young monks) who speaks good English. The coffee shop/vegetarian restaurant on the main road through the temple grounds too is fine for a light meal and was selling some brochures and other Buddhist literature in English when we visited.

Date of experience: March 2019
Thank Wingfield73
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 21, 2019

Perhaps the most bucolic temples of Chiang Mai. Originally Wat Suan Dok (Suan Dok means field of flowers) is an ancient Buddhist temple, built in the 14th century, for the pleasure of the sovereigns of Chiang Mai in the gardens of King Mengrai, before being a major place in the spread of Buddhism throughout the country, following the installation of a revered monk within it. Behind its high enclosure, one can see white, bell-shaped chedi, as one encounters in Sukhothai. According to the stories, the whitewashed pagodas that make up all the mausoleums of the temples once belonged to the ancient rulers and noble families of Chiang Mai, starting with King Kawila (1802 - 1813) to Princess Kokaew Prakaykavil (1934 - 2005). Princess Dara Rasmi, one of King Chulalongkorn's wives, was reportedly ordered to collect the remains of the royal family scattered in the other sites of Chiang Mai, in 1909, to drop them there.

Wat Suan Dok is all about its main golden chedi, built in the Sri Lankan style, which is 48 meters high. It is known to house ancient relics of Buddha from other temples. . But the jewel of the Wat is his bronze Buddha in the small chapel ( wiham ), dating from the 15C. and realized according to the artistic canons of Lan Na style. . To the east of the main chedi, there is the large prayer room, unique in its kind because of its large structure with open sides (Buddhist prayer rooms are almost always closed) It was built around 1932 by a well-known monk named Phra Krubra Srivichai.
This room contains two very revered images of Buddha. One, of impressive size while standing holding a straw boot and the other smaller, sitting meditation position. These images are placed in opposite directions, that is to say, the imposing statue is redirected in the west direction of the chedi, while the other turns in the direct east. Beside the latter is also a smaller image of Buddha.
Wat Suan Dok has another Buddha statue made of bronze, called Phra Chao Kao Tu, sitting in the Bhumisparsha Mudra posture. It was created in 1504 under the orders of King Muang Kaeo. It is 4.7 meters high and is currently placed in in the main ordination hall (the Ubosot). This image of Buddha is particularly distinguished from others by its style of dress typical of the kingdom of Ayutthaya, but with some influences of Sukhotai, especially in terms of the length of the fingers. (each finger is the same size as the other fingers)

Wat Suan Dok is also today .. the site of the Buddhist university of Chiang Mai

 From the Suan Dok gate 15-20 mins walk through the Suthep Rd , Entrance is free except for the main ordination hall .. It's possible to chat with resident monks who have a vague notion of English. The temple is open every day from 6h to 22h .. Worth a visit

Date of experience: November 2018
1  Thank Patrick D
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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