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Ways to Experience Queen Street
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Reviewed March 20, 2019

Queen Street is an amazing road to stroll around and went shopping. There are many fantastic stores lining up the whole street.

Date of experience: October 2018
Thank lucybeltran
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 15, 2019

Departing from the Cordis Hotel, we made our way over to Queen Street (the major commercial street in Auckland's Central Business District, named after Queen Victoria) and followed it down to the Queens Wharf (near the Britomart Transit Center). After checking into the hotel, we were in hot pursuit of some really good ethnic food, (i.e. something with actual "flavor"). Auckland is a rapidly expanding melting pot of many cultures due to expanded immigration policies and Auckand's need for workers; they brought their cooking with them.

The mid-point section of Queen Street is Aotea Square (subject of another review). This is the center for entertainment and civic activities. Wellesley Street is however pretty much the literal half-way point on Queen Street. But the major stop on weekends and most anytime is the Aotea Square (look for the Maori arch) across from the Town Hall building (a monument). But we were off to explore the wharf.

Making our way down to the wharf, we were impressed with the Maori/English melding of the cultures. Everywhere we looked, we saw monuments to the results of the cooperative efforts of these dissimilar cultures. We learned that Maori and English are the 2 official languages of New Zealand (how is that for a starter).

It's hard to go too far without being exposed to the Treaty of Waitangi (1840) characterized by the 3 p's: partnership, participation, and protection. It ended a long period of time (think 100 years or more) of British occupation pockmarked by bloody battles between occupiers and occupied. At the end of the proverbial day, the British had set forth the worst case scenario: hey, it's either us or the French (and you really won't like them) or the Russians (and you most certainly will not like them) so ... let's work it out. And thus the Maori found themselves between a rock and a hard place.

Okay, that's the history in a nutshell (but not too far off the mark). 500 Maori chiefs negotiated super-dooper major $$$$ big-bucks settlements for the "appropriation" (i.e. theft) of their land dating back to the initial occupation (with mightily compounded interest ... think "billions")..

They invested in their Maori communities as they saw fit. Bad decisions were common but more tribes prospered and they continue to do so today. As we walked along the Queen Street/Wharf area, we read the stories and marveled at how this country dealt with the indigenous people (in contrast to other countries who practiced near genocide). It's a relatively peaceful and respectful coexistance today (or so the story runs).

On our way back to the hotel, we did pick up some fairly awesome doner kebabs from a small shop on Queen (Star Kebab). For $11 NZ dollars, the wraps are huge, flavorful, and the cheese is perfect with the sauce-laden vertical spit cooked chicken.

Back to Queen Street ... shopping along Queen Street varies from quaint Asian arcades with wonderful menues, high-end shopping, vacant store fronts, homeless people, but it really is all about the multitude and variety of eateries. This is a foodie's mecca! From this vantage point, we certainly picked up on the diversity of the population.

In our limited travels in New Zealand, this was the most diverse, high-energy city/location we visited. Loved it! Such vitality is hard to find anywhere else.

Date of experience: February 2019
1  Thank on_the_go_98765
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 9, 2019 via mobile

Its a very easy walk here from the YHA and there's a nice variety of places to eat (especially for some good and cheap kebab) as well as lots of contdown supermarket stores if you want to save on food. There's a number of theaters and performance centers so it can get a bit raucous with the street performers, but it has nothing on Wellington, which gets really wild. If you're a peace and quiet lover like myself you may want to head for Mount Eden.

It's a little like City Center in Adelaide, SA.

Date of experience: February 2019
Thank TravelAngler725
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed March 3, 2019

We passed through this area on our way back to the ship docked at Queen’s Wharf. Easy to get to from Queen’s Wharf if you want to do some shopping

Date of experience: February 2019
Thank Sue M
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed February 24, 2019

This place has all “attraction pick up points” on a walking distance. Plus has the attractions like sky tower right there. Food from many different cuisines. Gift shops. Super market like Count Down. Try to get a hotel to stay on Queen Street n you will save a lot of money on your trip. Myers Park n Albert Park on the walking distance from almost all the hotels that are on Queen st.

Date of experience: January 2019
Thank NOSHEEN T
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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