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“Boat ride through the Corinth Canal”
Review of Corinth Canal

Corinth Canal
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$73.85*
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Ancient Corinth and Daphni Monastery Half-Day Tour from Athens
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$119.11*
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Ancient Corinth Private Tour from Corinth
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$256.08*
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Ancient Corinth Private Day Trip from Athens
Ranked #3 of 17 things to do in Corinth
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Recommended length of visit: <1 hour
Seattle, Washington, United States
Level 6 Contributor
183 reviews
96 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 110 helpful votes
“Boat ride through the Corinth Canal”
Reviewed October 28, 2013

We stopped at the bridge to view the Corinth Canal, which is interesting but then we went farther into Corinth and got on a boat and went from one end of the canal to the other and back again. It was a pleasant ride and was really beautiful in areas. The engineering for a canal in 1893 was also pretty spectacular. Two of the bridges crossing the canal that locals use drop down under the water when a boat passes. This was really interesting to watch. Boats have to make reservations to go through the canal and are charge accordingly.

Visited October 2013
Helpful?
8 Thank Kathy G
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Milan, Italy
Level 6 Contributor
231 reviews
58 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 245 helpful votes
“Nice relaxing minicruise with snack bar on board”
Reviewed October 24, 2013

The idea for a shortcut to save boats sailing all round the Peloponnese was long considered by the Ancient Greeks. The first attempt to build a canal there was carried out by the tyrant Periander in the 7th century BC. He abandoned the project owing to technical difficulties, and instead constructed a simpler and less costly overland stone ramp, named Diolkos, as a portage road. Remnants of Diolkos still exist today next to the modern canal. When the Roman republic (later to be the Roman Empire) took control of Greece, a number of different solutions were tried. Julius Caesar foresaw the advantages of a link for his newly built Colonia Laus Iulia Corinthiensis. By the reign of Tiberius, engineers tried to dig a canal, but were defeated by lack of modern equipment. Instead they built an Ancient Egyptian device: boats were rolled across the isthmus on logs, as the Egyptians had rolled blocks of granite to make their pyramids. This was in use by AD 32. In AD 67, the philhellene Roman emperor Nero ordered 6,000 slaves to dig a canal with spades. According to Pliny the Elder, the work advanced four stadia (about 5/8 kilometers). The following year Nero died, and his successor Galba abandoned the project as being too expensive.
In the modern era, the idea was first seriously proposed in 1830, soon after Greece's independence from the Ottoman Empire, and was brought to completion in 1893 after eleven years' work.
The work on the canal was carried out by a combination of French and Greek workmen. The Corinth Canal was actually based on the “Panama and Suez Canals”, and has often been referred to as the “step-child” of these canals.

The Corinth Canal is still in use today, though many newer and larger ships are too large to pass through any more. However, the canal is still used by many smaller ships and sailing boats.

It is curious to see when cars are stopping because the bridges start to sink into the canal to let your boat passing. People sitting at the canal tavernas waive their hands to say hello and a solitaire gull is looking at you on a rock and all around the colour of the sea is an incredible turquoise.

Visited September 2013
Helpful?
4 Thank Alex H
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
NY, NY
Level 6 Contributor
519 reviews
327 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 288 helpful votes
“Neat.”
Reviewed October 23, 2013

It's not a long canal since you can see the start and end from the 2 bridge/lookout points. There is a restaurant with restrooms and a small gift shop where most tour buses park. Visitors simply walk one minute to the metal bridge where the canal can be viewed. Bungee jumping from a platform off that same bridge is available but must be booked ahead of time.

Visited October 2013
Helpful?
Thank Dushi-NY
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Inverness, United Kingdom
Level 5 Contributor
69 reviews
17 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 28 helpful votes
“Found it!”
Reviewed October 23, 2013

Tried to visit here almost a year ago but couldn't find it. It seems we went to far but now I know. To get to the canal travel to Isthmia and drive almost to the end of the village and (coming from Corinth) you'll see some traffic lights and a left turn. If you miss the left turn you can turn into the Isthmia supermarket and retrace your steps back. Take the left turn and drive until you reach a small bridge, on the right is a church (we parked here). The bridge is lowered to allow the boats along the canal which is to your left, if you walk away from the bridge and the canal, to the right you'll find the boats that take you along the canal. We went on Anna and it seems to depart on the hour at 10.00 and 11.00. It's worth going along the canal to experience the engineering feat as the actual idea was conceived during BC but wasn't actually achieved until the early 19th century. I also went to consider the people that would have lost lives building it (and trying to).

Visited October 2013
Helpful?
2 Thank Shortbreadandwhisky
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Montville, New Jersey
Level 6 Contributor
641 reviews
483 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 902 helpful votes
“Combine canal cruise with ancient Corinth”
Reviewed October 19, 2013

Just an hour and 15 minute drive (48 miles) from the Port of Piraeus, the Corinth Canal is well worth seeing and experiencing. It's a scenic drive along the coastal road of the Saronic Gulf of Corinth and is on your way to the ancient ruins of Corinth which is another 20 minute drive. Stop at the bridge overlooking the canal for photo shots and tickets for a canal cruise. Tickets are cheaper then if you buy them at the canal cruise port. The canal is 4 miles long and the boat ride is about 4 miles and takes about an hour. Mezza and snacks with a choice of beverage are served along the way.It's 20 euros per person. The walls rise about 230' in some places. A bridge which can be lifted is under water for passage of ships but can be lifted with hydrolics. It's 72 feet wide and 24 feet deep so today it is used for tourism for the most part but when it was completed in 1893 vessels used it regularly. The canal connects the Gulf of Corinth (Ionian Sea_ with the Saronic Gulf (Agean Sea).

Visited September 2013
Helpful?
7 Thank duck8to
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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