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“One of the worlds first ghettos”
Review of Campo del Ghetto

Campo del Ghetto
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$73.83*
and up
Private Walking Tour: Venice's Jewish Ghetto
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$155.78*
and up
Jewish Ghetto and Cannaregio Food Tour with Dinner in Venice
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$123.38*
and up
Traditional Home Cooking Experience in Venice
Ranked #33 of 800 things to do in Venice
Certificate of Excellence
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Owner description: Dating back to the 16th-century, this is the oldest Jewish Ghetto in the world with its five synagogues, which are the oldest still existing.
Reviewed October 17, 2012

This was an interesting and less tourity section of Venice. If you are interested in a locations history (all of it), this is an area worth wandering around.

Thank Orianarose
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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449 - 453 of 995 reviews

Reviewed October 14, 2012

The Ghetto is not far from the train station or from the busy tourist path from the ships. Yet, once you find the central plaza with children at play in the afternoon, or see the Orthodox Jews making their way home, or just take a seat for a few moments you are far away from the other Venice. We found it drawing us in and then back for a meal. We found it historic and homelike. Please take time to visit and just stroll the area it is not a great place of art or glamor. It is a place you will, however, long remember.

Thank Maconthemove
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed October 11, 2012

We can't imagine to be in Venice and not visit the area that used to be if not the first Jewish ghetto in the world, but definitely the first one to be called the word 'ghetto'; the origin of the word is in the corrupted Italian/Venetian dialect. The entire area of the ghetto consists of two parts connected by a bridge; Gheto (the Venetian spelling) Novo and Gheto Vechio, the New and Old Ghettos respectively. The Gheto Novo looks distinctively different from the other parts of Venice with its taller buildings (a way to overcome the limited living area and the dense population of the ghetto) and its square (campo) strewn with Judaica stores, Kosher restaurant and shops, memorials, Jewish museum, commemorative plaques and synagogues. The synagogues of different Jewish persuasions and ethnic origins can't be observed from the outside though; it was dictated by the city's ordinances, so except for taller, more-floors-featuring buildings, a few store signs and memorial plaques, the outside doesn't really differ from the rest of Venice, architecture-wise. Th enjoy therefore the ghetto sightseeing fully one has to allocate more time to visit the museum and the inside of the synagogues and not limit oneself with a mere walk. The Old Ghetto (Gheto Vechio) is is smaller, less distinctively Jewish, featuring a few Jewish stores and ubiquitous Chabad-Lubavitch posters and advertisements.
Our advice would be to combine a visit to the Venice Ghetto and the nearby Campo dei Mori; the latter is only about 5 minutes walk from the Gheto Novo, off the usual tourist path, and is very picturesque with its three Moore statues.

Thank RGSOUNDF
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed September 27, 2012

One doesn't always associate Venice with the Jews, but this is the first place that the word Ghetto was used. It is very interesting to wander around the area, looking at the different types of buildings that the Jewish people were forced to use.

Thank mwaller3
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 26, 2012

This area was uncrowded with tourists and offers a glimpse into a culture that is foreign even to most Italians. The area has historical significance. Also I'm a picky eater and figured the food there was cooked in Kosher kitchens and safe to eat.

Thank Nomenclature871
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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