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“Outdoor Memorial on Custom House Quay”

The Famine Sculptures
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$17.43*
and up
EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum Tour
Ranked #27 of 512 things to do in Dublin
Certificate of Excellence
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Attraction details
Recommended length of visit: <1 hour
Owner description: 'Famine' (1997) was commissioned by Norma Smurfit and presented to the City of Dublin in 1997. The sculpture is a commemorative work dedicated to those Irish people forced to emigrate during the 19th century Irish Famine. The bronze sculptures were designed and crafted by Dublin sculptor Rowan Gillespie and are located on Custom House Quay in Dublin's Docklands. This location is a particularly appropriate and historic as one of the first voyages of the Famine period was on the 'Perserverance' which sailed from Custom House Quay on St. Patrick's Day 1846. The area is also home to two other attractions that chronicle this chapter in Irish history. The Jeanie Johnston Tall Ship & Famine Story is a replica famine-era ship and offers tours of the conditions famine migrants would have endured. EPIC The Irish Emigration Museum is a fully digital museum that tells the amazing story and history of Irish emigration, including that of the Great Famine period.
Useful Information: Activities for older children, Stairs / elevator, Food available for purchase, Wheelchair access, Stroller parking, Lockers / storage, Activities for young children, Bathroom facilities
Reviewed July 23, 2013

This sculpture was commissioned by the Smurfits, and is in place since 1997. It's dedicated to those who had to emigrate during the Famine, in the 19th century. Many Irish people would have left Ireland from this very spot, and one of the first voyages of the famine, would have been on the "Perserverance", which sailed on St. Patricks Day 1846. In 2007, a second series of Famine Sculptures was unveiled in Toronto, to remember the arrival of those refugees in Canada.

Thank letterkennycaint
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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"potato famine"
in 112 reviews
"great famine"
in 87 reviews
"custom house quay"
in 41 reviews
"great hunger"
in 27 reviews
"moving tribute"
in 26 reviews
"poignant reminder"
in 25 reviews
"irish potato"
in 22 reviews
"tall ship"
in 34 reviews
"jeanie johnston"
in 22 reviews
"liffey river"
in 17 reviews
"north side"
in 35 reviews
"ireland's history"
in 31 reviews
"o'connell street"
in 18 reviews
"farming"
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Reviewed July 21, 2013

Throughout the city of Dublin, tourists would stumble upon famine sculptures here and there to remind people the Irish's tragedy of Great Famine which caused approximately 1 million people died and a million more emigrated from Ireland. The Ireland's Great Famine a.k.a. Potato Famine is a human starvation and death in Irish history between 1845-1852 There are two locations of famine sculptures I have seen. One small set of famine sculptures is located inside of St. Stephen's Green, and another set is located at Custom House Quay. The bronze sculptures were designed and crafted by Dublin sculptor Rowan Gillespie. The skeleton-look-alike human figures are to remind people the potato famine tragedy that brought upon Irish folks who had suffered 7 years of starvations and struggles to survive. Rowan Gillespie's hands explicitly sculpted the emotional and physical sufferings in visual formations. Their bony figures caused by the starvations and facial expressions of pains and sufferings enough to give you bone chilled goose bumps while looking at them. This is a memorial place dedicated to the Irish who have suffered the famine and forced to emigrate during the Great Famine. This was also a place of one of first famine voyages Perseverance sailed away from here by 74 years old maritime veteran Captain William Scott from New Brunswick. He transported 210 Irish for a cost of £3. They left on St.Patrick's Day in 1846 and 2 months later safely arrived in New York city.

Thank unescotravelbug
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 21, 2013

This sculpture is right close to the Jennie Johnston Tall Ship which tells more about the famine in Ireland and how it was for the people. The potato famine changed life for the whole of Ireland a growing population suddenly plummeted with those who could emigrating and others dying young and hungry.

Thank CotonH
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Reviewed July 20, 2013

We felt we had to take the walk and see this sculpture. It depicts such an important part of Irish history. It is quite haunting and really hammers home the misery and oppression the people of Ireland endured. Don't just tour / Drive by. Walk up and really take the time to look at it.

1  Thank Tjornin-Troll
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Reviewed July 18, 2013

It's moving and painful. Especially when you've understood the history behind it. These lone figures represent millions, and touch your heart.

Thank Ruhu61
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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