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“This will take your breath away” 5 of 5 bubbles
Review of The Famine Sculpture

The Famine Sculpture
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$14.91*
and up
Dublin Liffey River Cruise
Ranked #24 of 499 things to do in Dublin
Certificate of Excellence
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Recommended length of visit: <1 hour
Owner description: 'Famine' (1997) was commissioned by Norma Smurfit and presented to the City of Dublin in 1997. The sculpture is a commemorative work dedicated to those Irish people forced to emigrate during the 19th century Irish Famine. The bronze sculptures were designed and crafted by Dublin sculptor Rowan Gillespie and are located on Custom House Quay in Dublin's Docklands. This location is a particularly appropriate and historic as one of the first voyages of the Famine period was on the 'Perserverance' which sailed from Custom House Quay on St. Patrick's Day 1846. Captain William Scott, a native of the Shetland Isles, was a veteran of the Atlantic crossing, gave up his office job in New Brunswick to take the 'Perserverance' out of Dublin. He was 74 years old. The Steerage fare on the ship was £3 and 210 passengers made the historical journey. They landed in New York on the 18th May 1846. All passengers and crew survived the journey. In June 2007, a second series of famine sculptures by Rowan Gillespie, was unveiled by President Mary McAleese on the quayside in Toronto's Ireland Park to remember the arrival of these refugees in Canada. The World Poverty Stone The World Poverty Stone is a commemorative stone marking the United Nations International Day for the Eradication of World Poverty. It is sited to the east of the Famine Sculptures on Custom House Quay in the heart of Dublin's Docklands. This limestone memorial was commissioned as a gesture of solidarity with people living in poverty around the world. On the 17th of October 1987, in response to the call of Joseph Wresinski - founder of the International Movement ATD Fourth World - 100,000 defenders of human rights gathered in Paris to honour the victims of hunger, violence and ignorance, to express their refusal of extreme poverty and to call on people from all walks of life to unite to ensure respect for human rights. A commemorative stone proclaiming this message was inaugurated on this occasion on the Plaza of Human Rights and Liberties - where the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was signed in 1948. Since then, on the 17th of October each year, people from all walks of life, gather throughout the world to express their solidarity and commitment to ensure that everyone's dignity and freedom are respected. On 22nd of December 1992, the General Assembly of the United Nations declared 17th October the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. There are now over 30 replicas of the original stone now located around the world. These sites have become places of honour for people living in poverty in the world, places where people gather to reject the inevitability of poverty and social exclusion and places of friendship and solidarity where people from all backgrounds can gather together. Around the world, annual commemoration take place at the site of the stones to mark the 17th October UN International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. The artist - Stuart McGrath, based in Co. Wicklow, is a master craftsman; his training is in sculpture, architectural and classical stone carving. All of his stonecutting is done by hand using traditional methods.
Useful Information: Wheelchair access, Stairs / elevator, Lockers / storage, Activities for older children, Stroller parking, Activities for young children, Food available for purchase, Bathroom facilities
Melbourne, Australia
Level Contributor
34 reviews
12 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 8 helpful votes
“This will take your breath away”
5 of 5 bubbles Reviewed June 21, 2013

This is the most amazing memorial, as I would refer to it. The sculptures are breathtaking in their size and tell the story of how it must have been in the famine, more than I could have imagined. They evoked very powerful feelings within me that I will carry forever.

Visited October 2012
Helpful?
Thank Margaret C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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San Jose, Costa Rica
Level Contributor
76 reviews
26 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 41 helpful votes
“Sad but True”
5 of 5 bubbles Reviewed June 20, 2013

This memorial was shocking and emotionally moving. The faces on the statues really makes one think about what they went through. It is worth visiting.

Visited June 2013
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Thank Yep2Happy
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Dublin, Ireland
Level Contributor
63 reviews
43 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 19 helpful votes
“history and sadness”
4 of 5 bubbles Reviewed June 18, 2013

for dublin people its not really noticeable but if you stop to actually stare at it, it does makr you think about potatoes crops in ireland in the past and the immigration it caused, it is kinda moving and very sad. you need to know about history to get it though

Visited June 2013
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1 Thank triptripexpert
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Vancouver, Canada
Level Contributor
224 reviews
133 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 164 helpful votes
“Moving!”
5 of 5 bubbles Reviewed June 17, 2013

There is real passion on the faces of the figures in the Famine Sculpture...one can almost feel their hunger and their pain. The emotions are so clear that the tall statues are a little freaky but also a strong reminder of a terrible time. I found it to be a very strong sculpture, and in amongst some trees on the River Liffey, the location was lovely.
There are some nice cafes across the street afterwards.

I hope this review helps!

Visited June 2013
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1 Thank James R
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Fort Worth, Texas
Level Contributor
52 reviews
30 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 55 helpful votes
“Walk by”
3 of 5 bubbles Reviewed June 16, 2013

You will probably walk / ride by during your visit to Dublin. Sad time in history for Dublin; contemplate how fortunate we are now.

Visited May 2013
Helpful?
Thank john h
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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