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“Everything was North of expected!”

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Frontiers North Adventures' Tundra Buggy Lodge
Seattle
Level 6 Contributor
107 reviews
22 hotel reviews
common_n_hotel_reviews_1bd8 47 helpful votes
“Everything was North of expected!”
Reviewed November 25, 2011

We stayed on the lodge for the last tour of the season and were treated to a once in a lifetime experience. We were a bit apprehensive about the bunkhouses but wanted to stay where the bears are. Lucky for us, they had just installed brand new bunkhouses. They were warm and comfortable. Now there are 2 showers and 3 flush toilets per bunkhouse.

Bree, Julie and Tibor run the lodge with great care. The food was amazing, even the picnic lunches they sent us off with each day. We had warm soups each day and even had hamburgers heated on the propane buggy heater one day!

Jim our buggy driver and Richard our tour leader were first class. They took great care of us and shared their knowledge with us. It was obvious they were having as much fun as we were.

Staying at the lodge allows you more time with the bears. Going at the end of the season is great because the bears are more active in colder weather. An added bonus is the people on the buggy who are working with Polar Bears International. They were great to talk to and learn from. We were treated to a few evening presentations by these experts.

Finally, the Polar Bears. They were everywhere and almost always close to the lodge. We were lucky enough to spend many hours watching these beautiful creatures.

This trip is quite expensive but worth every penny. If you have the time and the money, do it. You will not be disappointed. It exceeded all of my expectations.

  • Stayed November 2011
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8 Thank Gatordogs
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Pinjarra, Australia
Level 6 Contributor
218 reviews
86 hotel reviews
common_n_hotel_reviews_1bd8 181 helpful votes
Reviewed November 19, 2011

Had to meet with the organizers and rest of the people on the tour at 6.15am (horrors) for the start of our polar bear trip at the Sheraton hotel at the airport. They then took us by bus to the charter plane area, we were surprised to be boarded onto a Boeing 737 – 200, thought it would be a propeller plane or turbo-prop. There were 36 in our group who were spending the 2 nights out on the tundra in their ‘lodge’ at Polar Bear Point, but a few other groups who were staying in the town of Churchill and just going in on the Tundra in the day were on the same plane. Churchill is about 1100kms north of Winnipeg on the edge of Hudson Bay. A very ‘basic’ little outback town, somewhat bleak, icy streets and patches of old snow around. And freezing!! Thermals, and 3 layers plus jackets etc needed. Polar bears often roam into town so locals don’t lock their vehicles or houses, thus giving people a place to escape to if confronted by a bear. Bears that come into town are trapped and put in a huge holding facility called the Polar Bear jail (or more politically correctly called ‘the polar bear holding area) - it’s the only air conditioned building in Churchill. They are held until the ice has formed then released miles away. They have no human contact while there and just fed enough hay to keep them alive, we weren’t allowed to see them, just heard them thumping around in the huge shed (if they fed them fish they would keep coming back to the jail when hungry!) – Not very pleasant for the bears, but better than being shot as they were years ago. They even now have a fully enclosed rubbish dump inside a giant shed to stop the bears scavenging.
We all had lunch together then had free time in Churchill and at 4.30 were driven by bus for ½ hr to the boarding area for the ‘Tundra Buggies”. Then it was a 2 hr very rough slow trip in the buggy to the Tundra Buggy Lodge. I had expected there to be heaps of snow lying around, but they haven’t had much snow yet. Apparently the tundra never builds up much of a snow base as it is so flat and the winds so strong – there were patches of snow lying around, not much vegetation just scrubby bushes, and endless numbers of shallow lakes all over which were partly frozen. Very cold arctic wind blowing, we were grateful for the heater in the vehicle. Enjoyable though as we were on the look-out for animals. It was dark when we arrived, but the headlights picked up an arctic fox running down the road. That was a good start.
A bit of an explanation of what was involved. Firstly our vehicle around the tundra was a purpose built million dollar bus with (giant big foot) a ground clearance of 2.5 mtrs, max speed a screaming 30kph; built in large gas heater (much needed) and a pre-runner to a chemical toilet. (better described as an old thunder box) Very wide vehicle with 10 rows of double seats down each side and heaps of standing place in the middle (could have fitted in another 8 seats across). A caged viewing platform for bear viewing (or smokers) out the back. The whole area where we were had been a military firing range in the cold war days, so there were clearly defined tracks that we were not allowed to deviate off as there are still unexploded shells around, they also don’t want to mess up too much of the area with tyre tracks. We chose to spend the 2 nights out on the tundra for greater chance of seeing bears, and not having to waste time driving 2 ½ hours from Churchill and back each day, and were rewarded for this. Accommodation is best described as a dormitory style railway carriage. 2 wagons of curtained off bunk beds, 2 toilets 1 shower and 1 heater in each wagon. Then there was a lounge and another wagon for dining room, kitchen etc. That was followed by the staff quarters. So you had this train of several big foot carriages that are high enough off the ground so the bears cannot have access. It certainly wasn’t luxurious (but we were aware of this), better described as basic and adequate and it did the job. Bunks were however more comfortable than Amtrak sleepers (wider and more head room). People were all very considerate and there was no noise or partying at night, everyone was tucked up in bed by 10pm. Food wasn’t haute cuisine, but very nice, made by the 3 staff on the lodge (don’t know how they don’t get ‘cabin fever’ as they stay on the Lodge the whole time (around 2 months) and can’t even go for a walk as no one is allowed onto the ground while out there (except for urgent vehicle maintenance etc with a few armed guards for bears)
It was a very interesting group of people of various nationalities and all ages, from two sixteen year olds, one with parents and one with a grandmother (nice lady who has taken each of her grandchildren on some sort of trip!) to a very sprightly 74 year old. Unusual crowd too as all were dedicated travellers, 6 of the 36 had climbed Kilimanjaro and the 74yr old is planning to. Quite a few had also been to Rwanda to see the gorillas; so many good conversations were had sharing tables at meal times. Good group too, all worked well together and no whingers.
Headed off in the Tundra Buggy at 8 o’clock both days, had lunch on the Buggy and returned to base around 4.30. Drove all around a wide area looking for wildlife and bears, amazing vehicles could drive through water and mud and over boulders. Fun crunching through shallow (we hoped!) icy lakes when the tracks went through them. No one was allowed to stand up while the vehicle was moving, too much likelihood of falling over.
Sadly Hudson Bay hadn’t frozen over yet thanks to global warming, so there weren’t as many polar bears around as there should have been. The polar bears habitual migratory path thru Churchill and out onto the ice to catch and eat seals after 5 months of not eating is on hold as a result. We did see about nine bears right up close (not sure if we sometimes saw the same one twice!), but we also had two bonuses. Saw three very rare Arctic Foxes (our driver said he only saw 3 last year in total) one was walking on a frozen lake (beautiful reflections) he was watching something in the bushes so kept on stopping then approaching the bushes and retreating again, also ran down the road right towards the vehicle. But then we had the #1 highlight, which had our driver racing for his camera with comments like “you don’t realise how rare it is to witness this.” The even rarer cross back silver fox (looked black) chasing a snow hare – didn’t get him though (poor cute fat white bunny!). At one stage the fox jumped up onto a rock to see where his quarry had gone. Apparently that’s unheard of. Move over David Attenborough!!! Also saw other interesting birds (a snowy owl; an immature bald eagle who should have flown south weeks ago and plenty of Ptarmigan (arctic bird) snow goose, animals such as an ermine (short tailed weasel) and arctic hare who have large black dots on the back of their ears which gives the impression that they have eyes in the back of their head.
It was pretty hard to spot the bears as they were all in sleepy mode as they knew it wasn’t worth their going out to the shore to check the ice yet, they make nice little cosy ‘nests’ in the kelp on the shore line and lie there to keep warm, just see their heads popping up to see what is going on when the buggy approaches. As we approached the lodge on our return on the second afternoon there was a bear standing on its rear legs trying to get into the kitchen; he could smell the food cooking, but he realised that he wasn’t going to succeed and sulked away, (shame he had not eaten for 5 months.) They do have extremely strict rules on absolutely under no circumstance can you feed a bear as they don’t want them getting used to human food and becoming scavengers in town. Every bit of “trash” and human waste has to be trucked off the tundra back to H Q. It was colder the second night and a bit more ice had formed so bears were moving around a bit more in the early morning. When we went to board the buggy (the buggy docks right onto the ‘train’ so you don’t touch ground walking onto it) we were rewarded with a big daddy bear, only a few metres from our lodge, doing his best golden retriever impersonations of rolling on its back, legs kicking in the air, then sliding his chin and neck along the ground. Poor bear thought there must have been a seal under the frozen pond he was standing on, because he suddenly started jumping up and down on the ice, trying to smash it open as they do when they’re at a seals hole. We followed him for a while when he walked off and tried to get around in front of him but he got spooked and raced off into the distance (they’re very strict too about not upsetting the animals and getting them stressed so we couldn’t chase after him). The sun soon came out which was lovely as there was a beautiful sunrise and great reflections on the lakes. But it put the bears to sleep again and they draped themselves over the warmed up rocks to slumber and barely raised an eyebrow when we stopped. A couple did at least lumber up and move around a bit which was nice. No mothers and cubs though and no bears sparring with each other up on their hind legs.
Overall the polar bear trip was a bit disappointing in one way as they had portrayed it that there would be bears all around the Lodge and area, and maybe there are in good years, but once we got over that expectation not being fulfilled we enjoyed it as one would a safari in Africa where you have to go out and spot the animals, and saw many other animals we hadn’t expected to see. No Northern Lights sadly as it was overcast both evenings.
I would recommend it, but if you are expecting it to be like a private game park as you find in South Africa, where they put out salt licks and know where all the animals are at any one time, then forget it. However, if you are willing to go and try and find your own animals like you do in Kruger National Park, then it would be OK for you. The other thing about where we were looking for polar bears was we were confined to a relatively small area as to where we could look for them. The area backs onto a massive National Park which was a strictly no go area for us. I reckon the bears knew this and they were all hiding in there!!!!

Helpful?
9 Thank Bob-Carol-Pinjarra
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Bombay,India
Level 4 Contributor
23 reviews
14 hotel reviews
common_n_hotel_reviews_1bd8 7 helpful votes
Reviewed November 13, 2011

We were expecting very basic living conditions but were plesantly surprised at how well the lodge was run. Brei gave such fantastic food even for the packed lunch, its commendable. The lack of shower facilities for so many at a time is understandable but on the last night we were shifted into the new lodge.....it was fantastic. Warm beds plenty of hot water in all shower rooms and wider space. Location is perfect, you are right where the bears congregate to head back on the frozen bay. Awesome
The Polar Bear experience is the highpoint of my visit and hats off to Frontiers North Adventures, Merv, Lynda and John.

Room Tip: Simply the best
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  • Stayed November 2011, traveled on business
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Helpful?
3 Thank rash_India
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Fairfield, California
Level 6 Contributor
86 reviews
42 hotel reviews
common_n_hotel_reviews_1bd8 142 helpful votes
Reviewed October 29, 2011

We traveled to Churchill with Frontiers North on Oct. 18, 2011 for the 3-night stay at the Tundra Buggy Lodge. Frontiers North did a great job with logistics -- someone always met us at the appropriate time and place. We were whisked away by bus from the Sheraton in Winnipeg to our charter flight on the runway. Very convenient. In Churchill, we were picked up by an old yellow school bus and taken on our included 'city' tour. The bus was built for 10-year old passengers, so it was a bit cramped. Churchill had just had a dusting of snow, so it was pretty.

After our tour we had an included lunch. Then we had three hours of free time (you could opt for the $515 helicopter ride, $95 dogsledding, or visit the town). We walked around and shopped and found some nice polar gifts. The best buys for me were at the Tundra Buggy Gift Shop. At 4:30 we were picked up by a white school bus and driven to the launch. There we boarded our tundra buggy and met Bob, our guide and driver for the next few days. The tundra buggy is kind of like a giant, extra wide hummer. It had 11 seats on the right side and 9 on the left. Since this is the 'budget' trip, there were 33 of us on board so it was a bit crowded. There is a fire place in one corner and an outhouse style toilet across from it. The journey to the lodge took about 1-1/2 hours. We got a glimpse of a silver fox and a polar bear walking along the 'road'.

Julie, the manager of the lodge, met us before entering the lodge. We were given our bunk assignments and a briefing on what to expect here. The lodge has two bunkhouses, and each sleeps 20 guests. There are 2 toilets and 1 shower per bunkhouse. An aisle divides the bunkhouse with 5 sets of bunkbeds on either side of the aisle. You access the upper bunk by climbing the ladder. Each bunk has a set of denim curtains for privacy, a long shelf, a net, a power outlet, a light and a small window. I was in the upper bunk, and it worked out fine.

After a day out on the buggy, you return to the lodge and have happy hour in the lounge before dinner. Here they serve a few different appetizers, and you can help yourself to wine (merlot in a box), soft drinks or water. There is wireless internet in the lounge, so quite a few people were busy with their laptops and smartphones. Dinner is served in the separate dining car. This contains tables for four. Bree, the head chef, prepared wonderful meals for us. The menu for our three night stay included bison lasagna, arctic char, and elk skewers. They were well informed if anyone any special dietary needs and offered an alternative. Breakfast was served beginning at 7a, and the tundra buggy departed each day at 8a in search of bears. Early morning was a bit crowded in the bunkhouse with people wanting to take showers, brush teeth, and just go potty.

It was great being able to stay at the lodge and be so close to the bears. Unfortunately, we were a bit early in the bear season, and all the snow melted by our second day out there. We had amazing sightings the first day, and everyone got great photos. The other two days the bears were a bit bashful and often fled from the buggy. However, we managed to find a few bears each day and enjoyed spending time with them and taking photos. We saw lots of ptarmigan, arctic fox, arctic hare, and snow buntings. The scenery and landscape was cool. I only wish I could have seen it as a winter wonderland ... next time!

People commented that it would be way too crowded to be on a buggy with 33 people. It worked out fine - everyone was cooperative and respectful. It certainly would NOT have been worth another $3,000 for my own window.

Thanks Bob, Julie, Bree and Tibor - it was amazing!!

Helpful?
8 Thank Pinders
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Tucson, Arizona
Level 6 Contributor
1,852 reviews
172 hotel reviews
common_n_hotel_reviews_1bd8 2,222 helpful votes
Reviewed October 29, 2011

The main reasons to stay at the Tundra Buggy Lodge is for the opportunity to be overnight in the vicinity of polar bears and to avoid a daily, bumpy 90-minute trip from a Churchill motel to the bears and another 90-minute ride back to town. This is a wilderness experience, so expect only basic accommodations.

The lodge consists of specialized modules that stretch for about 300 feet on huge wheels, safely above a polar bear's reach, on the tundra. Each module is hauled out by a tundra buggy at the beginning of the polar-bear season to be hitched to another module. There are two sleeping compartments with bunk beds. One holds 18 passengers and the other holds 20. Each compartment has two flush toilets and one shower. A lounge car (complete with wi-fi) allows socializing, and there is a dining/kitchen car. A tundra buggy dock allows guests to exit from the buggy via its viewing deck into the first sleeping compartment. Thus, no one ever steps on land. For your stay (and safety), you are either in the buggy or in the lodge. I'm an extremely active person so I found it confining to be in such close quarters for about 48 hours.

Re the sleeping compartments, bunks with curtains that can be pulled for privacy, line both sides of a very narrow corridor. Taller people can request one of the few longer bunks. A narrow ledge by each bunk allows storage for small items and there is space for luggage under each bottom bunk. A good light illuminates the bunk area and offers a plug to recharge camera batteries. I found my bunk to be firm and comfortable, but my pillow offered little support. The sheets proved to be coarse and scratchy, but the one blanket provided the necessary warmth for two nights. A corridor closet holds additional blankets for those who need them.

I heard much activity throughout both nights. This included regular toilet use (have to pump the toilet to get water into it before each use) and a chorus of snorers. In the morning, the other guests seemed to have set alarm clocks at 15-minute intervals, as alarms kept going off regularly and started early. Alas, my bunk was located right by the doors to a viewing deck between one sleeping compartment and the next. Guests pushed open the doors, causing a loud bang and a rush of cold Arctic air in my direction. When booking, I recommend requesting a bunk away from the doors. The lodge offers earplugs.

One of the toilets in my compartment smelled strongly of urine after the first night and only got worse for the rest of the stay. The other toilet and the shower area remained fine, though, and the lodge provides each guest with a decent hand and bath towel.

Breakfast consisted of cold and hot items and tea or weak coffee. One night we had excellent bison lasagna for dinner and the other night, flavorless Arctic char. The scrumptious homemade desserts provided a highlight each evening. When returning from a day in the tundra buggy, snacks and boxed white and boxed red wine awaited us. When out in the buggy, a morning coffee break always meant home baked cookies (one each) and coffee, tea or hot chocolate. Lunch in the buggy consisted of soup and make-your-own sandwiches.

Unfortunately, the dining room did not have enough space to hold all the guests. Staff would ask for a few volunteers to eat in the lounge. Our group had bonded well so we missed those who could not join us in the same area for a meal. Three friendly, hard-working staff members worked in the lodge as did our driver/guide after his day in the buggy.

Though many people report on the fun of seeing bears while in the lodge, I saw none from that vantage point. So hope for sightings while lodge dining or socializing, but be prepared to only have that experience when out in the tundra buggy. You will see polar bears from the buggy during the day and other wildlfe, such as foxes, owls and hares.

I did this trip during the third week of October and it was still too warm for large numbers of bears to have gathered in the area. We saw seven bears but no cubs and no playful juveniles. I was told that this had been the same situation at this time last year. Thus, I suggest that potential visitors consider going in early November if that works with their schedule and budget.

Stayed October 2011, traveled solo
Helpful?
8 Thank Rumples
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Naples, Florida
Level 2 Contributor
8 reviews
4 hotel reviews
common_n_hotel_reviews_1bd8 18 helpful votes
Reviewed October 25, 2011

I read all the reviews before booking Tundra Buggy Lodge and I wish TripAdvisor had more than 5 stars to use for rating. My trip was October of 2011, and it was well worth the money. I did a 3 day Adventurer Level tour, and we were out on the tundra in the buggy about 8 hours each day. At times it was slow, but each day there were spectacular photo opportunities. You have to remember that polar bears are very solitary and it’s unusual to see more than one at a time, but when you find one, you may stay with that bear for an hour. We lucked out and had 4 at once with a little drama between them. We also had bears that stood up and leaned on the buggy each day out….bonus! Our driver, Bob, was very knowledgeable and an outstanding animal advocate. We did not have snow on the ground for 2 of our days, but still got superb close up shots of the bears. Saw lots of Arctic foxes, Arctic Hares, and silver foxes.
You definitely need to bring earplugs. They have the foam kind at the Lodge, but for me the best ones are the wax variety like Macks. You can get them at CVS or Walgreens, etc. The sleeping bunks are noisy because of the wind, doors at the ends being opened and closed (at all hours) and the toilets flushing. The water heater also cycles on and off so that’s noisy as well. You won’t sleep the first night, but you probably will the others. We were so excited about the bears and being out in the middle of nowhere that we were up most of the 1st night. The bunks are very firm, pillows not terrific. You might want to bring a pillow. The big guys in our group did get warm in the bunks, but all the small women were cold and needed another blanket. Northern Lights are possible year round when there is a clear sky. We got them the last night and everyone was going through the doors in the middle of the night to view them. Food is incredibly good and plenty of it. Very, very fresh and unusual….bison lasagna, elk kabobs. Fresh veggies and salads, homemade desserts. Huge hot and cold breakfasts. Lunch out on the buggy is homemade soup and sandwiches.

Your feet don’t touch the ground from the moment you get on the buggy to go out to the Lodge until you return. You can wear comfortable shoes the whole time you’re out on the buggy or at the Lodge. However, you definitely will need boots for the time you are in Churchill. It is very cold and there is a good chance you’ll have snow on the ground. You walk everywhere in town, and the wind is bitter. You’ll also need a very warm ski jacket/hat/ gloves for the buggy because when a bear appears, all the windows come down. The routine seemed to be that the people on the “bear” side of the buggy would just stand up and lower their windows to hang out the side and get great shots. The others on the non bear side would either run back to the viewing platform on the back of the buggy or wait until an opening on the “bear” side. Our group was pretty generous with trading out so everyone got a good chance at bear photos. Also, much of the time, the bears are interested in us, too. They literally will circle the buggy so everyone gets a good shot. They’ll sit down, lie down, get back up, stand up and lean on the buggy. Amazing!!!

There was a presentation every night, but my friend and I were so tired after dinner that we went to the bunks and missed that. There is wine provided in the Lounge each night along with hors d’oeuvres . There IS wireless internet now in the Lodge…out in the middle of the tundra!

Our group of 32 represented 6 countries (Spain, U.K., Australia, USA, Italy, Japan) and all of us had been on many adventure trips around the world. You will get great tips for future trips from all the world travelers in your group. I rate this just behind my trips to Africa (which were incredible)…..and that’s only because this was a short trip. It truly is a trip of a lifetime if you love wildlife and adventure.

  • Stayed October 2011, traveled with friends
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Helpful?
11 Thank Jean H
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Winnipeg
Level 5 Contributor
78 reviews
36 hotel reviews
common_n_hotel_reviews_1bd8 115 helpful votes
Reviewed October 30, 2010

Here is the bear truth. The Tundra Buggy Lodge is not the RItz Carlton..why would you even expect that given where you are headed? The experience from Winnipeg to Churchill via air is unremarkable. The bus transfers are standard as is the shopping in Churchill for Polar Bear themed purchases, but once you transfer to the Tundra Buggy heading out on to the frozen tundra trails (former US Military trails - a great form of sustainable tourism use!) you are on your way to the adventure of a lifetime. And I want you to know, as a profession I am a 30 year seasoned hotelier who has managed some upscale boutique hotels. When I travel, I am ultra picky about where I go and where I stay. As the member of a group of people who were looking to collaborate in a unique setting on an emerging business model, I was unsure as to what to expect. Recent reviews on trip advisor really didnt give me what I was looking for - so here is my best attempt at being honest with you. The Tundra Buggy's are big machines that bounch you around like you are in a fun house of sorts. The drivers are experienced and safety in everything that is done both for yourself and for the bears is foremost in the minds of the staff. So if, per chance you are going to be in a needy state of mind, versus, the mind of the explorer...change gears! Nothing and I mean nothing should prevent you from having a wonderful time with Tundra Buggy Tours...Once you arrive at the Lodge..you will find you are in a camp of sorts. Give up your need to be pampered and spolied at the local spa and realize you are in a social experience with other from around the globe - here to celebrate the beauty of the North and the majestic Polar Bear. You will bunk with others, 2 bathrooms per 16 per cabin, 2 bathrooms one common shower, you must use the water sparingly. For the first time in my adult life I didnt shower for 2 days! (only a sponge bath). I slept in the top bunk and that meant I had to climb up and down to use the bathroom a few times in the night. Big deal. The wind blew...yes, it blew so hard that on occasion our door blew open in the night...if people were cold they got an extra blanket. the bunks are comfortable but the space is cramped...but for the love of it all...you're in a different world..put away all your social norms on Hotel living and go back to your childhood...or maybe you are up for a real adventure...You will meet people from around the world...some young..some old..all with interesting reasons why they made it their life quest to come and see the Polar Bears! The meals were healthy and delicious. BYOB...and behave..you are in a special kind of living. Be quiet when you get up in the morning, others are sleeping, help out around the place and dont waste..this is an intimate chance to see one of the great wonders of the world. The Polar Bear - in its natural setting - playful, hopeful, watchful...on the move and in their glory...
So bring your biggest and best camera...be a great ambassador of the globe coming to the Tundra Buggy Lodge with your best attitude about the fact that while it may not be the Ritz it is more special in that you will walk away enriched, enlightened and blessed by the beauty of minimalistic living in the frozen arctic...

  • Stayed October 2010, traveled on business
    • Value
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Helpful?
22 Thank MarinaWinnipeg
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Additional Information about Frontiers North Adventures' Tundra Buggy Lodge

Property: Frontiers North Adventures' Tundra Buggy Lodge
Address: 124 Kelsey Boulevard, Churchill, Manitoba, Canada
Location: Canada > Manitoba > Churchill
Amenities:
Free Breakfast Free High Speed Internet ( WiFi ) Children Activities (Kid / Family Friendly) Shuttle Bus service
Hotel Style:
Ranked #1 of 6 Specialty Lodging in Churchill
Number of rooms: 40
Official Description (provided by the hotel):
The Tundra Buggy(R) Lodge, situated in the heart of polar bear country, offers an unique, immersive experience where guests can fall asleep and wake up with polar bears right outside the window. The lodge consists of two brand new (2012) accommodation units, a lounge and cafe, and staff quarters. Viewing platforms connect each unit and allow for outdoor photography. Situated far from the lights of town, the Tundra Buggy(R) Lodge is the perfect place to view bears all day long and have optimal northern lights viewing at night (weather permitting). The lodge is also equipped with exterior field lights that enable us to continue to watch the bears even after the sun goes down! ... more   less 
Also Known As:
Tundra Buggy Hotel Churchill
Frontiers North Adventures' Tundra Buggy Lodge Churchill, Canada - Manitoba

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