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San Andreas Fault Line

Liverpool, United...
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San Andreas Fault Line

Is there any way I could use public transport to see the San Andreas fault line?

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Los Altos...
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1. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

Well...It's a big, long fault and it goes all over the place. I'm not sure how exciting you will find it.

Here's a little slide show that shows you how mundane the fault line can can look, shot from the air, above the towns just south of San Francisco: San Bruno and South San Francisco, and on down the SF Peninsula:

cbs5.com/slideshows/local_slideshow_250212024

There are some streets up in the Santa Cruz mountains that ruptured during the 1989 Loma Prieta quake (the one that made international news on Oct. 17, 1989), but they're not easy to get to without a car. As close as I am to them, I've never gone looking for them.

Maybe you'd like to take a photo tour of the whole thing, at least quite a bit of it. This starts down in Baja California and works its way up north, into the San Francisco Bay Area.

In the SF Bay Area and Monterey Bay Area you're looking for (south to north): Pinnacles National Monument, Hollister, Berkeley (Hayward Fault), Tomales Bay:

…ucsb.edu/collections/…indexOLD3.htm

The little town of Parkfield in Monterey county, where scientists think the next big seismic activity will take place, has had a battery of scientific equipment installed there. But it's a bit of a haul to get down there, and frankly, without a car, I don't really know if it's worth it. You can probably buy some souvenirs in Parkfield because of that, but it's waaaaay down there in the middle of nowhere (so to speak):

livescience.com/forcesofnature/041209_earthq…

I guess the easiest thing to do would be to go over to UC Berkeley, via BART and walk around the stadium... It's the easiest thing to do. It's the Hayward Fault here, just fyi.

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2. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

The best way to see it is from the air over the middle of the state. Point Reyes at Bear Station and Crystal Springs Reservior have spots where you can see fence posts that cross the fault that demonstrate how far the earth moved that day a little over a hundred years ago. You could take public transit to (near) Crystal Springs, but it would be very complicated and involve a lot of walking.

You can take public transportation to San Bruno/Daly City, but you can't see the fault because it is all covered with houses and buildings.

jacksonville fl
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3. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

BetterThanBings, you have outdone yourself! The UC Santa Barbara link offers an excellent tour of the fault. Great pix, tho I couldn't pull up some of the slides for some reason. I'm planning a visit to your area--we touch down in SF in a mere 10 days--and DW indicated a desire to look at the faultline somewhere. When we drove down I-280 many years ago on our way from SFO to San Jose with my stepsister & her husband, we saw a roadside sign, "San Andreas Lake." We were informed that, yes, it was THAT San Andreas. I must admit, it was impressive when we realized that we were basically driving along the famous fault line.

I looked at another (inferior) field trip guide a few weeks ago, and came to the same conclusion that you BTB has: seeing the fault features involves a lot of effort for not so much reward--and that's with a car. Nonetheless, we thought we'd take a crack at it. We'll be driving that same route when we leave SF & head toward Monterey & Big Sur. From the map it looks like you can stop at/near the Crystal Springs Reservoir. Can anyone tell us how to get to where the shifted fence posts are that WesTylerGM mentioned? Thx, BD

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4. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

BetterthanBings: Ditto.

Kauai, Hawaii
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5. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

Anyone driving to Monterey could dash over 152 or 156 to Hollister and San Juan Bautista Mission from Watsonville. The view of the scarp from the mission is impressive and especially the deformations on the streets and old buildings in Hollister too.

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6. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

Ok, this link will be of little help to Deano.bigfella, but for anyone with a car, a careful reading, some Googling for some of the broken links, and a good map of San Mateo County, SF Peninsula, this site may get you somewhere. I know if I spent the time I could explore around here pretty easily. At the very least, you can drive up Page Mill Road in Palo Alto, and it's just off of I-280:

…stanford.edu/oldsep/joe/fault_images/BayAre…

Deano, the best option for you would be UC Berkeley. BART to the Berkeley station, walk up Bancroft Avenue from University Ave, and to the stadium area...

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7. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

And try these 2 links:

www.nps.gov/pore/pdf/educate_curr_geo_on.pdf

earthquake.usgs.gov/learning/topics.php…

jacksonville fl
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8. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

Using the terrific link provided by the ever-helpful BTB, I found a better version of the document I mentioned earlier, which outlines several regional field trips that show the San Andreas and related faults and the effects of earthquake activity in this fascinating area:

http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1127/

Still looking for the offset posts in the Crystal Springs Reservoir area!

San Francisco...
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9. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

I was looking for information on the Crystal Springs posts too. It was several years ago and we were on the bike trail on the path between Crystal Springs and San Andreas Reserviors. I remember seeing a sign about the fault and the earthquake. Maybe my memory is failing me. However, I have been to Pt. Reyes recently and they definately have the fence posts and little walking path tour all about the 1906 quake and San Andreas Fault.

Kauai, Hawaii
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10. Re: San Andreas Fault Line

I worked a Daly City medical facility when the 1989 quake occurred and shook the daylilghts out of our new four-story building. Did not sleep in anything but street clothes for about a month and hung a plumb bob on my chandelier. Currently I live on the Moss Beach/San Gregorio Fault (two blocks away) and I am always interested in what anyone has to say, to know more and to keep refreshing my emergency batteries, H2O and rations. Gosh, enough about me!

When I realized how many neat sites you all were citing, I found this cool aerial photo on Yahoo:

www.aerialarchives.com/stock/img/AHLB2130.htm

BTB..I think the Cal Berkeley stadium is a good recommendation for public transportation. I wonder if that dig on the Hayward Fault is still open to public viewing.