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Pets and hiking trails

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Las Vegas
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Pets and hiking trails

Are there any rules against bringing your dog on a hike with you? Leashed and with potty bags of course!

Just curious if there are any pet un-friendly trails to stay away from.

Thanks!!

Sedona, AZ
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for Sedona, Arizona, Monument Valley
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1. Re: Pets and hiking trails

Leashes and potty bags are a must. Beyond that, you're on your own. The biggest concern is wildlife and for this reason, walking your dog on local trails is discouraged.

Coyotes, Bobcats and Mountain Lions are all native to the area and have no fear of you or your dog. In fact the dogs are appetizing and in recent years there have been many documented attacks and killings in and around Sedona.

There are fenced and protected dog parks in Sedona and I recommend you use these for Fido.

I'm not trying to scare you, but I myself have lost two Yorkies to coyotes. My Dr had his dog snatched from the leash. Dont think that a bigger dog is safe either. Wild animals understand the element of surprise and use it. These aren't tales. They are real events. And nothing is more heartbreaking than losing a pet that way.

Harleysville...
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2. Re: Pets and hiking trails

Red Rock Crossing is a good place to take your dog. You will see lots of them there, especially in warmer weather. Many of them like to jump in the water there. We always go there with our dog and have also done Boynton Canyon, Bell Rock and Mags Draw.

Sedona, AZ
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3. Re: Pets and hiking trails

I agree with the other response. Also consider taking the dogs on lesser traveled trails and there are speeding bikers, others dogs, and other people that may aggrivate your dogs. Bell Rock Pathway has a lot of incidents with dogs. However, if you are here in the slow season you have nothing to worry about.

Sedona
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4. Re: Pets and hiking trails

Be alert for bikes at Bell Rock. Sometimes they come up pretty quickly, and it could be a problem if your dog is on an extended leash. We have walked our dogs there: just be aware of the situation.

Edited: 11:41 pm, January 21, 2012
Chicago
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for Pompano Beach
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5. Re: Pets and hiking trails

I've seen dogs hiking on Bear Mountain, Soldier's Pass, and Brins Mesa. I would think Doe Mountain and perhaps Baldwin/Templeton would be reasonably safe. I've seen coyotes near Boynton, Fay and along the road to Devil's Bridge. I agree with RR, there is definitely a risk bringing your pet along.

Sedona, AZ
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6. Re: Pets and hiking trails

If you want to stay away from speeding bikes and big crowds choose trails that are in Wilderness designated areas. Bikes or other mechanical vehicle or devices are allowed in Wilderness.

Marges Draw

Doe Mt. Fay Canyon

Boynton Canyon

Bear Mt.

Brins Mesa

RRX makes a good but painful point about coyotes but these trails are well traveled not very likely to host coyotes, bears, cats, etc. Your biggest concern should be your dog getting to close to prickly pair cacti. It's horrible to see and hear a suffering dog with cacus spines in its nose.

Sedona, AZ
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7. Re: Pets and hiking trails

Prickly Pear is painful. Cholla is even worse.

FYI the fatal coyote attacks on my two Yorkies didn't happen on a trail. It happened in our residential neighborhood near the Chapel, in the vacant lot next door to my own house. It was one of the most heart breaking events in my life.

tucson az
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for Tucson, Arizona, Northern Mexico
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8. Re: Pets and hiking trails

Unfortunately, as my buddy RedRox above experienced, coyotes come into populated areas. I live in central Tucson in a fairly densely populated residential area. We see coyotes in our alleys and utility easements frequently here, even javelinas. Coyotes make meals of small dogs, cats and chickens that aren't well-protected. They do not approach people, however.

Arizona
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for Scottsdale
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9. Re: Pets and hiking trails

We live in suburban Scottsdale and one afternoon in my backyard my elderly Westie terrier, who was mostly blind and deaf at the time, was under our orange tree. I was outside with him and heard a really loud "swooping" noise and then saw a huge hawk scream down from my rooftop and land just 6 ft from my little 18 lb dog and start hopping towards him. I was able to scare the bird away, but he had serious intentions to attack my dog. I doubt he could have carried him away, but he would have tried and badly injured him no doubt and if i had not been there it would have been disastrous.

Harleysville...
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10. Re: Pets and hiking trails

We are part time in Fountain Hills and coyotes are frequent visitors as are mountain lions. Early December while walking around fountain park early in the morning, which is always crowded with walkers, many with their dogs, a coyote walked right in front of me and my Westie but just kept going. There were a lot of shocked walkers, myself included. I use to walk very early through some of the neighborhoods and always carried a large rock with me, but after a scary stare down with a coyote I now only go to the park where there are a lot of people.

Last year in May while sitting with a group in our hot tub in our complex, a mountain lion walked right by us - we were behind a fence, thank goodness. He walked to a water fountain in our complex, took a drink and turned around and walked away.

I am always appalled to read in our paper how coyotes get a hold of little dogs who are left alone in their yard. I would never leave my dog alone out there for any reason.