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Bariloche Trip

Virginia
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11 posts
27 reviews
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Bariloche Trip

We traveled to Bariloche fromBuenos Aires. We had to plan a rather remote trip based on that our daughter is an exchange student in a remote part of Patagonnia and our trip was to visit her. We found little info on the internet which is why I'm posting this. DO NOT DRIVE ACROSS ARGENTINA! We did this and the roads are very dangerous 2 lanes and people passing within 10 seconds of hitting the on coming car at 100 mile per hour! My daughter knows of 3 families in her small town that lost a member due to an accident. In Addition there are no gas stations, after 8 hours of driving you get to a state run gas station w/ no food or water but thankfully we got gas before we ran out. The scenery for 12 hours resembled New Mexico absolutely nothing to look at. As you head further into Patagonia the road turns to dirt, rocks and dust galore. Bariloche is gorgeous but very touristy like the small towns outside of grand canyon or Estes park. If you must travel to this area I would head 3 hours farther to San Martin which has a less touristy feel, and the same beauty. Or if you are going out of your way skip this area all together. It's just too touristy and you can get a lot of similar offerings in the US .

Argentina
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129 posts
23 reviews
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1. Re: Bariloche Trip

@HappyWandererVA,

First you say don't go to the remote parts of Patagonia because there is nothing but dirt roads and dust, then you say don't go to touristy parts like Bariloche because they are overcrowded. Argentine Patagonia is famous for its remoteness and dry baron landscape. Yes, Bariloche is crowded; that's because there are so many options for the tourist to see and do. San martin de los Andes is quieter compared to Bariloche but then there is less to see and do there as well...

I work in tourism and don't know of many people who drive from BA to Bariloche and further south across the remote parts of Patagonia, most people either take the bus or fly to the main towns and points of interest then explore from there before getting back on the bus or flight to the next point of interest.

As you said yourself you had to go to a remote part of Patagonia with the purpose of visiting your daughter. I'm sure there weren't many other tourist there because your daughter was staying in such a remote place that other tourist don't generally visit, so what the need to tell other not to go there...

The roads are the same throughout Argentina, not just in Patagonia in terms of dangerous drivers, any guidebook will tell you that.

You compare Patagonia to parts of your home country and suggest people should just travel to the USA, but there are many travellers who aren't from the USA and would rather travel to Argentina than the USA.

Edited: 8:15 pm, January 02, 2013
Punta Gorda, Florida
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2 posts
3 reviews
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2. Re: Bariloche Trip

I am in Bariloche,Argentina right now, I arrived by bus from Buenas Aires, on 17 January. The rental car agent brought my car to the airport. This already did not have a cozy feeling and then hit me with only a quarter tank of gas. Another uneasy feeling came over me, but I went ahead with the rental. What can go wrong in something so simple, the first gas station had no super blend, so I went completly across town, a tanker had just got there and it was off loading, and there was a one more mile line of cars waiting to get gas, this was today at 10 AM on 18 January, I went back to my hotel and walked to the Tourist info office downtown, I explained my gas situation to the lady, so she gave some detailed city street layouts and then told me where the gas stations were located. She stated she never has any problems getting gas, I guess she does not try on a Friday and perhaps any time on a weekend day. You should only come to Bariloche as a backpacker this time of year, probably the same way during the ski season, so beware! The people are very nice and the food you are served is also excellent, just donot try to tour the area with a car.

Punta Gorda, Florida
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2 posts
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3. Re: Bariloche Trip

I am in Bariloche,Argentina right now, I arrived by bus from Buenas Aires, on 17 January. The rental car agent brought my car to the airport. This already did not have a cozy feeling and then hit me with only a quarter tank of gas. Another uneasy feeling came over me, but I went ahead with the rental. What can go wrong in something so simple, the first gas station had no super blend, so I went completly across town, a tanker had just got there and it was off loading, and there was a one more mile line of cars waiting to get gas, this was today at 10 AM on 18 January, I went back to my hotel and walked to the Tourist info office downtown, I explained my gas situation to the lady, so she gave some detailed city street layouts and then told me where the gas stations were located. She stated she never has any problems getting gas, I guess she does not try on a Friday and perhaps any time on a weekend day. You should only come to Bariloche as a backpacker this time of year, probably the same way during the ski season, so beware! The people are very nice and the food you are served is also excellent, just donot try to tour the area with a car.

Stanley, Falkland...
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32,767 posts
75 reviews
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4. Re: Bariloche Trip

I agree with jez. There's no point in telling me to stay and drive around New Mexico. I prefer somewhere like Bariloche, which is like a Swiss village by a stunning lake, surrounded by mountains. Is there really somewhere like that in the US?

How easy is it to get into the US these days?

Fife
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29 posts
42 reviews
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5. Re: Bariloche Trip

Bariloche looks nothing like a Swiss village, feels nothing like one and is an unfair representation to travellers who may be tempted by the description which is also is evident in many guide books.

Mendoza, Argentina
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469 posts
3 reviews
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6. Re: Bariloche Trip

No, it is not like a Swiss village, and I find Bariloche a bit touristy, but the astounding nature in the forests and the lakes are a hundred times nicer than anywhere in Switzerland.

Level Contributor
26 posts
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7. Re: Bariloche Trip

Something wrong with New Mexico? I think it's beautiful. I long for the day I get to visit Patagonia. I think there's something wrong with YOU

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8. Re: Bariloche Trip

Something wrong with New Mexico? I think it's beautiful. I long for the day I get to visit Patagonia. I think there's something wrong with YOU

WDC
Destination Expert
for Buenos Aires
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4,282 posts
61 reviews
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9. Re: Bariloche Trip

I cannot but agree that Bariloche town itself was of little interest to us.

However, we flew from BsAs, rented a car and had a glorious week in the AREA of Bariloche. We visited (and stayed in) several towns in the area; took hikes, drives and (yes touristic) boat crossing to the forest. We ate quite well and were pleased to have chosen to spend the week in the Bariloche area.

Spaniel: no need, IMO, to be verbally insulting to a poster with an opinion to offer, albeit one that differs from yours. I think Happy Wanderer presents a clear view of why the drive they took was unpleasant - and it encourages other visitors to find other means to getting to Bariloche.

Australia
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250 posts
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10. Re: Bariloche Trip

Hi there - amusing thread and well written.

After a lot of indecision re destination my husband and I have decided to do our first trip to South America in Oct / Nov this year - Chile, Brazil and Argentina. Only a month, so just a taster of an enormous and diverse continent. Mostly the usual attractions - they're attractions for a reason.

My husband is mad for Latin jazz and very keen to go to Brazil. We're interested in cultural heritage, and would love to see great scenery. Coming from Australia, we're also keen to sample some other "new world" wines.

But back to the point of this post, we're looking at going from BA to Bariloche and then doing the lake crossing into Chile and flying to Santiago from there. We have travelled a lot in Europe and Asia and "touristy" doesn't appeal, but the landscape sounds breathtaking and well worth it.

I also thought about going west to Mendoza from BA and then crossing back into Chile from there.

Currently thinking

- Chile: Santiago and environs, Atacama

- Brazil: RJ; Pantanal; Paraty; I/Falls; Brasilia? Salvador?

- Agentina: BA - see query above

Any advice appreciated by this novice. Thanks.