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Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

Tel Aviv, Israel
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Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

We are planning to visit Peninsula Valdes in the beginning of October, rent-a-car for 3 days and visit the peninsula and Ponta Tombo . We read that most roads are gravel roads.

1.DO we need a 4WD or a normal car is enough ?

2.Are the gravel roads there in a normal condition in the beginning of October ?

3. What car rental company is recommended in Trelew (we fly to Trelew) with the ability to make insurance with minimal deductable and unlimited kms ?

Kathmandu, Nepal
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1. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

Bumping this up and hoping to attract some replies from Patagonians!

Argentina
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for Buenos Aires, Argentina
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2. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

Hello,

As a local (*) driving own car, I can tell you that no 4WD is necessary, and that gravel roads are o.k.

(MY worst fear on those roads, is to break a windshield, and in fact, I never have!)

Cannot help you concerning rentals ... sorry.

(*) local Argentinian. Been to Peninsula Valdez a few times, but I live in Buenos Aires.

uk
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3. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

i maybe to late BUT, we hired a car from trewlew last october - landed late pm drove to maydren in a 'normal hire car' hired from the airport.. we drove then to piridymides and stayed , then drove around the peninsular......no probs.. if i can help message me...

we hired from the airport with avis- all arranged via email... they ( or he- a 1 man show) was SO helpful, as our flight was delayed and we rang to keep the car an extra 6 hrs before returning to the airport- this was NO problem...

enjoy the whale trip from puerto pyridimides.. ( sorry cant remember the spelling.)

Kathmandu, Nepal
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4. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

Thanks, julieei, this is helpful!

San Diego...
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5. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

We rented a car from the local Avis agency in Puerto Madryn explicitly for driving the Valdes Peninsula. The roads on the Peninsual are gravel and rocky. A rock damaged the fuel line while driving on the Peninsula. Consequently, the car had to be towed and we hitched a ride from some good Samaritans. The rental contract was in Spanish, no English version could be provided despite the comment at the bottom of the Spanish version. By drving the car off paved roads the contract was therfore voided (we found out weeks later) and we were liable for towing, repair bill, and the rental charge. We took out extra insurance for just such an eventuality but it didn't apply. The agent spoke little English and assured us he would contact us if there was any sort of extra charge. He didn't do this. RENTER BEWARE!

Utrecht, The...
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6. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

Hello rata_18

I want to go to Peninsula Valdes at the end of November and wondered how you eventually experienced the roads... ?

Is it necessary to rent a car of is public transport/taxi sufficient enough?

Thanks!

Prague, Czech...
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7. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

¨Hello,

we were in Peninsula Valdes last November and we hired a car in Puerto Madryn. It´s the easiest way as you can decide where you want to stop and how much time you want to spend there.

No 4WD is necessary, it´s gravel. You will start really slow and eventually learn to drive more quickly but I don´t recommend driving faster then 70km/hour.

Karel

Merlo, Argentina
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8. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

Some recommendations for driving around Península Valdés:

- Before embarking on a full tour is important to refuel at the gas station at Puerto Piramides.

- It's recommended to drive with extreme caution in the gravel to a maximum speed of 60km / h

- Drivers are reminded to keep the low lights on and mandatory use of seat belt.

- Pay attention to the presence of wild animals (sheep, horses, guanacos) on both sides of the road.

[From Puerto Madryn official site madryn.gov.ar/turismo/…index.php in Spanish]

TheHague
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9. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

Driving on gravel is perfectly fine in any vehicle, no need to get a 4WD. The only problems are going around bends too fast, driving or parking too close to the edge of the road and braking suddenly when travelling fast. Provided you don't exceed 60-70 km/h, this won't be too much of a problem, just treat it like driving on snow and you'll be fine. If a vehicle is approaching, slow down to a halt gradually, that way there is little chance of any stones smashing your windscreen.

Avis at Trelew Airport rented us a VW Gol, which was fine for the Valdes tracks.

Lunenburg, Canada
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for Saint John, Foz do Iguacu, Iguazu National Park
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10. Re: Car driving in Peninsula Valdes roads

You'll find that driving on gravel roads in Argentina is no different than driving on dirt roads in North America. Some car rental companies in Argentina seem to suggest that you'd face an elevated risk of overturning the car on a "ripio" or gravel road, but we found that it's no more hazardous than on a dirt road at home. We think you'd have a higher risk of flipping the car on a high-speed paved highway, in case you ever had to swerve in an emergency.

You just drive a speed with which you're comfortable, always being mindful of turns in the road and occasional oncoming cars. The biggest problems with dirt roads are the potholes and washboard, and possibly a bit of flying gravel.

We found that guanaco know to stay out of the way of cars. In this regard, they're smarter than deer in North America and kangaroos in Australia. Domestic animals may occasionally wander near the road, but if you're driving at a sensible speed for a gravel road, you won't have any problem. Sheep run from cars. Impetuous baby animals are a bigger risk, because they may not have learned yet not to run into the road, but it's not difficult to avoid hitting them. In any case, farm animals are usually fenced. The owner doesn't want his valuable livestock getting killed any more than you want to hit them.

Happy travels!

David