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Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

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Whangarei, New...
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Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Ok this is a specialised subject.As a cattle farmer in New Zealand I want to visit the Liniers Cattle Market on our week long visit in May.I am having a lot of trouble finding a guide who will take me ,can anyone help?

Thanks,

Neville

Abilene, Texas
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21. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

I read the article linked by Cathie which does a good job of describing the reasons why grass fed beef was readily available in Argentina but not in the United States. Sadly, the conditions described in the article no longer exist. Much of the pasture land has been converted to cultivated farm land for growing Soy, mostly for export. The majority cattle are now sent to feed lots for finishing, just like in the United States. This has changed the quality and taste of beef in Argentina. These days a steak from a parrilla in Buenos Aires tastes remarkably like a steak from a steak house in Dallas.

Neville, maybe you could ask your guide about her insights about this trend and whether it is likely to continue? As a cattleman, I would be interested in your thoughts about the grass fed vs grain finished beef as well.

Rio de Janeiro, RJ
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22. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Neville, you would be surprised by how many ranchers speak English and how hospitable they would be to a "colleague" from abroad. You would get invited to a lot of functions and meals that you would probably find very informative and entertaining. Just my belief (as I don't raise cattle).

Edited: 9:57 am, April 05, 2012
Rio de Janeiro, RJ
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23. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

@Dr D,

About 12 years ago I wrote an article for the BA Herald's "Get Out" weekend supplement on Parrillas. As part of my research, besides eating free at most of the city's well known parrillas (thanks to the Herald), I interviewed numerous ranchers, slaughter house, and restaurant owners.

Even back then it was common to send pampas raised animals to a feed lot for the last month before auction to finish them (fatten them up). Animals would gain a kilo or more per day during this time frame and round out their bodies for auction weigh in.

What appears to be happening these days is for animals to be spend much longer periods of time in feed lot. Not only does that affect the flavor, but it also affects tenderness. Ideally, an animal should have the beneficial exercise of walking from grassy spot to grassy spot on flat pasture land to produce the desired amount of fat aka marbling. A hilly pasture will require too much effort and will create too muscular an animal - the meat will be tougher. The flatness together with the plentiful alfalfa produced by a rich soil and good growing climate are the reasons the pampas is ideal for cattle production.

The lack of proper exercise of feed lot raised beef will result in excessive fattiness and a lower quality of protein. The fat of feed lot beef will often have a yellowish tint.

The age of the animal will also affect tenderrness. The older the animal, the less tender it will be, but older animals are more flavorful so there is a balancing between tenderness and flavor that also takes into account the cost of maintaining the animals especially during the winter. Most cattle, novillos, are shipped to Liniers at 20-22 months having been raised over just one winter. The average weight is about 400-425 kilos.

The manner in which they are trucked to and kept at Liniers also affects the flavor as does the manner in which they are slaughtered. Going from a relatively tranquil pasture or feedlot in a crowded truck to the frenzy of Liniers will cause stress resulting in excessive adrenalin in the blood. This will negatively affect the flavor of the beef so it's preferable to let them rest a day or two after arrival and before slaughter, but as they are not eating this will also produce stress/ adrenalin so too much delay will be counter productive.

Edited: 10:40 am, April 05, 2012
Nice, France
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24. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Maria,

I'll soon celebrate my 40th anniversary of being a vegetarian. And I appreciate how informative your lesson in meat production is. Thank you.

san diego
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25. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Poor cows.

But on another note, I haven't seen the subject of aging of the beef discussed here. Dry vs. wet, preferred number of days, etc., is it done here?

Ok that's off topic a bit, sorry.

Abilene, Texas
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26. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Maria, Thanks. Three other health issues that concerns me: Firstly, Cattle pressed together in feed lots for extended periods of time are more prone to disease. Feed lot operators use antibiotics in large quantities to reduce communicable diseases. Secondly, I do not know whether Argentine feed lot owners have adopted this tactic or not but elsewhere it is not uncommon to inject cattle with growth hormones to speed up weight gain. Thirdly, beef from feed lot finished cattle tends to have higher levels of cholesterol. Sigh.

Buenos Aires...
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27. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Hi Neville!!!

I started googling about why I am getting so many people contacting me to tour them around the Cattle Market!! thank you for your nice reviews!! and hope to see you and Donna again in Argentina!!!!!

Saludos

Maria

Edited: 1:15 pm, August 08, 2012
Whangarei, New...
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28. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Hi Maria,

We really enjoyed our time with you at the market.It was a real highlight for me.

For those that are not into farming i would highly recommend that they go out to the Feria on the Sunday.It is a great market with food cooked on the streets and the locals get into their folk dancing.

Preferred this market to the one at San Telmo we went back to later.

We took the tube out as far as it went then got a taxi.Being a Sunday it was hassle free.

Hope to get back someday.

Regards,

Neville

Buenos Aires...
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29. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Hola!!!!!!

I still receive a lot of people interested in visiting the Cattle Market. thanks a lot for the nice reviews

Saludos!!!!

Maria Corbalan.

Buenos Aires...
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30. Re: Guide for tour of Liniers Cattle Market

Note that I ve changed my email!!!

You can find the new one on linkedIn...

Saludos,