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moving

Manila, Philippines
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moving

This is for Dr.D if you can help, we just came back from our trip to BA and loved it so much that we actually plan to move the family there, two kids 4 and 8, they are at the moment studying in an international school and I would need the same in BA they will take spanish as a second language and should be fine. Two questions, do you have addresses of schools and how about about the residence permit or whatever you call it, (we are all Swiss Citizens). I believe the country has huge potentials and sometimes you have to make bold steps in live.

Thanks for your reply, Sumis

Buenos Aires...
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1. Re: moving

Doc, this question's addressed to you, but, if you don't mind, I'll answer it at least in part. Well, if you DO mind, I'll answer anyway! LOL!!!!!

This is the website of the school where the sons of all foreigners go to in Buenos Aires: http://www.lincoln.edu.ar/index.html

Hope this helps. I'm not the Doc, but....

Buenos Aires...
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2. Re: moving

I'm not DD either, and I'm not sure how complicated it gets for families, but I'll answer from my perspective as a single person who is in mid-process for this; and probably run on a bit.

First, it depends on what you want to do here. I applied only for residency, not for a work permit - as a writer I still sell everything back in the U.S., so my income is there. Officially, that means I'm a retiree. The paperwork needed for that is not all that extensive, it's just tedious to obtain:

Certified Birth Certifiicate with Apostille

Good Conduct Certificate from the Federal Police in your country with Apostille

Good Conduct Certificate from the local police here once you have a set address

Copy of your passport

I needed to open a local bank account and show a deposit of $1000 a month to show that I had "sufficient funds" to live as a retiree; and also provide a financial report for my U.S. bank/investment accounts. For a work permit you wouldn't need that.

All documents need to be translated into Spanish by an officially registered translator and certified at the College of Translators. An Apostille is bascially a certification issued by your own government to certify that the certified copies are really certified (things are silly here sometimes).

After that, it's either waiting in line and paying relatively minimal fees, or having a service, like a lawyer's office, do it for you.

The work permit, or DNI, requires the same paperwork, though is processed differently. And there are a limited number of them given out during each official time period. I'm not sure what that amount is.

Now, if you don't need to work, you also don't need to obtain the residency. I'm doing it for personal reasons that aren't worth getting into. You can live here, you can buy property here, and you can remain a non-resident. The only catch there is that you need to leave the country once every 90 days to renew your visa. That said, you can do that as simply as taking the ferry one hour to Colonia in Uruguay, having lunch and coming back on the later ferry. Or, if you travel around S. Amer. enough, you'll pretty much take care of it anyway. The other thing is that every other time you can actually go to the official visa office here (there are some restrictions on timing), pay a minor fee, and renew it there. So you actually only have to physically leave every 180 days. The fine, by the way, for overstaying your 90-day visa, is 50 pesos per person at the time you do actually exit (there may be a limit on how long you can actually be late and get away with just that fine, I'm not sure).

I'm sure I missed something in there, but that seemed to be it. (Oh, then of course, there's an inordinately complicated process if you want to bring your household goods here...)

Abilene, Texas
Destination Expert
for Buenos Aires
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3. Re: moving

I am so glad that I am late to this thread. The not-DD posters had much more information about this topic than I could have possibly provided. Thanks AV and SAltshaker.

Buenos Aires...
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4. Re: moving

Aw, c'mon Doc, you can do better than that!!!

Branford...
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5. Re: moving

Salty:

If you are a resident are you eligible for public health care or better to purchased private Argentine health insurance? Are there other public servies you would not be eligible for if you were not an official resident? Free tuition, discounted in country airfare, etc?

Do you have to pay any Argentine income tax?

Can you put your $1000 into a branch of a US bank or an Argentine bank? Do you have to keep a minimum balance?

Can you be a retiree and work?

What if you are married to an Argentine national? Do the rules change?

Thanks.

Baltimore, MD
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6. Re: moving

Sumis,

I graduated from Lincoln School in BA, and of the seven schools that I attended in Latin America, it was one of the best. At the time, Lincoln School had less of an international focus, more inclined to serve the needs of students who required the accreditation that Lincoln offered, to continue their studies in the US. My family (Swiss parents, too) lived in Montevideo, but my sister and I lived with an Anglo Argentine family in BA and went to Lincoln School, and went back to Montevideo on weekends. I checked their website again today, and the focus has definitely shifted to be much more inclusive and international, offering Bachillerato, etc. In any case, the level of teaching was excellent, especially in the foreign language department. Hope this helps.

Buenos Aires...
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7. Re: moving

Public health care is already open to foreigners, if you really want to go to a public hospital. I can't say that my view of them is particularly high. On the other hand, purchasing a "plan" at a private hospital is, by comparison to U.S. prices anyway, quite inexpensive, and foreigners can also purchase plans (they work sort of like an HMO with a specific hospital - you pay the hospital a monthly fee and from there, you go to that hospital for everything).

Tuition is also quite inexpensive, even for foreigners, and residency, or a student DNI gets you full privileges. My partner is Peruvian, but he didn't pay any tuition at the public university in La Plata, just had to go through the DNI process.

Buenos Aires...
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8. Re: moving

mmm... further thoughts. I don't pay Argentine income tax, but then again, they have no way of knowing that I'm earning money in the U.S. As far as they know, I'm living off of longterm savings. If I earned money here and was paid on the books, I'd have to pay taxes.

you can put the money in any bank that's here, irrelevant whether it's a foreign bank or an argentine bank. they're separate corporations - one of the fun things you'll find here, i.e., they're really separate. while, for example, citibank u.s. and citibank argentina may both be owned by citicorp, you have no direct access to your u.s. account from here, other than using an atm card - you can't make deposits, or do anything else. same is true of all the major foreign banks as far as i know - bank boston, bank paribas, hsbc, etc...

I know that marriage used to be one way of automatically getting resident status. Someone posted over on the BA newcomer's board a while back that that option has been eliminated, and you now have to go through the whole process like anyone else, it's just unlikely that you'd be denied the residency, which is always a possibility for anyone else. I'm not 100% sure about that though, never checked it out myself.

Manila, Philippines
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9. Re: moving

Thanks to all you guys, great info this really helps, am very happy to hear about the school because this is really the most important aspect which has to be addressed.

We will not need a work permit and will just go with the retiree scheme that seems to be the easiest way and going to Colonia every 90 or 180 days to renew the visa is just too funny.

Again thanks so very much will contact you once the move is completed.

Sumis

Branford...
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10. Re: moving

Yes thank you for the information. I am a 56 year old IT Manager in a large insurance company and I keep hoping that someday they will offer us an early out (no early retirement penalty and benefits). If they do I would like to live at least part of the year in Argentina if not just move there and live for a few years. My wife is Argentine and she is becoming Americanized. She is a teacher in a local public school teaching English as a second language (she taught English as a foreign language in Argentina). I think she likes our crazy pace. So that is a hard sell. She is not as anxious to move back immediately but she realizes that even a modest pension goes a lot father there than in the states.

Again...thanks. This information was impossible to find online. One of my pet projects (its on the list) is to create a small website with information for Americans traveling or considering emigrating to Argentina. One of these days...maybe when I am retired.