We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.
We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

El Alto - trip report part 4

Which La Paz hotels are on sale?
mm/dd/yyyy mm/dd/yyyy
See hotels
Scunthorpe, United...
Level Contributor
1,733 posts
78 reviews
Save Topic
El Alto - trip report part 4

This follows on from the trip report written for Sucre:

tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowTopic-g295432-i7975-k3…

We flew from Sucre to La Paz. There was a good view from the plane over Sucre as it climbed up off the plateau. We could see the plateau below us with cultivated fields and deeply dissected ravines. As we climbed above the mountains the settlements were left behind and there were a few roads climbing up to the ridge and running along the tops. As we flew further north, snow covered the mountain tops. A few settlements appeared in the valley bottoms.

We could see La Paz sprawling along a narrow canyon with the newer and much bigger town of El Alto on the plateau. La Paz airport is built on the high plateau at an altitude of 4061m so anyone not acclimatised to high altitude may have problems. Cars picking up tourists carry oxygen - just in case.

We had ready horror stories about the shanty town of EL ALTO which was where the indigenous population lived and which was unsafe for tourists. Cost of accommodation in La Paz means that many of the non native population are moving there to live. In fact it was much nicer than we expected. The streets were wide but always full of traffic and mini buses. These stop without warning to drop off or pick up passengers. Shops sprawled onto the pavement and into the street. The Bolivians are great traders. Anyone can set up a stall and sell things. Gradually as they make money they buy a shop with living quarters above. There is plenty of space around the buildings to allow for a yard and expansion as the business grows. Everyone does a year’s military service where they learn a trade and more important building skills. As trade improves the shop and house gets larger. This can take a long time as it is all self built. We saw many half built houses which would gradually be finished off when time and money allowed. Most houses were 3-4 storeys high but some grew to 6 storeys. Houses were built from bricks and the standard of bricklaying varied tremendously. Some houses were painted outside but many were left unpainted as we were told the owner had to pay extra tax if the house was painted.

We stopped for a view across La Paz before dropping down into valley. The sides of the canyon are very unstable and liable to slip so there is little building up them. The Rio Choqueyapu runs along the valley bottom but much of it has been culverted and built over. The river is heavily polluted and in one place the side stream into the river was deep purple pink with pollutants.

There are two big markets in El Alto. The most important market is on A Thursday; the Sunday market is smaller. We had a full day tour of La Paz with our guide on a Thursday and knowing we were interested in getting away from the usual tourist attractions and were interested in markets we changed the itinerary and spent the morning around El Alto market.

The Thursday market is huge and is the largest market in Bolivia. As we drove up the side of the Canyon from La PAz we could see the market stretching the length of El Alto as far as the eye could see. It is purely a local market. We were the only Gringos, but attracted little attention. Mini buses loaded with passengers and goods were parked everywhere. Stalls filled the streets. We left the car and walked. We started in the furniture section selling everything from tables to beds, wardrobes and huge cabinets plus also specially commissioned pieces. All of these are made in small workshops. The workers learn by doing as apprentices in a bigger workshop. As they gain experience they open their own small shop/workshop with living quarters above. As business expands they open a proper shop, start to employ apprentices and build a larger house

Young people setting up a home buy all their furniture from places like this. Getting some of the larger pieces home would be an interesting sight. Wooden furniture was gradually replaced by soft furnishings and upholstery (chairs and sofas), then textiles. There was a large area with mock designer clothes and fashions as well as gorgeous traditional party skirts, as well as housewears. There was a huge food area with fruit, dried goods, spaghetti, corn, meat, fish, live chickens, guinea pigs, rabbits (bought either to fatten and eat or to breed.)

There is a very popular second hand car market. Cars are parked along the side of the street and prices are haggled over until agreement is reached by a shake of hand. transactions are usually ash as few Bolivians have bank accounts or pay tax. There were also stalls selling spare parts for cars. Old rubber tyres are not wasted and are made into shoes, soles for mending shoes and cauldrons of all sizes. These had considerable style and would have graced any patio.

By now it was getting near lunchtime and the fast food stalls were doing a roaring trade. Stall holders were eating lunch by their stalls. This is the main meal of the day and is huge.

This was a well worthwhile morning and we thoroughly enjoyed it. Our only regret was that we hadn’t been able to take as many photographs as we would have liked. The Bolivian Indians do not like their photos being taken as they believe it takes away part of their soul. We felt we should respect their views.

USA
Level Contributor
1,420 posts
2 reviews
Save Reply
1. Re: El Alto - trip report part 4

Good review. About the oxygen... you don't even have to wait that long. There is oxygen available as soon as you get off the jetway. The original La Paz, which still stands today, was built up on the altiplano was soon abandoned by the Spaniards. They couldn't stand the armour..nor that incredibly cold wind.

USA
Level Contributor
1,420 posts
2 reviews
Save Reply
2. Re: El Alto - trip report part 4

Should have read, couldn't stand the altitude, especially wearing heavy armor.

Scunthorpe, United...
Level Contributor
3,583 posts
Save Reply
3. Re: El Alto - trip report part 4

Thank you for the complement. We were well acclimatised by the time we arrived at La Paz airport and didn't need oxygen. This was the first time I'd seen it supplied in a car, hence the comment.

Laja, the original settlement before La Paz is still a wind swept place. I'm not surprised the Spanish didn't like it! They couldn't cope with Potosi either and wealthy families moved to Sucre.

Vancouver
Level Contributor
124 posts
Save Reply
4. Re: El Alto - trip report part 4

I'm particularly interested in the indigenuous culture and was wondering if you heard anything of the possibility of staying in El Atlo for a night or and try to experience they're culture.

Same thing for Lake Titicaca; were interested in doing a home stay and get a unique experience.

Appreciate if you can share some insight on it...

5. Re: El Alto - trip report part 4

-:- Message from TripAdvisor staff -:-

This topic has been closed to new posts due to inactivity. We hope you'll join the conversation by posting to an open topic or starting a new one.

To review the TripAdvisor Forums Posting Guidelines, please follow this link: http://www.tripadvisor.com/pages/forums_posting_guidelines.html

We remove posts that do not follow our posting guidelines, and we reserve the right to remove any post for any reason.

Removed on: 2:26 am, March 06, 2011