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Dead Sea

canada
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Dead Sea

Looking for a good beach to enter Dead Sea between Masada and ein Gedi.

Have boys 7 and 10. No need for mud. Wiling to pay. Want easy access to water and decent facilities

Jerusalem, Israel
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1. Re: Dead Sea

The best choice is Ein Bokek beach. The beach itself is a public free beach with all the facilities. Parking costs money - use the parking meters. The beach is located 20 minutes drive south from Masada.

Map: http://goo.gl/maps/bTaQg

Israel
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2. Re: Dead Sea

There is no bathing beach between Ein Gedi and Masada. Ein Gedi is the closest to Masada (17 km north), and as Amos says, Ein Bokek is south of Masada.

Thousand Oaks...
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3. Re: Dead Sea

With two kids I would HIGHLY recommend that you take a stop at the Crowne Plaza in Ein Bokek.

You can get a day pass and enjoy the spa, freshwater pools, great Dead Sea access with showers, cafes, restaurants, lounge chairs, restrooms, etc.....

The kids will probably only spend 15 min or so in the Dead Sea (I wouldn't recommend any longer) but they will probably spend lots of time in their great pools.

Check out their pictures..... Do an image search on Google.

Dr. Z

Israel
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4. Re: Dead Sea

Just north of Ein Gedi is a Qaliya beach but of course not in the area you mentioned. There is a public beach at Ein Gedi but it is difficult to access due to the water receding. Ein Boqeq also had a publuc beach which is free or at one of the hotels including all the facilities. Note that you myat pay for parking at Ein Gedi and Ein Boqek beaches.

Chana

Israel

Israel
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5. Re: Dead Sea

Another option, again not between Masada and Ein Gedi as there are no beaches there - is Mineral Beach - clean, well maintained, decent locker rooms, showers, etc. and really all you need for a Dead Sea experience.

Haifa, Israel
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6. Re: Dead Sea

The Ein Gedi Spa is another nearby place (and the only one in the location you're seeking) which offers good access to the sea (via a kind of land-train which your kids might enjoy), decent facilities, and a nice freshwater pool. 79 NIS for adults, 51 for kids.

The Ein Gedi public beach is not bad and I think the facilities have just been renovated (showers, changing rooms, ice cream kiosk), though Ein Bokek is certainly more convenient.

NB Your kids might still be too young for the dead sea. The water has a weird oily texture, and can sting badly on cuts or sensitive areas of the body, and must not get into the eyes or be swallowed. Please, only take your kids into the water if you are 100% confident that they can control themselves not to panic in the water, not to try to swim as normal but rather just to float, not to accidentally rub their eyes, or splash. If you do take them there, I suggest you go in slowly, and carry a bottle of fresh water with you that you can immediately use to rinse them off if there are any problems.

Cincinnati, Ohio
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7. Re: Dead Sea

I would not take a seven-year-old in the Dead Sea. Even for an adult, it's a little unnerving when your legs and body kind of float up from under you, and kids can panic. When they panic, they flail, and flailing is DISASTROUS in the Dead Sea, splashing that caustic water into the eyes of the kids and those around them.

I'd pass on that, sadly. I hope you'll have another chance when they are older.

Douglas Duckett

Sydney, Australia
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8. Re: Dead Sea

On a slight tangent here, I'm a little perplexed as to how you exit the Dead Sea. That is, if you're floating, is it difficult to get yourself into an upright position so you can walk out? I've been fascinated by the Dead Sea since I was very young (a good many years ago), and am so looking forward to finally visit there this year. But I am a little concerned that I will experience some difficulties here. We will have a day trip as part of a tour, but will be spending 2 nights at the Dead Sea whilst in Jordan.

Any helpful hints would be most appreciated.

Cheers

DL

Israel
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9. Re: Dead Sea

You will figure it out yourself as instructions are useless. To float you need to squat down in water up to your knees and lay back. To stand upright you need to somehow get one foot to go back down to the floor of the lake and then the other whilst preventing splashing and getting water in your ears, nose, eyes and mouth. It's doable and not difficult. Enjoy the experience and don't forget to wear water shoes when going into the lake so you don't cut your foot on the salt rock.

Chana

Israel

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10. Re: Dead Sea

It's not easy to get in and out of the Dead Sea (which is one of the reasons why it's unsuitable for young children who don't have good physical control).

I don't remember the specifics of getting out, but since I obviously managed it (I'm not still there!), and so does everybody else...

Seriously, don't take anything into the water that you don't want to get wet. You will almost certainly lose your balance as you enter, and anything you are holding will go into the water even if it doesn't leave your hand. (I ruined a camera that way. If you want photos of yourself floating, get someone on dry land to take pictures.) Don't shave before going, and don't go in the water if you have any open cuts on your body, as this will be agony. Wear shoes - not flip-flops as they will float off - because the seabed is very rough and spiky. Sneakers or sandals with straps to secure them are OK.