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Roads in Turkey

Mandril
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18 posts
14 reviews
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Roads in Turkey

Hi all,

I'm planning a 2 weeks trip by car visiting istanbul-safranbolu-amasya-hattusas-capadocia-beysehir-kas-datca-izmir.

Using "Google Maps" the average speed is about 50-60km/h. Are so slow the roads in turkey?

Could anybody who have drive in Turkey help me?

Thank you very much!

The New Forest, UK
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1. Re: Roads in Turkey

I think 60-70km/h is more like the average. It depends on the road, some roads can be very slow.

The D400 is not a dual-carriageway and can be slow in places (3.5-4 hours from Antalya to Kas).

Mandril
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18 posts
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2. Re: Roads in Turkey

Thank you very much Davidm1.

Now I could plan better my trip.

Bye!

istanbul
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3. Re: Roads in Turkey

hi David,

Bubok, to add to david's post:

It depends on the car you are driving.

With a Fiat, Kia, hyundai or Renault Clio, i would go slow and calculate as David said.

With a better car, i would estimate an average of 80k/hr from Istanbul to Safranbolu, 60k/hr from Safranbolu to Cappadocia., 70k/hr from cappadocia to Konya. 60k/hr to datca, 70k/hr Marmaris to izmir.

These speeds will allow for short pit stops for fueling and tea.

Mandril
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18 posts
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4. Re: Roads in Turkey

Thanks for the post otherchelebi,

The last question is:

Where can find fuel prices in turkey updated?

Bye!

istanbul
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5. Re: Roads in Turkey

petrol prices change very slightly according to region, due to tranaportation costs and according to the dealer.

Currently cost for the most popular 95 Octane unleaded is about 3.60-3.85TL/Liter. Diesel is 15-18% cheaper i think.

the fuel prices will change according to the needs and whims of the government, since these prices are mostly various taxes and taxes on taxes. LOL.

Check the fuel consumption figures of the car models you are considering renting on web sites like, "What Car", and prefer diesel if you can find a reasonable priced one..

One other thing : DO NOT buy from gas stations which advertise cheap fuel. Prefer BP, Shell, Total, and Petrol Ofisi.

Edited: 7:25 am, July 15, 2010
Mandril
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18 posts
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6. Re: Roads in Turkey

Thank you one more time for your help otherchelebi.

And thanks for the advise about petrol stations, but only for information, what's the danger in "no official" petrol stations?

Bye.

The New Forest, UK
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7. Re: Roads in Turkey

You can get bad petrol sometimes (watered down?). After I'd filled up my rental motorbike at the Petrol Ofisi in Çığlık Köyü the bike was running really badly, until I stopped at a Shell station.

The New Forest, UK
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8. Re: Roads in Turkey

Here's the Shell Turkey website where you can find out the latest prices - www.shell.com/home/PlainPageServlet…

Mandril
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18 posts
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9. Re: Roads in Turkey

Ok, DAvidm1,

I'll take in my mind.

Thank you very much.

Cape Girardeau...
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10. Re: Roads in Turkey

Having just spent about 17 days on the road in Northeast Turkey, I can report that there is an EXTRAORDINARY amount of road construction in this area! We drove from the Cappadocia region to Erzurum, Trabzon, Fatsa, Amasya and Ankara with many diversions along the way.

Where completed, you get a very good four-lane highway and with the newly increased speed limit (110 km/hr on open highway), you can make quite good time.

Where incomplete, you get two-lane highways that vary from quite good to utterly miserable, rocky, hole-filled temporary paths.

If you plan on much mountain driving (rather hard to avoid in Turkey), I'd suggest a diesel. You get much better power and fuel economy. Diesel is currently about 3.05 lira per liter ($8 gallon); gasoline about 3.35 lira per liter.

Driving in Turkey can be hair-raising and confusing especially in large cities. Arriving at 5:30 p.m. to our hotel in the heart of Ankara during a thunderstorm while completely surrounded by yellow taxis was an experience I NEVER want to relive!!!! I HIGHLY recommend a GPS unit on a longer tour!!!! The normally friendlly and patient Turks seems to undergoe a Jekyl-Hyde transformation when they get behind a steering wheel. I don't like sweeping generalities, but be VERY wary when you see a Geman car approaching in your rear view mirror! Mercedes drivers in particular are insane, rude and truly think they own the roads.

Driving up mountains on a tiny dirt road is rather intimidating but extremely rewarding with unforgettable scenery.

You will be liable for any damage to your rental car--even damage that I consider an "act of God". We bottomed out a few times in construction zones (didn't sound too bad and no worse than I've encontered on bad roads in Missouri). About 100 km later, the "check engine" light came on. I got out, inspected underneath and saw that the plastic shield under the engine had come loose at the rear edge and was dragging the road. Surprisingly, I had not heard it as the asphalt tends to be quite noisy. The rental company said that I was liable, so I had it repaired (not replaced) with bailing wire and twice inspected to ensure no other damage. The check engine light cleared itself almost immediately and I had no other problems but will definitely dispute any charge for replacement made to my credit card. The car was quite new, but was already filled with scrapes and dings and I suspect that I was just the lucky one for the plastic piece to come completely loose.

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