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Maui Reaveled book?

riverside,ca
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Maui Reaveled book?

Where can you get this book everyone is talking about,Maui Reveled? I am leaving in one day!Can i pick it up before i leave?

Seattle, Washington
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11. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

If you go up to Amazon and read some of the reviews for Maui Revealed, you will see some of the issues that locals have with this book. I'm not sure if any of them were addressed in 3rd edition since I haven't gone through it in detail yet. But I think the book would still be a great resource if the authors did work closer with local to ensure that some of the sensitive issues were addressed in future editions.

belfast-UK
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12. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

"But I think the book would still be a great resource if the authors did work closer with local to ensure that some of the sensitive issues were addressed in future editions."

I would agree and if locals could explain the reasons on here - then maybe visitors like myself could vote with the hard earned cash. Ie bycotting certain things if thats the problem.

Just a thought.

jj.....

Kihei, Hawaii
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13. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

belfast-- Let's say your family has lived on land for generations. Your anscestors are buried here, and you depend on the land to feed your family. Now, on the other side of your land there is a waterfall. Or maybe even on your land. For generations you have permitted your neighbors to access the land and visit your waterfall--maybe a handful a month came through. Now, a guide book comes out and tells anyone who bought the book how to cross through your property to reach this waterfall. It includes advice such as "ignore the no trespassing signs," or "climb over the fence." As a result you now have hundreds of people a week coming across your land. Besides the traffic, they leave behind not just trash and excrement, but leave a nice layer of suntan oil on the water from swimming in it, injuring the ecosystem. The someone gets hurt and you are sued. Or, perhaps the people come to swim in water that is part of your water supply Oy!

Or, imagine there is land that has great cultural or religious significance to you and those who came before you. Ancient ancesters lived and died here, and are buried in here. Your forefather's gods walked here or even may still reside here. You have been raised to respect this area, and to obey the kapus of this place. This place is still pristine because of the great respect once paid to it, and has a very delicate eco-system. Now, the book tells visitors how to get here, how to cross through places of historical significance, never once mentioning that they are walking in a sacred place, or that there are sensitive archeological areas that should not be walked on. The number of people each day has a great impact on the fragile ecosystem. And people are unprepared for the harsh environment, showing up in bathing suits to hike through rough terrain, that is played down in the text.

Or, perhaps there is a place that is known to you and your family as a dangerous place, where the surf is unpredictable at times, or where flash floods can come through without warning. Again, the authors direct people there, and even tell them that this is place where they can relax next to the rough surf in relative safety. Then a tragedy happens. The landowner is sued, perhaps even the National Park System, for millions of dollars.

I have not yet seen the third edition of the book, but in the last two they failed to stress potential dangers, making some places sound more like a theme park. People have been injured or worse, lulled into a false sense of security by the text. Many times in the past couple of years, when we read about incidents, the story often carried a quote by the family saying that they thought it was safe based on what they had read in the book. A drowning that took place at the Olivine Pools last year is an example of this. The authors also gave directions to many places that included instructions to "climb the fence." And they paid very little attention to the fact that some places here are held sacred to kanaka. Would it hurt to say "This is a sacred place?" Would you encourage hikers to traipse willy-nilly across and picnic in places sacred to Western beliefs? They had been asked many times prior to the third edition to address these things. I can only hope they have.

Trabuco Canyon...
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14. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

kaiwahine- I am new to trip advisor forum and find your knowledge and advice helpful. Is there a way to contact you directly with questions? If not, I will ask a few now and hope for a response.

I will be staying in a small beachfront bungalow in Wailea between polo beach and palauea beach. I have read that Palauea beach is local hangout. Is is tourist friendly? Are there areas in Wailea/Makena area that may be suggested (I have the third edition) but shouldn't be tresspassed upon? Can I walk along the ocean front in font of my rental property to access Palauea or would I be tresspassing on the othe beachfront properties?

I read the amusing centepide story but plan on leaving my centipede knife and boric acid at home. If I am staying in a home on a large grass/plant/tree covered property, what should I be expecting. Geckos are cute but flying cockroaches might send me over the edge. Will I need to be sedated to go out of the house at night? I have been to Wailea 3 times in the past and never noticed any problem but I assume the resorts spray huge amounts of pesticides. (except for the giant cane spider that made that poor womans husband lock himself in the bathroom) My husband refuses to kill bugs. He captures them and sets them free..

Lots of questions-hope you see this!!!

belfast-UK
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15. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

Thanks kaiwahine for your detailed reply.

I can assure you that my wife and i will not ignore any no trespassing signs ( they are there for a reason ) Anywhere we travel in the World we give the utmost respect to cultural or religious sites - as should other Travellers - After all we are guests in other peoples countries.

kaiwahine have you contacted Wizard directly with your views/thoughts ?

I hope other Visitors read this thread.

jj.....

I KU MAU MAU
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16. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

".....People have been injured or worse, lulled into a false sense of security by the text. Many times in the past couple of years, when we read about incidents, the story often carried a quote by the family saying that they thought it was safe based on what they had read in the book. A drowning that took place at the Olivine Pools last year is an example of this....."

My boyfriend is a firefighter with the Maui County Fire Department. In nearly every single rescue call involving visitors to Maui, the 'blue bible' has played a role in the incident.

Kauai / Los Angeles
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17. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

I just wonder how much of a role stupidity or lack of common sense has played in some of these incidents?

I haven't read "Maui Revealed", but have read "Kauai Revealed" many times. Both the 4th and 5th editions seem quite well written, and always say when something is on private property. If the book doesn't say something is on private property, there's a good chance it's on public land. They also give good advice about watching wave and surf conditions before going in the water.

Many people don't realize that a lot of maps on file with the county contain incorrect information, private properties are not always properly fenced or posted, and sacred places have little to no protection or signage. It's hard to hold the authors responsible for that. And I would be very surprised to find a section in any of their books that instructs the reader to deliberately ignore no-trespassing signs and climb fences. Doughty and Friedman live on Kauai and people know where to find them!! I would also expect that not every person breaking these "rules" is a tourist. Locals also have their own way of doing things and going places, and will continue doing them because "that's how it's always been".

Unfortunately, what the authors can't do is supply each reader with the ability to realize when something is beyond their physical capabilities or when they need to pay attention to a sign. Until the time that they can, every visitor needs to use their own coconut and apply as much common sense as they do sunscreen.

Trabuco Canyon...
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18. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

bump

Morgantown, West...
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19. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

I am going to Maui and Kauai in August and I have no desire or intention to disrespect someone's property or heritage. But it is going to be difficult to distinguish private from public property where there may no signs or fences. That being said it would be great if the people who have a problem with the blue bible help us distinguish what is and isn't ok.

It would be ideal if someone went through the book and pointed out any problems. This would take some time but if it is as important as implied in earlier posts then it should be done.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

Kihei, Hawaii
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20. Re: Maui Reaveled book?

You should have no problems at all. Private property is almost always posted. In other places you may just encounter a fence. Some common sense will tell you not to park on people's lawns, or to climb over locked gates.