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Disabled guests and lines

california
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Disabled guests and lines

My husband is a double below the knee amputee and wears prosthetics. Standing in one place for a long time is very uncomfortable for him. However, he refuses to ride in a wheelchair as it's not particularly necessary.

So my question is, besides the use of a FastPass, does he qualify to get in a shorter line? I heard there may be shorter disabled lines where he wouldn't have to stand as long. An if so, could his whole group (family) join him?

I checked to Disneyland website but it doesn't talk about this, just wheelchairs and EVC's.

Thanks!

california
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1. Re: Disabled guests and lines

Oops, I meant ECV's

Las Vegas, Nevada
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for Anaheim, St. George
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2. Re: Disabled guests and lines

Things are done from what I understand on an individual basis, so you are better off contacting Disneyland directly to ask about your situation as far as whether or not you could qualify for a special pass of some kind which usually is for all guests in your party.

Or, if you cant get a special pass, another option may be for you to bring in one of those cain/chairs so they can sit if they need to while waiting in line.

california
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3. Re: Disabled guests and lines

Thank you! I will contact them. Happen to have a phone number? I didn't see a number on the disability page...

Also, if going the cane/chair route, what would you do with it while on rides?

Las Vegas, Nevada
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for Anaheim, St. George
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4. Re: Disabled guests and lines

The cane folds up, so it should be able to be taken on rides with you. As far as Im aware, thats the only kind of chair type of thing thats allowed inside Disneyland.

It looks like the only number to call them for what you would be needing is their general Phone number. Then when you get a Castmember to talk to tell them what you need, and they can send your call to the right extention.

Guest Information & Ticket Sales

(714) 781-INFO

(714) 781-4636

Hours to Call

•Monday through Friday: 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

•Saturdays and Sundays: 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.

•Holiday hours may vary between 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Edited: 5:12 pm, January 12, 2013
Anaheim, California
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5. Re: Disabled guests and lines

Yes, first off, Disney no longer gives Guest Assistance Passes to most folks.

If you need special assistance, such as avoid stairs, they will give you pass that does just that, avoiding stairs. But you still have to wait in most queues.

The answer to Disney is a Wheelchair for endurance issues, that is their policy. I understand folks that don't want to use one for "pride" reasons, but in this case, it really makes sense. They rent them at the park, $12 (plus a $20 deposit) for a manual, and $50 (plus $20 deposit) for a ECV (Electric).

This allows you to sit while in line.

Since Disney California Adventure opened in 2001, the whole park is ADA compliant, so you use the standard queues.

In Disneyland, there is some attractions that have a special wheelchair entrance (usually the ride exit).

On all the rides, you take your cane, with a few exceptions, in which the Cast Member (employee) will hold it during the ride (I know that Indiana Jones is one that holds cane/crutches).

IMHO, tell your Husband that nobody at the park knows him, or even cares if he is in a wheelchair, and just use one for the sake of the entire group!

california
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6. Re: Disabled guests and lines

Thank you Darkbeer, it is sort of a pride thing and also that he walks just fine, a wheelchair would just slow him down when moving throughout the park, especially since he just got the new Bluetooth technology legs, Élan. But it's more of a problem when just standing. I guess we will look into the cane deal...thanks so much!

Terrigal, Australia
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7. Re: Disabled guests and lines

We were there for 14 days in December and they were still happy to issue a GAP to our family of 6. It is identical to the previous (2) passes from years gone by and there was only a modest enquiry from the Cast Member as to why we needed it. She took one look at our son and understood, so I would be confident that your husband has an exceptional circumstance.

Perhaps, as Darkbeer suggests - they have suspended that process, but I can assure you it was in place a month ago. There is limited information on the pass from the websites and I believe that is because it would be way too hard and complex to categorise all enquiries, so they do ask that you present yourself in person to Guest Relations once inside and be assessed on a case by case basis.

Cheers.

Yucaipa, California
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8. Re: Disabled guests and lines

It could be possible that your main concern with standing could turn out to be waiting for and viewing nightime shows and parades. It is possible to sit on the ground prior to Fantasmic and the fireworks shows, but typically the space you have to do so is limited as more and more people fill up the viewing areas. So that results in less space to move around when getting up.

There is reserved riverside seating available for Fantasmic, at a cost of around $60 a person. With that you get a nice close up view of the show (better than the handicapped section, from what I have noticed) and are served coffee and snacks. If $60 a person is too much for your entire family, then perhaps one person could sit with your husband. I have heard, that it is still necessary to wait in line to check in for the reserved seating. The show lasts about 20 minutes and everyone who does not have reserved seating is asked to stand during the show. There are also many chair placed outside the Riverbelle Terrace all the way down almost to the Golden Horseshow Saloon provided at no charge, but those go to whoever can get to them first. The view is not considered very good, especially further down toward Golden Horseshoe. It is a little above the riverside viewing area, so during the show you will also be viewing the crowd of guests along the river who are viewing the show. If you there are two showings a night when you go, the later show is generally less crowded, however it is much easier to get into the area for the first show. It could be a good idea to have dinner at the Riverbelle Terrace at an outside table and stay there.

The fireworks can be seen at the Rivers of America, however not the entire show, just the aerial fireworks. But if you want the reserve seating for an early showing of Fantasmic, then you will get a very nice view of those. Seating around the Riverbelle Terrace is also nice. When I viewed the fireworks in December I happened to stand next to a bench near the Partners Statue (Walt and Mickey) while waiting and the people who were sitting there left, so myself and a couple of other people got to sit down on the bench. It was great. There was a tree nearby, which partically blocked the view, but being winter it was somewhat bare and I actually saw some fireworks through it. I would recommend heading over to that area a couple of hours prior to the fireworks show and seeing if you can stake out a bench. Fireworks shows may last up to 20 min, but some are a little less than 15 minutes. It depends on which one is offered when you are there.

I am not sure what to recommend for World of Color, as I have not seen it and have heard that only those in wheelchairs are able to sit during the show.

There is other park entertainment that you as a group may want to stand and watch as you come upon it, such as the Disneyland Marching Band, the jazz bands in New Orleans Square (although one plays at a restaurants and you can find out the times), the Dapper Dans barbershop quartette. Its good to consider what your entire visit is going to be like and not just the rides. When you consider everything you'll see that it is going to be more than rides and their necessary lines.

One thing thing that I think is important to keep in mind is that you might find that other guests are likely to be concerned about getting to where they are going or wrapped up in their own experiences. Sure, there are people who are conscience of others, but even the nicest people can do things like cut in front of someone who is walking when they are rushing to get somewhere in the park. I'm sorry to say that I did this recently at another park. I did judge the person to be able to handle it if I ran in front up him quickly and I judged I had enough room to get by, but how do you really know what someone is going physically or if they are even paying enough attention? (And, yes, I did feel bad later thinking about what if the guy turned suddenly and we both tripped.) For this reason, defense against other guests who might not be thinking, it could be a good idea to get a wheelchair (I'd go with an EVC). I don't think it broadcasts there is another different about someone and it is very helpful in an amusement park. I can understand his desire to walk about, though.

Edited: 4:17 pm, January 14, 2013
Las Vegas, Nevada
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9. Re: Disabled guests and lines

The World of Color show does have some limited seating for people who need to sit, but are not in a Wheelchair, however, Ive heard since the are area is so limited, only the person who needs to sit can have a spot, and the rest of that group would have to stand around them for the show. You can just ask a Castmember about where they can sit when you arrive at the viewing area for the show.

Los Angeles, CA
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10. Re: Disabled guests and lines

At both Disneyland and California Adventures theme park, you can go to Guest Relations (it's located at the "City Hall" at Disneyland, and to the left after you enter DCA). They can assist you with special line passes for your family for the duration of your trip.