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Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Bracebridge, Canada
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Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Morgana we have just returned to Canada and want to thank you again for the itinery to the dales. We followed it to a T and had the MOST wonderful adventure. We started in Ripon, past Leyburn, stopped at Jervaulx Abbey (wow!) Aysgarth Falls (and wandered in the cemetary filled with daffodils) lunch in Buckden, Pately Bridge (had to stop here!). We were blown away by the beauty of this trip. Beyond the spectacular views for miles, was the presence of the rock walls. We were in awe!! You gave us to trip to show the highlights of 3 dales and my goodness did it ever! On another day we also saw the rugged moors and stopped at Blakey Ridge (sunny day). Oh my, I still see sheep wandering the roads, views for miles on end, pheasants, it goes on and on. Staithe and Whitby were so beautiful, Sutton Bank, Helmsely, Kilburn (climb up the ridge beside the horse). I could go on and on. Anyone in England that has not visited this part of the country must visit. Once again thank you for your wonderful suggestions- you made our trip! Laing

Yorkshire Dales...
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1. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Awww - you have made MY day by your kind comments.

So glad you were able to see so much of this beautiful part of the country. Although the weather has been pretty cold recently it has been very clear and crisp, which is great for admiring the stunning views. Plus the lambs and spring flowers set the views off! The drystone walls are very much a feature, and along with the meadows and stone barns give the area such a unique look.

I've travelled all over the UK and beyond, but to me the Dales remains the most beautiful area I know.

I was interested in your comments on Oswalds, and the Magpie Cafe of course! Love the fish there!

Jervaulx rarely gets a mention, but I love its peacefulness. I had a feeling you would appreciate it!

Was the Buck Inn in Buckden open again or did you try somewhere else?

Come back soon!

M

Bracebridge, Canada
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2. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Hi Morgana!

Something was different about the Buckden Inn as the 2 fellows didn't know prices etc and had to look around for various things we inquired about. When I asked about the dry stone walls they had no idea what I was talking about! We did meet 2 wonderful gentlemen in the pub that were walkers and they filled us in on everything and more we wanted to konw about the area. I'd love to research those walls as I/we cannot get over the hundreds of miles of stone and the millions of stones that have beeen trudged up up up to make the walls. Honestly, the beauty is still very much in my mind. The simplicity, the honesty, the people, ...how lucky you are to live so close!

Salem, Oregon
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3. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Laing1, I too am a huge fan of the stone walls throughout Britain. They're like slate ribbons running in all directions.

At a National Trust barn in the Peak District at Viattor's Bridge (Izaak Walton) there is a display that says that the walls were built at the rate of five yards per day, one ton per yard. Imagine! A guided walk out of Ambleside in the Lake District included a very interesting segment showing the construction of a stone walls.

Alfred Wainwright, Britain’s most famous and respected fell walker, described the stone walls of the Lake District this way:

“The walls are still in pristine condition despite nearly two centuries of storms and strong winds. Everywhere, even on the steepest ground, the stones are laid in persevering horizontal courses and with such skill in construction that they are securely wedged without the use of mortar.

"The men who built the stone walls that run for miles over the high fells of Lakeland were experts at their craft; they had to collect the stones from the ground nearby and cut them to shape on the site. They often spent the nights on the fells to save travelling and their reward was eight pence a day.

"These men are forgotten. The walls they built so well are monuments to these unknown craftsmen. Other men have been knighted for less.”

Yorkshire Dales...
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for North Yorkshire, Suffolk
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4. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Fortunately there are still plenty of drystonewallers around today, and it is fascinating to see them work. The have a pile of stones behind them, they look at the gap they want to fill and instinctively reach for the right size and shape. Not only are the walls beautiful but they are home to many different types of wildlife as well, as inside the stones it usually remains dry and warm.

You may be interested in this -

dswa.org.uk/Publications/…202004.pdf

I recall visiting the Dales when my children were younger (think it was Grassington) and there was a demonstation of walling, letting adults and children have a go. Believe you me, it's not easy!

I also see drystonewalling courses advertised, sometimes as a weekend holiday activity - something for you to do on your next trip over here???

M

Salem, Oregon
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5. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Morgana, I know a woman who did just that on a working holiday with the National Trust. She spent a week working on a crew doing drystone wall repair. She said it was her best holiday ever.

Bracebridge, Canada
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6. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

You know it's still hard to undersatand. I could barely walk (not that I tried) up those steep hills let alone drag a massive amount of rocks up with me. Did they use oxen or something and some kind of a wagon to get them up there? Honestly if someone has not seen these hills they have no concept of

these "historical" landmarks and the work that went into their creation.

oldham
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7. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

hi

I think you are the couple that my husband and i were talking to at your stay at Oswalds. I'm very pleased you enjoyed the rest of your stay in England.

York
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8. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

laing1, you may have moticed the walls can change colour, if only silghtly, within a few feet and this is because the stone, where possible, was picked up in the fields around where the walls were built, or from small quarries adjacent. I am sure some pack horses must have been used in places, but notice as soon as you are out of the stone areas, eg into lower Wensleydale, around Jervaulx and beyond towards Ripon and York, there are more hedges than walls, no stone outcrops in the fields you see!

Bracebridge, Canada
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9. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

Flowerchick... yes we did meet at Oswald's! Good memory! I wouldn't hesitate to stay there again sometime. What wonderful food and to have fresh cookies in your room and wonderful amenities like.. was it, Molton Brown? Great secret spot tucked away in Sowerby!!

10. Re: Morgana- re trip to moors/dales

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