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Crash course on British slang

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Crash course on British slang

My daughter wants to know what some of the common slang words are in London. Words she can use to impress the locals of her mastery of the local language.

London, UK
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1. Re: Crash course on British slang

Don't put your daughter on the stage, Mrs Worthington...

Any slang (rhyming/rhythmic/undulating/Mockney/filthy) that this forum will offer will make her look either dead common or terminably uncool (e.g. lukewarm) to her peers & locals.

Any patois she really needs can be gained by hanging out with her peer group.

Peak District...
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2. Re: Crash course on British slang

I agree that people are usually more helpful when asked for help than for it to be implied that one already knows.

London, United...
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3. Re: Crash course on British slang

ok I have a 16 year old daughter and words she commonly uses apart from NO are

thats right proper 'out' meaning out of order

bare...meaning very really or loads

buff...meaning fit ie he is right buff

butterz...meaning minging ie she is right minging as it unfashionable, ugly dirty etc

bread bins....mares/friends

bang...meaning hit or punch

beef....meaning do you have a problem with me

innit...the most uncoolest word ever but they all seem to use!!

believe it or not my daughter attends a good all girls school, we live in an affluent suburb of surrey and I have dragged her up to talk nicely yet put her with a group of her 'friends' and this is what comes out of their mouths.

one hopes she will grow up soon!

my husband is a policeman and they have their own weird language that is just too weird to go into!

London, United...
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4. Re: Crash course on British slang

ps just buy your daughter the coolest most expensive newest pair of trainers/sneakers possible that havent yet arrived in the uk and she will be doing ok over here....shallow bunch they are this side of the pond!

Vancouver, Canada
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5. Re: Crash course on British slang

Must agree with other postings (when did you get all posh and Buckhurst Hill-ish, EmParr? Fink you're better than me, an' all?). Please try not to buy one of the terminally 'cute' (yeesh) small books of London slang or Cockney rhyming slang or some such, as they are an embarassment to us all.

Minging, by the way, means gone off or rotten, dirty or seriously unpleasant. A useful word, I think.

At the risk of visitors getting the hump (lmbarch, it means getting cross with someone), Londoners will know you're not local when they hear you speak. Whether it's accent or syntax, there's always a giveaway. The good bit is that there's always an appeal in the unknown - from both sides.

I suspect Kitten is right about the trainers, too - how to start a trend in one easy lesson.

Pacific Grove...
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6. Re: Crash course on British slang

Well....here's a simple one that seems to be in every other sentence written or spoken in the UK and still shows no sign of wearing out: "brilliant!" -- as in fabulous, groovy, awesome, fantastic and apparently a lot more all rolled into one.

Couple of other ones that come to mind:

loo or toilet = bathroom, restroom

ring me up = call me on the phone

London, United...
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7. Re: Crash course on British slang

pr of course...I'll give ya a bell innit...done whilst walking backwards up a crowded street whilst making a telephone sign with your fingers to you ear!

dead classy us londoners dont you know!

Colchester UK
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8. Re: Crash course on British slang

"Yea but, no but" springs to mind, as does "Yea I know" or, only to be used in Llnanddewi Brefi, Wales "It's so hard being the only gay in the village". Basically anything from "Little Britain" should guarantee you some modicum of "street cred".

London, England
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9. Re: Crash course on British slang

Slang varies all over the place - I often come across words I've never heard of on a daily basis just by travelling to a different part of London or England. Some common ones however are: being 'pissed' is equivalent to being 'drunk', if someone is 'fit' they are good-looking (and in a general way, not just in an athletic sense), if someone says the word 'well' followed by an adjective eg. "this is well good", it means 'very', as in "this is very good". A more vociferous way of saying 'well' would be 'blimmin', as in "this is blimmin' good!"

There are a lot of words that may confuse her, but the best thing is that she asks what they mean rather than trying to guess. Londoners are more than happy to explain their weird and wonderful language, plus, typical Brit terms may sound peculiar in a different accent - and at any rate, we love hearing the slang that YOU guys have!

dallas, tx.
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10. Re: Crash course on British slang

One word that I have always wondered about is "bloody". Although I haven't heard anyone use it in quite some time. What is the origin of this word? Is it considered a bad word or just a way to describe something as horrible? Forgive my ignorance but i've always been curious.