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Northern Lights

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Albany, New York
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Northern Lights

I want to see the lights without freezing my tail off. It is my understanding that Aug./Sept can be good times for viewing (I know nothing is guaranteed). Any ideas about which which month would be better?

Also any suggestions about guide or no guide...and if yes to guide, any recommendations?

Thanks in advance.

Burt

Vancouver, Canada
Destination Expert
for Vancouver
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1. Re: Northern Lights

Someone posted their reflections about their research and experience seeing the Northern Lights which can be found in the Top Questions to the right of the page for the Yukon Forum. They might be of some help to you. Here is the short cut to that information:

tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g155045-i1403-k615…

Edmonton, Canada
Destination Expert
for Edmonton, Yellowknife
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1,337 posts
35 reviews
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2. Re: Northern Lights

The colder the better, which in this case would be September. It still will be nice out with fall colours, the nights will be cooler and crisp. Best to see it where there is small to no light pollution. I've never been to Whitehorse or the Yukon, I do know that are somewhat protected by mountains, Yellowknife is not. I don't know how much of an impact that will have on the lights, but in YK, September is still a great time to see them and it's not too cold.

Toronto, Canada
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15,154 posts
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3. Re: Northern Lights

Got to tough it out, being a bit cold will be worth the northern lights...

Albany, New York
4 posts
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4. Re: Northern Lights

Thanks for the helpful reply. I have looked at Whitehorse. et al and have decided that YK is the best spot for me. I know that winter is the best time, but my interest is in photography, and the idea of trying to manipulate camera controsl while I am freezing my tail off and have numb fingers is just not appealing. Iceland was a great disappopintment. Went in Nov. Lots of rain, sleet, etc.

So, Sept. it will be for us.

So, thanks again. Any suggestions re: guide or no guide and if guide, any recommendations?

Albany, New York
4 posts
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5. Re: Northern Lights

This old dude (76) can't ahandle the cold like he used to, and trying to work my camera with numb fingers and/or gloves is not appealing.

Toronto, Canada
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15,154 posts
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6. Re: Northern Lights

Lol, hopefully it won't be too bad! Best of luck with the weather!!

Edmonton, Canada
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for Edmonton, Yellowknife
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7. Re: Northern Lights

Honestly, you won't need a guide, you can see the lights pretty much anywhere. I used to see them all the time walking home at night. Are you planning on renting a car?

If so, head out on the Ingraham Trail to any place along the way, Prelude, Tibbitt, Reid Lake, etc. You can even head out by the airport to the sand pits for an open space. Tin can hill is another good spot. You can also try across the street from the airport at Long Lake. There is a beach there where you can setup your equipment.

If you feel that you need a guide, try the Aurora Village, I've heard great things about them:

http://www.auroravillage.com/index.html

tripadvisor.ca/Attraction_Review-g154966-d58…

Montreal, Canada
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707 posts
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8. Re: Northern Lights

Consider that the arrival of the autumnal equinox signals a transition from northern summer to fall in an astronomical sense. But it also signals the start of aurora-watching season.

In fact, auroras peak in frequency twice a year, with the other peak coming in the weeks before and after the Vernal Equinox, which marks the beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere. But why are aurora displays more common around the time of the equinoxes?

According to Janet Green, a physicist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the times around the equinoxes are when geomagnetic storms — disturbances in the Earth's magnetic field — are strongest. [Earth's Equinoxes & Solstices (Infographic)]

In fact, geomagnetic disturbances are almost twice as likely in spring and fall compared with winter and summer, according to 75 years of historical records analyzed by solar physicist David Hathaway of NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama. Such disturbances are usually the cause for aurora displays.

(Source: space.com/17692-fall-equinox-northern-lights… ).

9. Re: Northern Lights

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