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Weather in May/June?

Dallas, Texas
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11 posts
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Weather in May/June?

Hi there,

My family and I are planning a trip to Field (Emerald Lake Lodge) and Banff (Rimorkc Resort) at the end of May through the first week in June.

We are from Texas, so we are not used to cold weather.

Does anyone know what the temperature will be like in Field and Banff at that time?

I don't know what to pack. (although I do know it won't be shorts and swimsuits) :)

Oh, and any advice you can give on some "must-sees" while we are there would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you

Calgary, Alberta...
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1. Re: Weather in May/June?

Hello missphnx,

I used the Trip Planner feature of the Weather Underground website to look up Banff's temperatures from May 27 through June 11 over the last five years. Field's temperatures will be close enough to Banff's to be valid for planning purposes. Temperatures were as follows:

Average daily high : 59 deg F

Highest high : 75 deg F

Average night time low : 38 deg F

Lowest low : 28 deg F

As you can see from the wide range of temperatures that you potentially could encounter, you should bring layers of clothing so that you can respond to changing weather conditions. Bring hiking boots or at the very least running shoes and sturdy socks, as hiking trails are still likely to have some snow on them.

You should wear practical, casual clothing during the day (think LL Bean and Lands' End catalogs). All mountain restaurants, even the most upscale ones, are casual at lunch time. But that I mean that people have lunch in their hiking boots. Modertaly priced mountain restaurants are casual at dinner time too. However, upscale restaurants like the ones in the hotels in which you'll be staying require smart casual attire in the evenings.

My husband and I are about to watch a movie. I'll return later and see what other information you may have been given in the interim. :-)

Calgary, Alberta...
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2. Re: Weather in May/June?

>>>>>>Oh, and any advice you can give on some "must-sees" while we are there would be greatly appreciated.<<<<<<

Well Emerald Lake itself is an attraction.

Certainly you should see Lake Louise and, if the road to it is open, nearby Moraine Lake. Both of those lakes are at the west end of Banff National Park, close to Yoho National Park where you'll be staying.

From your base at Emerald Lake, you could go to Lake Louise and then drive up the Icefields Parkway as if you were going to Jasper. Check out Peyto Lake, consider taking the ride in the Snocoach onto the Athabasca Glacier at the Columbia Icefields, and then continue to Sunwapta Falls. Depending on how well you're doing for time, that is the point at which you may need to turn around and drive back to Field.

If you have another day to spare, you could drive west to Golden and then south to Radium Hot Springs. At Radium turn northeast and drive through Kootenay National Park. When you reach Castle Junction, turn west onto the TransCanada Highway, and drive past Banff and Field, back to Emerald Lake Lodge.

Although I have not been to it myself, the Eagle Eye restaurant at the top of the Kicking Horse ski resort near Golden is reputed to be excellent, if expensive. Another Golden attraction that has been mentioned on this forum, but that I have not visited myself, is a wolf sanctuary.

Emerald Lake has outdoor hot tubs. In addition to that Radium, Banff townsite and several other places in the mountains has hot springs. So a swimsuit may not be as far out of line as you may imagine.

You'll need to pick and choose your hikes. That early in the season some trails may still have snow on them or at least be very wet. Generally speaking it will be the trails that are at lower elevations (relatively speaking) that will be free of snow. If you're in doubt, ask the folks at the tourist information offices in Field and Lake Louise which hikes they recommend.

If you want to do something quite adventurous you could go white water rafting on the Kicking Horse River near Golden. If you have a young family, they may not be accepted on the rafting trips that include Class IV rapids. Pasengers have to meet minimum threshholds of height or age. But some companies offer tamer, family-friendly rafting trips.

In the Banff area, a visit to Johnston Canyon, a ride in the Sulphur Mountain Gondola and a stroll through Banff townsite are amongst the most popular things for visitors to do.

Hope that helps.

Dallas, Texas
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3. Re: Weather in May/June?

Wow Judy, thank you SOO much for the wealth of information. I am printing out your posts and taking them with me.

I would be very interested in the wolf santuary. Where would I find more information about that?

Thank you again so much, you really went above and beyond to answer my question and I TRULY appreciate it.

THANK YOU THANK YOU!!

:)

Steph

Calgary, Alberta...
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4. Re: Weather in May/June?

You're most welcome, Steph.

The wolf sanctuary is called Northern Lights Wildlife Wolf Centre. Here is its website:

http://www.northernlightswildlife.com/

I want to correct an error in some earlier information I gave you. It was my description of the round trip from Field through Golden, Radium, Kootenay National Park and back to Field again. I said that, after driving through Kootenay National Park, you would come to Castle Junction. There you would need to turn west and drive past BANFF to Field. What I meant to say was that, after turning west at Castle Junction, you would drive past LAKE LOUISE to Field.

Calgary, Canada
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5. Re: Weather in May/June?

As Judy mentioned, the weather can be quite variable-- even within the same day (or hour)--and layers of clothes are the best way of staying comfortable. For a day in the mountains (often hiking), I usually bring/wear a polyester t-shirt, lightweight fleece top (a light sweater would work too), a water- and wind-proof jacket (i.e. gore-tex), wool socks, hiking boots, sunscreen, sunglasses, hat, camera, water, and of course lunch to enjoy from a scenic location. (Hiking boots probably aren't necessary if you're not doing any serious hiking, but at least bring comfortable shoes you don't mind getting wet/muddy.) Unless it's really cold, I usually wear shorts, but that's more because of personal preference--long pants would probably be better for most people. Pants with zip-off legs (converting them to shorts) can be handy.