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Seaweed

Luxembourg City...
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Seaweed

Hi everyone,

We are repeat guests at Kuredu and are staying 2 weeks at a JBV. We were a bit put off by all the seaweed around the island this time. Our last visit was in late 2013 and we stayed in the same area but don't remember all the seaweed... I was wondering if anyone else feels the same way? There was a few meters of clear water, after that there is a lot of seaweed. Does anyone know if this depends on the season or if they are trying to improve it? We would like to return but are now a bit afraid the situation will be worse next time...

Thanks,

Sara

England, United...
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for Maldives
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1. Re: Seaweed

Hi welcome to the forum 😎

It's probably sea grass and the turtles love it. I remember seeing large mats under the WVs that I think was probably put there to encourage the grass to grow. I have recently see the negative comments about the grass on facebook.

Edited: 3:30 am, April 27, 2017
Luxembourg City...
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2. Re: Seaweed

Hi, thanks a lot for your reply.

It's probably that then, sea grass... Turtles may love it, I guess we would prefer without it :)

Bishops Stortford...
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3. Re: Seaweed

There was substantial floating seaweed at Six Senses Laamu last week, we have never seen as much and assumed it was Atoll specific but maybe not.

Fornebu, Norway
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for Maldives
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4. Re: Seaweed

There is often an increase in macro algea after El Nino. Corals die off, and there is more space for macro algea to grow. This is not necessarily the case for seagrass, which easily grow in fine sand and does not need to be anchored in live rock/ limestone and rubble.

The Seychelles is a good example for that. In some areas where the corals have not managed to reestablish to a large extent after 1998, there has been more seaweed since. If it happens to a great extent, it also competes with coral. And in the very long run, the live rock will start to errode, and making it even more difficult for corals to return.

Lets hope that will not be the case in the Maldives, and that the reefs will heal well before that happens.

Bishops Stortford...
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5. Re: Seaweed

Thanks Vegard :)

Luxembourg City...
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6. Re: Seaweed

Thanks everyone for your replies! It is not floating seaweed as it is rooted in the sand... so I guess it's sea grass as you mentioned. Sorry for the confusion, it's the language barrier :)

It does make the water a little less blue, at least compared to our last visit. When the tide is low, there are just a couple meters without it.

On the up side, we just went for snorkeling close to the house reef and saw several turtles, one of them really big! So the seagrass does work well as feeding place 😉 we are always surprised by how much marine life we can spot!

7. Re: Seaweed

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