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Cuillin Mountain Scenery

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Newfoundland and...
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Cuillin Mountain Scenery

Could anyone tell me exactly where the scenery on this hike was encountered and about how long it would take to drive to the trailhead from Glencoe? See www.1adventure.com/archives/000120.html - it looks very nice - would be great to walk amidst it all...

Edinburgh, United...
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1. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

The Cuillins are in Skye.

http://www.skye.co.uk/

Edinburgh, Scotland
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2. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

That's the outfall of Loch Coruisk, at the heart of the Black Cuillin on Skye, probably the most spectacular mountains in Britain.

Access to that spot is possible on foot from Elgol, from the end of the track to Camasunary, and I would expect by cutting over the ridge from the path between Sligachan to Camasunary. There are also small boat trips in summer from Elgol.

Although it's not a huge distance (something like five miles each way for all of the above) and relatively flat, this is serious hill-walking requiring good boots, waterproofs in case the weather turns bad, plus a map, compass and the knowledge of how to use them. The "paths" are little more than routes through the bog with some signs of customary usage by crofters and animals. There is a bit of scrambling needed on the coastal route. See walkhighlands.co.uk/skye/lochcoruisk.shtml

Even if you take the boat, if you want to walk up to that exact spot from the landing, the ground can be variously boggy, slippery or uneven, so decent boots with ankle support are strongly advised.

Stanley, Falkland...
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3. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

According to Google Maps, it's 116 miles, and takes about 3 hours to drive between Glen Coe and Elgol. You then have a long walk or boat trip, weather permitting.

Have you looked at Glen Nevis - good scenery and not far from Glen Coe.?

Scotland
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4. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

That's one of my favourite places on the planet. The walk in is tricky sometimes. If it's wet you really need your wits about you and there's a bit of scrambling.

Easiest is to get the Bella Jane or the Misty Isle boats across from Elgol.

As Peterscot says allow 3 hours for the drive plus an hour each way on the boat plus however long you want to soak up the scenery.

Edited: 7:38 am, May 27, 2013
Newfoundland and...
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5. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

I've been through the travel books but the help here is unbeatable. As for the Cuillins, scrambling is no problem - as long as the scree is not too out of control. We've been wearing hikers but they're not ankle boots - we may be due for a refit.

Goodwich has great taste in scenery (see post above)!!

Have not looked at Glen Nevis - was concentrating on getting to Skye - the problem is accommodations found (finally) notified me that they will not take my children though the children are by no means teetering and out-of-country toddlers.

So it's off to the drawing board again - can 1) take two nights at an inn on Skye in order to get to the Cuillins following guidelines provided, 2) check out Glen Nevis instead, 3) spend an extra night or two in Edinburgh and then head to Hexam and somewhere like Langley Castle to make Hadrian's Wall more than a visit of a couple of hours, or 4) head up to Inverness from Glencoe (before going to Edinburgh) where I have found a quaint cottage for four nights. I'd take a train from Inverness to Edinburgh at this point but it sounds like we would miss Loch Lomonde, the Falkirk Wheel and Stirling.

Any comments on the options here? Whatever we do, it's Glasgow to Glencoe in a car (we hope) from England. If possible, I would like to work in a steam train trip, maybe the Jacobite towards Skye, or Fort William/Inver. to Edinburgh?

As background, I love the mountains - every summer is spent doing some hiking in the Rockies here. Have wanted to come to Scotland forever...but cannot plan travel far enough ahead to win the accommodations "race."

We are starting in London, travelling to Wiltshire and then coming into Glasgow where we will rent a car, and using the directions in TA, drive up the A82 "as in Skyfall" to our accommodations in Glencoe, where we stay for 3 or 4 nights.

We then have another 3 or 4 nights before heading to Edinburgh (only two if we chose Skye due to limited family lodging options). At this point, it's 3-4 nights Glencoe first, then "somewhere" with lodging, and then Edinburgh before heading to the northern Lake District for a couple of nights and going back to London. Another possibility is simply visiting only Glencoe and Edinburgh and spending four nights in each before moving on.

Any comments about these options?

Edinburgh...
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6. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

One reason for boots rather than trainers is because of squelchiness underfoot, as well as the lessened risk of turning your ankle. Yes you can walk in, but beware one small section called the 'bad step' where the track crosses a large slab of sloping rock. That said, the walk-in is attractive, but walking in and out will take up a good portion of your day.

I'm a mountaineer, but to my mind, the boat makes a good way in. You get fantastic panoramas from Elgol, you often see sea life and bird life from the boat, it can leave you at the lochside to return on a later boat, giving you time to make a circuit round loch Coruisk, or scramble on some of the lower slopes. There are some paths and tracks in the area but it's pretty wild. The mountain tops require great confidence and some of them require climbing kit.

england
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7. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

OP has small children,

I would be wary of taking them on the Cuillin.

Edinburgh...
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8. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

"As background, I love the mountains - every summer is spent doing some hiking in the Rockies here."

I assume the OP therefore knows enough to make her own decision when she gets there, and will recognise how different the Scottish mountains are to the trails in the rockies.

But you're right, with a young child in tow you have to be it bit more careful - though I've seen plenty mountaineering mums and dads with these packpack type child carriers ...

Scotland
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9. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

TBH the path along the cliff from Elgol to Loch Coruisk and the area the OP is interested in, isn't one I'd do with small children or a child in a back-carrier. The drops are steep at quite a few points and both hands are needed to hold on.

There is another way from Kilmarie on the road between Torrin and Elgol which is an easier walk over the hill. Theres a car park at the roadside.

I'd take Derek's good advice though and use the boat. Much more fun

Edinburgh, Scotland
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10. Re: Cuillin Mountain Scenery

Good point. I had somehow gained the impression that OP's children were teenagers. I have been in the position of walking that path with young children. We went most of the way to Camasunary and then walked back. There is absolutely no way I would have taken them along the later sections.

OP's family will surely enjoy the boat trip, however.

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