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What does this mean?

Houston, Texas
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What does this mean?

Example:

You see two flights at the same time departing and arriving at an airport, but two different airlines.

(DL) Delta Air Lines 9663

(AMS) Amsterdam, NL to (IST) Istanbul, TR

Operated by (KL) KLM 1617

flightstats.com/go/…

So is it KLM or Delta that is flying?

Portland, Oregon
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1. Re: What does this mean?

It's a KLM operated flight with a Delta code share. KLM is flying it.

Houston, Texas
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2. Re: What does this mean?

So does that mean that both Delta and KLM offered the same flight or that you could have booked the same flight with either of them?

South Pole
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3. Re: What does this mean?

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Codeshare_agreement

Houston, Texas
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4. Re: What does this mean?

Thanks!! Now it all makes sense.

Berkeley, CA
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5. Re: What does this mean?

However, the code share flights are not always at the same price, so it pays to check each of the airlines.

Bingley, United...
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for Edinburgh
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6. Re: What does this mean?

Check things like luggage allowance as well - there's no guarantee that you'll get the same on both airlines

Houston, Texas
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7. Re: What does this mean?

I brought it up because I booked with Turkish Airlines. Using there plane, flight number, etc, but also saw that US Airways was part of the flight as well. I already know what Turkish Airlines stuff is.

Mount Dora, Florida
Destination Expert
for Istanbul
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8. Re: What does this mean?

I try to avoid flying code-share metal when possible. When I fly with my original airline, like Delta, I can select my seat at the time I make my reservation. When I fly a leg of my journey with KLM I cannot select my own seat until 24 hours before the flight, when there is nothing left but center seats at the back of the plane. There is never a chance that I will get two seats together. I understand that all these airline alliances result in code-share flights for many international trips, but I really dislike having to use a different carrier.

Also, if you have benefits as a result of status with your airline, they will not necessarily be recognized by the partner airline. Alaska Airline still charges me for checked luggage, even though my status permits me free checked luggage with Delta. Regardless of how high my status with Delta is, Alaska will upgrade every single one of their passengers with any degree of status, before they upgrade any Delta passengers.

Portland, Oregon
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9. Re: What does this mean?

Agreed Busy Retired (mostly).

Here's a two year old article by Cranky Flier that (mostly) sums up my thoughts. (Note the checked baggage comment is a little outdated as it preceded the most significant carrier rule).

crankyflier.com/2011/…

I know why the airlines code share all these flights; trying to fit their revenue accounting into ancient reservation systems/infrastructure. But it's hugely frustrating searching on Matrix, or Skyscanner and seeing 15 combinations of round trip itineraries that are all actually the same flights!!

sydney
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for Cambodia
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10. Re: What does this mean?

re pricing differences on code share flights - we flew Sydney > Frankfurt via Singapore last December - Qantas & Lufthansa (before that divorce) and paid almost $500 less per person booking with Lufthansa. Flights between Sydney & Singapore (both ways were Qantas planes & crew) and Singapore to Frankfurt & return were Lufthansa - booked on one ticket. It certainly paid us to check both airlines for prices.