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Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

Kuala Lumpur...
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Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

I love the city of Boston - it has an enduring magic to it for me, and it was the last American city i visited (my second time) before i left the US for good and went back home to Malaysia. I, with so many others, watched in horror as the aftermath of the explosions recently unfolded. I couldn't believe that was happening in Boston.

That being said, we are due to travel to Chicago via JFK, then onward to DC from there, in early May. I wear a headscarf, my husband is brown-skinned, and we are travelling from Turkey, with Malaysian passports. I know airport security will be a nightmare for us, and i'm also worried about any reactions we might receive while we're there.

This might be a silly thing to worry about, as in my entire time living in the States I never faced more than a handful of these instances myself. But i also wasn't wearing a headscarf right after an attack - even if we don't know who was behind it yet, y'know?

Any thoughts?

Jacksonville...
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1. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

I wouldn't spend too much time worrying about it. Come to the US and have a good time. I'd go so far as to guarantee you'll have a seamless experience.

Boston...
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2. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

Thank you for your kind thoughts of my city.

I'm sorry you experienced any ignorant unpleasantness on your previous trip.

So far I have not heard mindless ignorance at the level that I've heard in the past. Unfortunately, we know an ignorant minority exists everywhere.

I hope with all my heart that we as a country have learned from the aftermath of 9/11: You do not fight evil with more evil.

I hope you enjoy your trip.

Edited: 8:47 pm, April 18, 2013
Houston, Texas
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3. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

There are plenty of Muslims in North America. There is plenty of ignorance too. That should not stop you from traveling. I wish you a very pleasant trip.

Pacifica, California
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4. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

They've released pictures of the suspects, and they look like white college fraternity students.

Things won't be as oppressive as you fear..

Edited: 10:14 pm, April 18, 2013
NYC/Israel
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5. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

The wearing of a headscarf does not automatically make you a target. Plenty of people in the US wear head scarfs. I taught in Public School and a good percentage of my students wore them and even more of their parents. Some of the parents are totally covered.

You fear is demonstrating that YOU feel Americans are biased against Moslems. NO, Americans are biased against terrorists--and we do not even know the identity of these. BUT even if they do turn out to be Muslim--unless you supplied the explosives, no one will take it out on you!

South Pole
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6. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

"BUT even if they do turn out to be Muslim--unless you supplied the explosives, no one will take it out on you!"

no one? out of 315 million people?

quite a broad sweeping statement there.

i would think the OP has a good reason to feel at least a little apprehensive.

7. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

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Sydney, Australia
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8. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

#7 Of which we don't know they are yet nor what they look like.

9. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

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Removed on: 10:08 am, April 22, 2013
Edited: 10:08 am, April 22, 2013
Mount Dora, Florida
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10. Re: Travelling to America as a Muslim post-Boston

TSA security is a nightmare for many of us who do not wear headscarves. If you are delayed it will not be because of your head scarf or the color if your husband's skin. It may simply be that you were randomly selected for greater interest. If this happens just be calm, patient and polite.

My son-in-law who has brown skin and the name Muhammad on his passport experienced some racial profiling in the first two years following 9/11. Since then he has rarely been stopped.

I can't guarantee that you will always be treated politely by people in the US. I don't think we are the most gracious and welcoming society, and a certain segment of our society feel comfortable making nasty comments about race, gender, religion, age or anything that makes a person different.

Still I would not be worried. You are traveling in areas where the population is generally well educated, and education almost always reduces prejudice.

I do not think the political climate of the US has changed since the event in Boston, and I would not be concerned about any additional difficulties. My daughter had her sisters-in-law visit most of last summer. They both wore head coverings. They were treated generously and kindly every where we went.