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Jet lag

Sutton Coldfield...
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507 posts
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Jet lag

We are a couple in our mid 60's and are travelling from London to Singapore, for a couple of days then on to New Zealand then to Australia does anyone know what tablets are best to take to prevent jet lag

Amsterdam, The...
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for Amsterdam
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1. Re: Jet lag

I-pads, great for watching movies and keeping you awake.

Greensboro, NC
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2. Re: Jet lag

Melatonin!

Melbourne, Australia
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for Sydney, Bargain Travel, Food and Travel
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3. Re: Jet lag

We all understand you want to make the most of your holidays.

I personally wouldn't suggest taking anything. The usual recommendations of drinking plenty of water, stretching, not consuming alcohol, and as mentioned above - staying awake - to imitate the destination time zone is always the best advice. You can further add to this prior to departure by staying awake later to adjusting sleeping time, in the weeks leading up to your holiday.

The effects of jetlag really depends on the individual, but most feel ok within a short period if time.

If you're really concerned, seek the advice of your GP.

Geneva, Switzerland
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for Geneva, Liechtenstein, Air Travel
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4. Re: Jet lag

Two schools here: the tablets and the no-tablets! I belong to the second one. So for me, just go straight to the new schedule. Wake up at your usual time and try to go to bed at the usual time. A bit harsh on the first couple of days. Then your body will adapt...

England
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5. Re: Jet lag

I wouldn't take tablets. Just do the sensible things like getting straight onto your new time when you get on the plane. Eat and drink in moderation (don't eat too much). Drink plenty of water. Don't sleep for too long on the flight. When you get to your destination try to stay up until it's that country's night time.

You might feel a bit tired but most people don't get severe jet lag IME. Tablets are not needed.

Sutton Coldfield...
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507 posts
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6. Re: Jet lag

Thank you for your help and we will try the no tablet way.

Boston...
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7. Re: Jet lag

You know what you might try? There's a product called No Jet Lag. It's homeopathic, no weird drugged out feeling. I've had mixed success with it, but when it works it's terrific.

Brooklyn, NY
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for New York City
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8. Re: Jet lag

Or you could just drink water, since it's the same thing.

Vancouver, Canada
Destination Expert
for London
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9. Re: Jet lag

There is one thing guaranteed to work: Tincture of Time.

When you board the plane in London, set your watches to Singapore time. When you board the plane in SIN change the watch to NZ time, then again when you fly to Australia.

Long haul flights, like shift work, have an impact on one's homoeostasis no matter what one does, so try to get in the new time zone mode as soon as possible as that's a mental prep. Like Swissidver, I too keep to my usual schedule but in the new time zone. It's a bit rocky for the first day but usually not longer than that.

Melbourne, Australia
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for Sydney, Bargain Travel, Food and Travel
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10. Re: Jet lag

"Long haul flights, like shift work, have an impact on one's homoeostasis no matter what one does, so try to get in the new time zone mode as soon as possible as that's a mental prep. Like Swissidver, I too keep to my usual schedule but in the new time zone. It's a bit rocky for the first day but usually not longer than that"

OP, the above is the perfect explanation and advice from TravellerPlus.

And to give you an indication how frequent flyers cope, here's just a quick example; professional sport teams and individuals use the same method - albeit they allow a lot longer to reach maximum acclimatization (1 day acclimatization for every 1 hour time difference is recommended by the Australian Institue of Sport) - but the point being that they religiously stick by what was mentioned by both Swissdiver and TravellerPlus. We understand this level of adjustment is absolutely not required by the typical tourist, unless of course you're planning on high performance competition of sorts.