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G&G's Clearwater Paradise

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Boat Access Only 123 Mangrove Bight, Guanaja IB2101 Honduras
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#4 of 7 hotels in Guanaja
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We are a boutique hotel with 8 ocean-view, air conditioned rooms, including 2 suites, D'Bonuron Restaurant and Bar, specializing in whole fish, and G's Spot Bar and Game Room. We offer an all-inclusive venue, which includes meals and scuba diving. The owners, George and Ginger, live on-site, and, along with their friendly staff, provide round-the-clock service and excellent meals. We are a water-access-only, secluded property that provides privacy, laid back relaxation, and some of the best scuba diving and fishing in the Caribbean.
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pebid wrote a review Apr 2020
Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming22 contributions2 helpful votes
Eight friends and I went to G&G's in early March. The diving was amazing!! The accommodations were wonderful - simple, but very beautiful! Extremely delicious food. But the best part is the most wonderful staff - very sweet, attentive to our needs, and both the dive and hotel staff were very professional while also being very personable. I truly loved them and the whole trip. AND then.... the lock down happened. Due to coronavirus the Honduran govt. cancelled all flights leaving the country. All inter-island traffic was stopped, a curfew was imposed... G&G's were amazing. They took care of all the drama, made arrangements for us to be able to leave in 10 days (the soonest we could get out), and then totally pampered us until we could leave, including more amazing diving, dinners, and company. I highly recommend them!
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Date of stay: March 2020
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Room Tip: All rooms face the ocean - you can't go wrong!
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Bauman147 wrote a review Feb 2020
Sweetgrass, Montana1,517 contributions227 helpful votes
My dive buddies and I spent a week with George & Ginger at Clearwater Paradise Resort in Guanaja, Honduras. This resort is essentially a bed and breakfast that specializes in diving. We had a good time- my review is divided up into several different categories to explain the things you should keep in mind, and what you should know when deciding whether this is the right place for you: THE DIVING: The dive staff- Wuiti, Popo and Chino- do a wonderful job, have a great sense of humor, and really went above and beyond to make sure we all had great diving experiences. With six or seven divers on the boat each day and at least two tanks per diver (it's not a dive boat, but rather a boat that has been modified to be used as a dive boat), there wasn't much room for suiting up so valet diving is a must! And our dives lasted 60-75 minutes; we remained under water as long as we had air (nitrox) in our tanks, although we frequently had divers getting back on the boat with less than 500 PSI. I actually requested to use a 95 cu tank after the first day of diving because I wasn't comfortable with getting so low. We were also excited that we ended up being allowed to make up some missed dives- the original dive package included three dives per day (one being a night dive). We only managed two dives on our first day (I don't remember why) and two dives on our third day due high winds from a storm that rolled in. Initially George had told us the plan for Thursday was to do our two morning dives, come back from lunch and then either hang out at the resort or go with him to get supplies, followed by the evening dive. But apparently the supply boat(s) didn't come in because of the storm, so he let us do our "usual" three dives plus the night dive and we were ecstatic! The diving- The topography is great- lots of swim-throughs! Although we saw a variety of marine life (a nurse shark, several stingrays, octopus, moray eels, sea cucumber and fish), I expected a lot more sealife. With the exception of the Jado Trader, we were the only divers at every site we visited, and we rarely saw any other dive boats out on the water (Clark's Cay only had two people staying there) so I would have expected a lot more marine life in the water. It's sad to see the bleached reefs that appear to be dying, George was asking for cash donations (the whole resort is cash only) for a save-the-reef fund, but I didn't see anything underwater or above that appeared to be an effort to save the reef- maybe it's part of CORAL and the Healthy Reefs Initiative? I would have been more inclined to donate if I could have figured out exactly what efforts are or will be put forth to save the reef. THE RESORT: The rooms- The beds are very comfortable, and the rooms are quite nice. The water coming out of the faucets was clear, and apparently clean and safe to use; several times I brushed my teeth using water from the bathroom faucet and never got ill (I got a stomach bug in Roatan last year, after I accidentally rinsed my toothbrush in the tap water). Our bathroom had a very large walk-in shower, which was great for rinsing gear and wetsuits. The only thing I found to be lacking was wall hooks to hang for drying, but I probably only noticed because it rained a couple of days we were there so it wasn't practical to hang stuff outside to dry. There was a wardrobe for hanging clothing, but it was made of wood so I didn't want to hang anything wet enough to drip in there- we just draped our wet stuff over the showerhead and faucet handles, wherever we could find space- things dried faster inside with the a/c on. The entry into each room is via a sliding glass door, which has a screen door on one side. Every room has a view of the water. As far as we could tell, the room doors couldn't be locked from the outside and as far as we could tell there wasn't a safe in the room. Luckily, we were the only guests at the resort and we only saw two or three "unknown" people on the grounds the whole week we were there. Outlets are all US plugs, no adapters required, and our room had at least three outlets plus one in the bathroom. THE COMMON AREAS- The wifi is very slow and intermittent. It's also pretty much only accessible on the main level (2nd floor) where the dining room and the two biggest suites are located. Mobile data is also very slow and intermittent (I have T-Mobile), but I was able to access it some of the time I was at the resort. Obviously this is only a problem if you need access to the internet, and knowing that we were in a remote location I wasn't expecting to have wifi at all. On the other hand, the TripAdvisor listing indicates the resort has free high-speed internet, which isn't entirely true (it's free, but it's nowhere near high speed). There is a game room on the third floor that has a pool table, dart board, foosball table (all free to use), a large screen tv, board games and bookshelves with lots of books. This is essentially George's & Ginger's family room so the one night I went up to play pool, Ginger was watching a favorite television show and the volume was up loud enough that it made conversation for the rest of us difficult. But most nights, by the time we finished dinner (around 8 pm) I was just too tired to do anything but start getting ready for the next day so I could go to bed. There is no beach area, although one might be able to sit or layout on the dock once the dive boat is gone. Just off the deck of the resort is a small, round, above ground pool that's about 4 feet deep. Not big enough to swim in, but big enough for cooling off. When the weather cooperates, it's used as a rinse tank. There are also a few lounge chairs and outside tables with chairs. The areas outside of the pool deck area are fenced off, and are beautifully landscaped, so there isn't anywhere to throw a ball around or otherwise engage in outdoor activities- this isn’t a complaint, the property is beautiful, but non-divers should think long and hard about whether they want to tag along here. THE FOOD: Breakfast is served around 7:30 am. By 7 am there was always a big urn of good, hot coffee, a bowl of sugar and a pitcher of milk (or maybe it was cream, not sure, but it was good!) There would also be an urn of hot water and tea bags available around the same time, for the tea drinkers. And breakfast smoothies are available as well. The food is quite good, usually rather plentiful, and based on guests tastes and the availability of ingredients; however, as other reviewers have mentioned, the meals are served whenever they are done being prepared (I don’t think dinner was ever served any earlier than 7 pm). Lunch was often soup, all of which were very good, and one day we had nachos made with plantain chips, which were also delicious! For dinner there is generally one entree and a couple of sides. In other words, this isn’t a restaurant where you order from a menu because the resort can only accommodate about ten people comfortably (and dinner would probably be served even later if they had to make different meals based on what guests ordered). At each meal there is usually a discussion about what will be served at the next meal, and what modifications, if any, need to be made based on guest’s preferences. George and Ginger are as accommodating as they can be under the circumstances, considering the supply boats come in on Thursday- for example, they had to feed our group for about 5 days with only a general idea of our dietary needs, and then (theoretically) would have be able to replenish supplies two days before our departure- although in our case they couldn't really replenish at all because the weather kept the supply boats from coming to the island. It would be an exceptionally good idea to let them know about any food allergies or dietary needs well beforehand, so they have time to stock up or replenish their supply of what you need and/or will eat. For example, we had a lot of tomato-based dishes, which I was happy about because I love tomatoes! But someone that can't eat tomatoes would need to let the resort know in time for them to come up with other dishes and the needed ingredients. George also explained to us that the supply boat wraps all their produce in plastic, which means that it rots faster than normal and sometimes rots on the boat before it arrives on the island when the boat can't come in due to bad weather. We had one vegetarian, one keto, one no-sugar, and another that didn't like onions. As far as cooking goes, they were very accommodating and managed to find something to satisfy everyone. But there was a lot of confusion about which plate went to which person, because rather than put the food out buffet or family style so we could serve ourselves, the plates were filled in the kitchen and then put out in front of the guest. So one plate may have had a side dish with no onions, but maybe another plate ended up with the main entree without onions, instead of them both ending up on the same plate. We are very fortunate that our food issues were all just preferences, and not food allergies. I think that buffet or family style serving would probably result in less food waste too. The first few days of diving I was always ravenously hungry by the time the meal was ready to be served, but after a few days my appetite normalized and I couldn't always finish the heaping plate of food that would have satisfied me the first few days. There were also some dishes that I found tastier than others, and had I been able to serve myself I would have put more of one thing on my plate and less of something else. In the dining room is a jug of water with plastic cups, so you can help yourself to water any time you need it. I love this, because one of my biggest complaints about diving in the Caribbean is the number of diving resorts we have stayed at where it can take 20 to 30 minutes or more before you can get a glass of water! IN GENERAL: Bring lots of mosquito repellant, the mosquitoes are terrible. They are also small and invisible, so you won't see them. You might consider bringing a power strip surge protector if you have a lot of electronics to charge up. I carry one with me on all my travels and it allowed me to keep everything together while charging so I'm less likely to forget something. If you have any must-haves, bring them with you (although you should check with Customs first to make sure it's allowed). Be sure your medications are packed in a carry on, because if your luggage is lost you won't be able to replace them once you get to the island. Some things you might consider bringing: packets for hot beverages (cocoa, spiced cider, etc), flavored creamer, spare batteries (especially specialized batteries for your devices), Save A Dive kit/spare parts, ear plugs (for sleeping at night amid the dogs barking, the cat fights, something tapping on doors and a horrible bug that screeches like a smoke alarm), kleenex or handkerchiefs, rubbing alcohol for drying out ears, sunscreen. Don't plan on buying anything on the island because if you can even get somewhere that has it in stock, it's going to be a very time-consuming trip. For example, it was rather chilly the rainy morning we went out for two dives so I thought it might be nice to take a hot beverage to warm me up after diving. I asked George whether they might have a couple packets of hot cocoa, and expected the answer to be "No." Instead I got a long drawn out explanation about how they don't use packets for instant cocoa because they prefer to make it from scratch, and that he first had to make all of our lunches and snacks for our day on the dive boat and then he would work on making me some hot cocoa from scratch. It was good and I appreciated the time and effort, but frankly if I had known the request was going to be such an imposition I would have just gotten myself more coffee. :) It also should be noted that guests are expected to give George the tip money so that he can use his formula to distribute it among the staff. When I mentioned that I had tipped the three dive guys by giving them cash directly, he got rather upset with me. I had overheard him telling other guests that he had a formula for splitting up the tips based on a formula he had come up with because some of his girls work harder than others, but I didn't realize that this extended to the dive staff as well. And quite frankly, after spending a week listening to George and Ginger talk about how lazy and stupid their three girls (and the other island natives) are, I questioned how much of a tip to leave. It sounds like George does nearly all of the kitchen work. Our room was always clean and made up when we'd return from our two-dive trip each morning, although the room supplies weren't always replenished (one of the guests used his last kleenex early in the trip and the empty box sat in his room the rest of the week), and one of the two kitchen girls, I think her name was Lydia, seemed to work harder than the other. But it's hard to justify leaving much of a tip when it sounds like they really aren't doing much of the work. Obviously there is a limited work force on a remote island like Guanaja, so I understand that George and Ginger could very well have the best employees available for those jobs, but I don't feel compelled to tip well when the employers have spent the whole week venting about their problems and frustrations with their employees.
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Date of stay: January 2020
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Leyla K wrote a review Jan 2020
9 contributions1 helpful vote
+1
Staying at G&G’s Clearwater Paradise Resort is sort of a cross between a stay at a B&B and visiting your mom’s cousin who you don’t know well but he always invited you to stay if you were in town. From the moment we landed in Guanaja, to be greeted by Weetie and Popo (totally not spelling those right!), I knew we were in for a special week. Guanaja is a beautiful green island, so untouched by the commercialism so rampant all over the Caribbean. As soon as we got to the resort, we hopped off the boat and walked up the path to the most beautiful resort house I have ever seen. George and Ginger are born hosts and the house staff was amazing. Every meal was made to order to our specific dietary needs (and we were a pickier group than I had realized!), served with a smile and absolutely delicious! Lionfish ceviche, a seafood boil to die for, gumbo, fresh veggies and fresh fruit topped the list of my favorite meals, but Ginger’s overnight coffee cake and gingerbread pancakes were highlights as well. The housekeeping staff cleaned everything spic and span by the time we got home for lunch after diving. The hammocks are comfy, the drinks are plentiful, and the resident cats and dog made it feel like home. The rooms are clean, comfy and spacious. I could have slept in my shower, it was so big and beautiful. The shower had an outside shower feel inside and I loved it, the AC was cold and the ceiling fans were great. I was happy as a clam! And the diving-the diving!!! As a Roatan diver, it was going to take something special to impress me, and Wheatie, Popo and Chino definitely brought it. A large comfy 43’ dive boat with easy on and off dive access made entry and exit a breeze and the dive staff even put our fins on for us and took them off on the dive ladder. Wheatie made all of us feel comfortable in the water and safe. The reef in Guanaja is beautiful, even though there is the unavoidable coral bleaching. The marine life is spectacular and I even managed to find a nudibranch on my own! Guanaja has amazing and unique volcanic structure underwater that make for amazing swim-thrus. We had 2 nice long relaxing boat dives every morning and 1 boat dive in the afternoon. Popo and Chino are very proud of their boat and kept us in watermelon, crackers and water between dives. All the boat staff was friendly, funny and extremely competent. The boat, tanks and rental gear were all well maintained. Everyone at G&G’s CPR seemed like family and by the time we left, it was hugs all around and promises to come back to visit new friends, who already felt like old friends. I highly recommend Clearwater Paradise Resort-I took a group of people here from my dive shop and George and Ginger made it the most relaxing, low stress trip. Anything we needed, all we had to do was ask. I’ll definitely be back!
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Date of stay: January 2020
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Room Tip: Every room is a good room!
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Response from Ginger B, Owner at G&G's Clearwater Paradise
Responded Jan 29, 2020
Well my dear, we thank you a million times for taking a moment to review us. So glad our staff is so complimented, as they do work hard. The restaurant staff and myself welcome you picky folks anytime. Your group was easy to please and I will cook for them over and over! We would love to see you all back again real soon. You have lots of meals and dive sights yet to experience. I am glad to hear of your favorite meals, and already know the favorite dive sites. Ginger and I both thank you again for allowing us the chance to please you at our little piece of paradise here on Guanaja Island. The whole staff thanks you again too for being wonderful guest. Next time, you will have to come in the dependable weather months and let us come over to Roatan on the 43' Cruiser to pick you up with lunch and Open Bar for the ride back to Paradise!!, George, Ginger and the Crew
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Bruce M wrote a review Jan 2020
Nelson, Canada13 contributions5 helpful votes
At each meal it felt like you were at a friends house or amongst family. It seems each successive meal raised the already high standard to a new level. The dives were great but I personally missed a few dives due to my own ear trouble. I still enjoyed the boat trips, or lounged at the resort. You really are getting away from things on this island and at this resort. George & Ginger are ultimate hosts and make every effort to ensure everyone is happy and accommodated. We were a group of 7 and thoroughly enjoyed our stay
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Date of stay: January 2020Trip type: Traveled with friends
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Response from Ginger B, Owner at G&G's Clearwater Paradise
Responded Jan 26, 2020
I am glad that from the Outside Shrimp/Chicken Grande Stirfry, past the Gumbo/Baked Whole Grouper, wading through the Seafood Boiling Pot spread out amongst friends and the Birthday night with friends hanging around the event grill cooking their Rib Eye steaks/Lion Fish/Shrimp along with the 4 layer Choclate Mousse Cake, you should have found yourself plenty full! I am glad you enjoyed the food, as we enjoyed everyone's company. Thank you so much for choosing to come to our little piece of paradise for some good diving, great food and friendship. I am so sorry you had the ear problem, but surely didnt mind hanging out with you a bit. I am truly glad we were able to make up the dives from the bad weather days. My crew knows whats best and what people like and I hope it shows! Thanks for taking a moment to let others know we are here on Guanaja away from the tourist traps and doing an honest days work, day for day!! We are hoping to see the group again real soon and enjoyed all. George n Ginger
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billp25 wrote a review Dec 2019
Arlington, Texas457 contributions125 helpful votes
+1
This review covers the entirety of the experience at G&G including (1) getting there, (2) what diving is like in Guanaja, (3) quality of the G&G dive operation, (4) and being a guest at G&G. The purpose of this post is not to encourage of discourage en mass, but rather to provide enough information that you are able to make a determination for yourself if G&G is a good match for your kind of (dive) vacation. 1. Getting there – you are going to a small, less populated, bay island in Honduras. So, getting there isn’t going to be “easy”. However, it isn’t going to be “hard” either. It is just going to take a while and you must be prepared and enjoy the journey. For us, we like journeys … we like discovering new places and interacting with new people who may or may not speak our language and know our culture. So … step (1) get to Roatan. We chose to fly to Miami and from Miami to Roatan (and then Roatan to La Ceiba and La Ceiba to Guanaja, whew…). We took a major carrier (American) and getting to Roatan felt like any other trip to a less developed (but popular) dive location. If you’ve been to Cozumel or Bonaire, or any similar place, Roatan will feel familiar. We arrived on a midweek flight so the Roatan airport was quiet. If you arrive on a weekend, expect much more crowds, noise and general buzz . Passing through on a Saturday (10 days later) we experienced the full “excitement” that is a busy/crowded travel day. The journey from Roatan is decidedly less “international dive travel” and more rugged. You are going to be on a local carrier, on a small plane and flying into some small airports. Speaking Spanish is decidedly an advantage, but I made do with my embarrassingly limited capabilities (being humble and apologetic goes a long way in this instances in my experience). There is some talk of the Guanaja dive shops running a ferry type service (it is a couple hours by boat). But that wasn’t an option yet. Once arriving in Guanaja, George met us at the airport and we took us (via boat) the 30 minutes or so to the resort, complete with a sunset cocktail on the way. 2. Diving – One of the major highlights, was that we were often the only divers on the reef. The formations and swim-throughs were beautiful. If you are into smaller creatures, there was plenty of life to keep you occupied (endemic toadfish, nudibranch, bristle worms etc)., especially since there are no other divers chasing them away. However, climate change, overfishing and a severe lionfish invasion has taken its toll on the reefs. We saw an unusually high amount of corral bleaching, and entire patches of reef that were dead and being over-run by algae (it was enough to be depressing). Most larger fish have been fished off the reef, and you’ll only see small examples of larger fish (grouper, tuna etc.). A bright spot for reef conservation, is the news of a small section of reef right in front of G&G’s being recently designated as a Marine Protected Area (MPA). Hopefully, this will help lead to recovery. Witi, their lead divemaster, is solidly dedicated to the “no take” policy from this area. Unfortunately, someone(s) thought it would be a good idea to hand-feed the resident nurse sharks. This has made them lose all fear of divers and quite to the contrary, they now expecting a meal at each visit. Making them somewhat unpredictable and potentially dangerous. 3. G&G Dive Operations – depending upon your point of view, being so remote has advantageous and disadvantages. Each dive is customized to the local conditions and the diver’s diving skills and desires. Concierge gear service is provided, and we found our gear was setup for us and ready to go. We left the dock when we were ready, and we ended our dives when we ran low on air. They have an air fill station on-site which is capable of gas blending (we dove 32% nitrox our entire trip). However, there are also some compromises attributable to the remoteness of the location. I’d suggest double checking and bringing your own spares for any dive equipment that is very important. If something breaks or is forgotten, G&G will do their best to replace/fix the item and they have a well stocked store room, but be prepared that items can take weeks to come from the mainland by ferry. We dove using our own gear, and didn’t have need for rentals or replacements/fixes, however, their gear appeared to be modern and well maintained. The dive boats are well maintained but would not meet USCG standards (no radio, no automated distress beacon, etc.). Similarly, there is only a small first aid kit and there is no oxygen on-board. I did check with DAN and there is a chamber on the island. The tanks appeared to be in good health, however, there was no visual inspection sticker. There is a strict no liquor before diving policy, but less concern with divers diving without dive computers. We found rinsing our gear to be a bit troublesome. There aren’t any rinse tubs or outside rinse or shower areas, instead you go into their above ground pool. This is probably fine when the weather is hot & sunny, but during our stay, the pool was cold. I also worried about the chlorine which is generally not recommended for wet suits. I would suggest brining a snorkel, so you can sink underneath the water and avoid the ever-present and very hungry mosquito population. Oh year, bring lots of mosquito repellent. 4. G&G Resort – rooms were spacious, well apportioned, cleaned daily and the a/c worked awesomely! Hot showers and water pressure were never a problem. There are plenty of power outlets for phones, battery charging, laptops and any other equipment you may need to charge. The bed was very comfortable and well appreciated after dive days! However, if you are noise sensitive, I would suggest bringing earplugs, as most nights the neighbor dogs will bark and the house cats fight. Food was plentiful and George and Ginger made every effort to accommodate any of our requests for adjustments. Ginger would usually go over the next day’s menu the day before, giving us an opportunity for any input or special requests. Generally, you will be served “American style” food. We did have a night where we were served delicious local fare (Pollor con Tajadas), made by Jahaida. My wife had opportunity to hunt lion fish, which was filet by our dive master Witi, and prepared into a truly tasty fish taco by the team in the kitchen. Wine, local beer, cocktails and soft drinks were always available (for a very reasonable/modest per drink fee). Additionally, George was willing to transport us (via boat) to the “city” if we wanted to check out the island, or go into town for dinner/lunch. Coffee, tea and water was free and always available. The dining area was spacious with nice views of the ocean. The game room was very well provisioned (pool, foosball, games, cards) with nice views. 5. One final note, perhaps it was because we were the only guests, however, you should note that George and Ginger live in the same house as where we (the guests) were staying, so it felt much more like being a house-guest in someone’s home more than “at a resort”. If you will like this or not, depends upon what you are looking for. We made it very clear from the beginning that we wanted them to dine with us and to interact with us. So, we were more like “friends” with both the good and the challenges that “friends” who vacation together experience.
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Date of stay: November 2019
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LOCATION
HondurasBay IslandsGuanaja
NUMBER OF ROOMS
8
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Frequently Asked Questions about G&G's Clearwater Paradise
What are some of the property amenities at G&G's Clearwater Paradise?
Some of the more popular amenities offered include free wifi, a pool, and an on-site restaurant.
What food & drink options are available at G&G's Clearwater Paradise?
Guests can enjoy an on-site restaurant and a lounge during their stay.
What are some restaurants close to G&G's Clearwater Paradise?
Conveniently located restaurants include Mi Casa Too, Manati Bar & Restaurant, and Barnacles Restaurant.
Are there opportunities to exercise at G&G's Clearwater Paradise?
Yes, guests have access to a pool during their stay.
Does G&G's Clearwater Paradise have any great views?
Yes, guests often enjoy the ocean view available here.