Things to Do in Oxford

Things to Do in Oxford, MS - Oxford Attractions

Things to Do in Oxford

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    Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
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46 places sorted by traveler favorites
Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
Showing results 1-30 of 46

What travelers are saying

  • Leah S
    2 contributions
    Came for the SEC track and field meet. The workers were very nice and helpful. The campus is beautiful
    Written May 15, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • wrpupkis
    Bangor, ME755 contributions
    We had been there before so we looked forward to walking around the square yet one more time. Great fun.
    Written May 10, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • TravelIntl
    Texas615 contributions
    My husband and I enjoyed our visit to Rowan Oak. Cost is $5 per person and it is self-guided. The young lady working there was very friendly and answered all our questions well. The furnishings in the house belonged to William Faulkner and his family. It was interesting to see how they lived. We walked on the Bailey Woods trail (0.6 miles) to the University of Mississippi Museum.
    Written April 27, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL7,535 contributions
    As a Civil War historian, I'm always drawn to the Confederate Cemetery when I'm in Oxford, Mississippi. It's not as celebrated as Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia, but it is peaceful, serene and pristine. At least it used to be. But things have changed since I wrote a review in September, 2019. On this visit to the Old Miss campus, we immediately became aware of some significant changes. The Confederate Cemetery, located south of Tad Smith Coliseum, was a modest walled lawn with a single monument in the center. Within the wall are buried Confederate soldiers who died after the battle of Shiloh in 1862. During the Civil War, the buildings of Ole Miss were converted into hospitals for the wounded in battle and the casualties were buried here. At one time, the cemetery had individual markers but a groundskeeper removed them to mow and forgot where they belonged. Four thousand soldiers were treated at Ole Miss and 700 are buried in the cemetery, only 340 having been identified. Then, last July, a statue of a Confederate soldier that had stood in front of the Lyceum, Ole Miss' administration building, since 1906, was moved to the cemetery, two weeks after Ole Miss surrendered the last state flag in the United States with a Confederate battle emblem. At the request of the Ole Miss football team, which practices near the cemetery, a temporary mesh screen was placed on the side facing the practice field outside Vaught-Hemingway Stadium. Permanent landscaping is planned.
    Written April 19, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Princerman
    Otsego, MN806 contributions
    The game we attended (vs Texas A&M) was excellent. The stadium itself does lend itself to some limitations on game day. The concourses are incredibly narrow and there are all sorts of little stairways all over. The light show during the game is neat to watch. The pulled pork sandwiches I had were outstanding. Ole Miss desperately needs to fix the bus situation that takes you to the satellite parking lots. The people running the buses were unorganized and the lines were haphazard.
    Written November 14, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Dorothy A
    Jacksonville, FL26 contributions
    This is a great place to visit.I enjoy walking in this park as it is so peaceful and lots to see. It is a must when visiting Oxford.
    Written April 25, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • swillisx1
    1 contribution
    I'm not in very good shape so have so far only made it to the .5 mile marker. I really wish there was a bench there as the way it is I have to walk a mile to get back to one.
    Does anyone know if there is anywhere to park along the trail other than at Chucky Mullins Drive? Parking there is always in short supply.
    Written February 26, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • TravelIntl
    Texas615 contributions
    My husband and I walked on this trail from Rowan Oak to the University of Mississippi Museum. The trail is 0.6 miles and it took us about 15 minutes. Strollers and bicycles are not allowed on the trail. The trail has a lot of exposed tree roots and steps.
    Written April 27, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL7,535 contributions
    The Lyceum and the Circle Historic District is a historic area on the University of Mississippi campus in Oxford, Mississippi that includes eight buildings and several monuments and was significant for its association with the civil rights movement during the Ole Miss riot of 1962 which resulted in the enrollment of James Meredith as the school's first African-American student. The Circle was designated as a National Historic Landmark and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2008. The centerpiece of the Circle is the Lyceum, the university's administration building which was built in 1848 and is the only surviving original structure on the campus. In 1962, the confrontation between Federal troops and white students and outside segregationists took place in front of the Lyceum. Other buildings are Brevard Hall, Croft Institute for International Studies and Carrier, Shoemaker, Ventress, Bryant and Peabody dormitory halls. The Circle is surrounded by University Circle, a road designed for one-way traffic that is lined by oak and magnolia trees, beds of pansies and expanses of grass. Since the mid-19th century, the Circle has been the focal point and historic core of the Ole Miss campus. Brevard Hall, the old chemistry building, was built in 1923. Two-story Ventress Hall was built in 1889. Bryant Hall, which housed the university's library from 1911 to 1952, now is home to the Fine Arts Center and the departments of Philosophy, Religion and Classics.
    Written April 19, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • TravelIntl
    Texas615 contributions
    My husband and I enjoyed visiting this museum. The Museum Director greeted us warmly and was very welcoming. The young lady working at the front desk was friendly. The museum does not charge admission so that it is accessible to all. They used to charge admission for the special exhibits but no longer do that. We enjoyed seeing the very detailed ink drawings from an Italian artist in the 18th century. The scientific instruments were very interesting. There was a good collection of ancient Roman artifacts also. This small museum is well worth a visit!
    Written April 27, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Dorothy A
    Jacksonville, FL26 contributions
    We have visited the Grove on the Ole Miss campus many times. It's always a nice place to walk and see all the students and the little robots that deliver food.
    Written April 25, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • CES122
    Canton, MS812 contributions
    One of the better locations for rustic items. Estate sale items. Worth 1-2 hours depending on what items interest you. Easy location to find.
    Written June 29, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Cyndi G
    Oxford, MS189 contributions
    I went to College Hill Presbyterian during my college years with my Granny who was a member along with her husband for many, many years. I knew then some of the history and enjoyed when the church ate on the grounds. I recently discovered a family member buried there through ancestry.com. Now my old and recent visits (to see the cemetery) are all the more richer.
    Written December 22, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Sdurdin
    Southaven, MS564 contributions
    We love playing USSSA baseball tournaments at FNC Park. The turf fields look great and allow for quicker play after rain. The park set up is spread out and easy to get in and out of. They also have a popular soccer complex here. Concession stands and bathrooms are always clean. The typical admission fee is $5 per person, per day.
    Written April 30, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Taylor B
    Chicago, IL7,535 contributions
    The more we travel, the more we learn. This is the third time that my wife and I have visited Oxford, Mississippi, and until today we had never heard of Lucius Quintus Cincinnatus Lamar II. If someone had mentioned his name yesterday, I would have said he was a Roman senator. But Lucius Q.C. Lamar was a distinguished 19th century statesman who lived in a historic home at 616 North 14th Street that was added to the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark in 1975. The house is noted for its hand-painted frescoes in the main hallway. Lamar's fascinating life is explored and many of his personal possessions are on display in the four main rooms of the house. Lamar, who lived in the house from 1869 to 1888, was two-time member of the U.S. House of Representatives, then served as Secretary of the Interior and a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. He wrote the Mississippi Secession Ordnance and served in the Civil War as a Confederate cavalry officer. Politically, he opposed civil rights legislation. Lamar Boulevard in Oxford is named for him. The house is open to the public and admission is free. Now you know who Lucius Q.C. Lamar was.
    Written September 14, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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