Specialty Museums in New Delhi

Top Specialty Museums in New Delhi, India

Specialty Museums in New Delhi

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What travelers are saying

  • kartik Shrivastava
    Bhopal, India305 contributions
    It is a great place for Rail fans. All the information related to Indian railways is available in the museum. Train rides are also available that can be enjoyed by kids as well as young and old ones. A number of old locomotives and coaches are also available to explore. Overall a nice place to visit in Delhi.
    Written June 6, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • smvNYC
    New York City, NY247 contributions
    Our tour guide suggested to visit this place instead of the Lotus Temple and we were thankful for that. Being weekend, the area attractions were crowded. Yet Gandhi Smriti was not, and we had the opportunity to enjoy the beautifully maintained grounds, learn about Gandhi, life, work and death and understand better the history of India. Most impressive were the staff. We found them all smiling and accommodating, as they seemed to have a strong understanding of the importance and solemnity of the place!
    There is also a shop with books and handicrafts related to Gandhi's work. The prices were surprisingly low.
    Written August 6, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SAROJ8585
    Bokaro Steel City, India1,500 contributions
    National Gandhi museum contains huge picture gallaries depicting Gandhis life,work and ideals in photographs ,artworks,paintings and his relics.It also contains a well maintain specialized library having nearly 40000 books,magazines,his correspondence,books on world peace and religions
    Written May 31, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,964 contributions
    The National Museum spreads out over two floors of the massive National Museum building near India Gate. You enter from Gate No. 3; just before you enter, there’s the ticket counter (charges are Rs 20 per adult for Indians, Rs 500 for foreigners; no camera fee is charged for private photography, though a flash is not allowed). Past security, you turn left and go towards the main museum. On the way, a path leads towards a relatively recently inaugurated annex which includes, among other facilities, a cafeteria and a souvenir shop.

    Free guided tours begin from the main foyer of the museum, on the ground floor, at fixed times, and are regularly announced. On our latest visit to the museum, in May 2022, we only wanted to visit two special exhibitions, so we skipped this tour, but if you have limited time and only want to see the highlights of the collection, this is probably a good option.

    The museum has many galleries spread over two floors. There is lots of truly breathtaking stone sculpture, in particular, that I have always admired, from ancient and medieval India. Harappa, the Gupta Empire, the Mughal Empire, the great Southern kingdoms of the Chalukyas, Cholas, Vijayanagar, etc: all are represented, and many more, with artefacts of many different kinds. There’s plenty of painting, everyday goods, furniture, clothing, and other objects from all eras of India’s history. There are also some fine collections from overseas, including East Asia, and a recently inaugurated Central Asia gallery.

    In addition, the Museum holds frequent special exhibitions, which are invariably carefully curated and worth seeing. The ones we saw in May were an exhibition on Kashi, and a fabulous one, comprising of some 200 paintings, of Company Art.

    The museum building has toilets on every floor, drinking water, benches at strategic locations, and—a big draw with the kiddies—little DIY stations in the main corridor, beside the windows, where you can do everything from making paper necklaces (like the ones shown on famous old stone statues, materials and instructions provided) to colouring illustrations of museum exhibits. Our eight-year old had a lot of fun making a necklace. Beyond that, there’s also a little post box, with postcards provided that you can write to yourself and slip into the post box to send.

    All in all, a very good introduction to India’s history and heritage. I do wish they hadn’t gone overboard in some places with the electronics; in the foyer and around, for instance, some wonderful statues have been pretty much obscured with obtrusive electronics displays in front of them.

    If you live in or around Delhi and can visit the Museum frequently, I’d recommend exploring this over several visits. There’s so much to see, doing more than (say) three galleries at a go can make it too much to absorb at one time.
    Written June 1, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SAROJ8585
    Bokaro Steel City, India1,500 contributions
    The indian air force museum is located at the Palam air force station.It stores the rich history of Indian air force.In this museum photographs of brave officers are displayed .many war aircrafts are also kept here.
    Written June 4, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,964 contributions
    The Sulabh International Museum of Toilets is part of the organization's institute of sanitation. Surrounded by green gardens (it's very fertile, and you can guess why - these plants get some of the best manure in town!), the museum is free for visitors. You can visit any day of the week; they're open most days from 10 to 6, on Sundays and other holidays from 10 to 5.

    There are two parts to the museum: an outdoor area and an indoor one. The outdoor one is devoted to Sulabh's work of setting up cheap, eco-friendly toilets that are accessible to all. Under an outdoor covered stretch, there are lots of different models of toilets, for different capacities, and showing the working of different types of cess pits, and so on. In the adjoining gardens, there are three statues symbolizing the work of Sulabh: of Gandhiji, Dr Ambedkar, and Dalit woman.

    The most informative part of the museum is indoors, where, across one medium-sized room, there is crammed tons of information about toilets, hygiene and sanitation, and related aspects. There are framed sections of abundant text about everything from historical toilets (in Harappa, Babylon, Rome, medieval Europe, the forts of India, etc) to toilet etiquette in ancient India, to the norms about peeing and pooping in public, disposal of waste, and so on. There are astounding (and hilarious) anecdotes; inventions and innovations through the ages; toilet humour; crazy news (one about a gem-encrusted toilet seat Jennifer Lopez used to lug around as her own private porta-potty); and much, much more. There are models, of discreetly concealed old commodes, disguised as grand chairs or stacks of leather-bound books; of various types of toilets and disposal systems. There are even actual commodes, such as an incinerator, a tent-compatible toilet, a porta-potty, and so on.

    The text is well-written, the exhibits carefully curated and very informative. The problem is that it's not very thoughtfully arranged; most of the text is in the form of framed sections, the paper all yellowed, the images faded. Sometimes the text is hung too high to be easily visible, and some of it is just too much text, without much relief.

    But, despite those drawbacks, still an amazingly interesting museum. To understand the entire history of toilets and sanitation around the world, this is the place to come.
    Written June 1, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,964 contributions
    One of several planetariums set up to disseminate an interest in and an awareness of astronomy among the general public, the Nehru Planetarium in Delhi is located within the grounds of Teen Murti Bhawan, once the home of India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru. The planetarium has a small gallery of exhibits relating to astronomy (both related to India, and globally), but you see this only as a preliminary to the main focus of the planetarium, which is the show.

    The show at the planetarium is in two languages: English at 11.30 AM and 3 PM, and Hindi at 1:30 PM and 4 PM. Tickets for each show cost Rs 80 for an adult, and Rs 50 for a child above 4 years of age. The show is about 40 minutes long, and the ticket counter opens half an hour before the start of the next show.

    As soon as you’ve bought a ticket, you can enter the planetarium building and spend the time until your show starts looking at the exhibits, which include some interesting information on ancient astronomy (including models of the Jantar Mantar, insights into pioneers like Galileo and Herschel, how the ancients across the world viewed and interpreted the skies, and so on). There are lots of fascinating facts about planets, the sun, outer space, and more; an old space suit worn by an Indian astronaut; information about missions to the rest of the solar system; etc.

    For the show, you go into the Sky Theatre, which is a circular theatre with a high domed roof. Try to get a seat as near the centre as possible; this way, when the show projects onto the sides of the theatre, you won’t be having to crane your neck right around to see what’s happening. The show is a really fascinating one, well scripted and well executed, which covers lots of interesting facets about the solar system: its evolution, how mankind has perceived the solar system, how studies and explorations have been carried out, and what facts have been unearthed about other planets, asteroids, comets, etc. It’s informative, interesting, and visually very striking.
    Written July 1, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sachin Rathore
    New Delhi, India45 contributions
    The Rashtrapati Bhavan Museum has been conceptualised with great beauty. It presents before you the Power of India, from the British era to current Democratic Indian. An unique opportunity to see important items, dresses, pen, furniture, gifts and documents associated with all the Presidents of India. You will be amazed to see the old car of the President of India, the replica of his Buggy, the luxuries of Rashtrapati Bhavan. It is a must visit for Students.
    Written January 25, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Talcom
    1 contribution
    For record, this is the only museum I have been to not once but twice for the amusement it has to offer is not something you should refrain from sharing with travel buddies whether they are friends or family. So once, I chose to go with a friend and the second time I accompanied my family and I can't really decide who liked it better. In spite of the age differences and gaps, we all seemed to love it equally. On one end was my baby brother whose whole life is surrounded with toys while on the other was my granny on whose mind, dolls would be the last thing.
    Along with a rich history of how the great Shankar Pillai managed to capture culture and History in a museum just through dolls to inspire any adult student of social sciences to the point of captivating the fantasies of an 8 year old to take those dolls home, the museum doesn't fail to amaze you whoever you are and whatever age group you belong to. For the mothers torn between their favourite historical monument and their child's dream amusement park, this is the place your whole family would explore in unison with no complaints.
    Written October 15, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Tarique S
    New Delhi, India535 contributions
    If there is any place for philatelists to savour the experience of Postal Stamps Collection, then it surely is either a museum or an exhibition. National Philatelic Museum is one such place which caters, a relishing experience, not only to philatelists but to non-collectors as well.

    Located on Sansad Marg, opposite to Gate No 3 of Patel Chowk Metro Station, inside the Dak Bhawan, this amazing museum should be on the bucket list of all the stamp collectors. Behind the humble entrance of the museum, lies a collection of some of the most beautiful and rarest of the rare postal stamps, ever printed by Indian Postal Department.

    As you walk through the gallery of this beautiful museum you will find that the collections has been fittingly curated into distinct categories. Indian aviation, space technology, art and culture, flora and fauna, eminent personalities, historical monuments are few to mention. There is a section which meticulously displays the Indian Postal Stamps in chronological order from 1948 to till date. Handpicked foreign postal stamps are also on display at this museum.

    There is also a souvenir shop inside the museum, where you can purchase recently printed Indian Postal Stamps and other philately related stuffs (payment can be done only through cash).

    The museum also has a projector with sitting arrangements where the department people, with the help of educational videos, imparts knowledge about postal stamps and its printing procedure (displayed only during group visit).

    I personally believe that this museum should be visited by people of all age group. It is informative, relishing, fun and a perfect delight to see those beautiful little piece of paper with lots of stories behind it.

    Important Infos:
    1. Museum can be reached by metro (yellow Line). It is just opposite to Patel Chowk Gate No 3 exit.
    2. There is a big paid parking space behind the metro station. Parking would cost INR 30 for 3 hours.
    3. There is no entry fee for Museum. You just need to enter your name in the register, kept at the entrance.
    4. The Museum opens at 10 am and closes at 5 pm.
    5. This Museum is quite close to Connaught Place (another popular place in Delhi).
    Written January 2, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Cedric N
    Mumbai, India576 contributions
    Had visited this crafts museum in New Delhi a long back ago. This museum is a popular tourist attraction and is visited by tourists.

    This museum located at the corner of Pragati Maidan. It is commonly known as National Crafts Museum. This museum houses a village showcasing wooden artifacts, embroidery, artificial jewelry, handicrafts etc. It also has an auditorium, a laboratory, research and documentation facilities etc. This museum is run by the Ministry of Textiles, Government of India. There are various galleries within the museum. It is open from 9.30 am to 5 pm. This museum is closed on Mondays. It is accessible from Pragati Maidan metro railway station. Had admired the different types of handicrafts and observed the Craftsmen creating the beautiful handicrafts as a school going child.

    This museum is an ideal place for families as well as school children. It is a must visit place and should not be missed when in New Delhi.
    Written January 10, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Basho
    London, UK4 contributions
    I was interested by a large golden case in one corner. It was holding a glass display cabinet in the centre about head height. As I drew closer I could see that this was in the Thai style of design and amazingly intricate. Hundreds of what looked like Deva sat at the foot of the case, wrapped around the sides and carved into respectful attitudes. Atop them, flanked by four golden pillars, was a simple, and not particularly clean, display cabinet. Inside were some bone looking relics sat on a red cushion stand. Separating us from the case was a simple plastic wall, but I remember feeling that I was really close to it and leaned in to see as close as possible. Hmm, I thought, what’s this? I leaned back and looked at the plaque.

    “Holy Relics of Lord Buddha”







    I have thought long and hard about how to describe what went through my mind at that moment, but in the end I think the above ellipses are the only thing I can say.

    In Thailand there are temples of enormous size, prodigious aspect and mightily special prominence that house a single statue of this man.

    In Singapore there is a temple 6 stories high built to house 3000 golden carved likenesses of this man.

    In Laos there are thousands of people who dedicate their life so much to studying this man’s way that they have no time to feed themselves and have to beg food off the towns-people, who dutifully line up every day to hand out the provisions.

    In China, a particular carving of this man is forty-foot high.

    In Japan, wooden temples to this man’s way are so large that you would need serious rock climbing gear to scale them.

    In Sri Lanka a tooth from this man is so holy that thousands congregate daily at the temple housing it in a continuous ever-moving horde.

    However, in India – the home of his birth – they just plonk his remains in a glass case.



    My brain unfroze.
    Written March 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,964 contributions
    One of the Delhi Metro’s important stations (also one of its earliest stations to be opened) is the one at Patel Chowk. Here, above the platforms but within the station’s premises, is the Metro Museum, a small two-gallery museum that focuses on the work of the Delhi Metro.

    The museum includes a set of models of different trains used by the Metro; it also has a model (along with a detailed description of how it works) of a tunnel-boring machine, as well as a cross-section of a machine. There are full-size mannequins sporting the different uniforms worn by DMRC’s workers, a tool kit used for maintenance, and the different types of helmets worn. There is a history of the DMRC and the phases in which work has been carried out to take the NCR’s Metro network to where it is now.

    For me, one of the most interesting bits about the museum was a section on ‘interesting facts about the Delhi Metro’: how many escalators across the network (1,000), the deepest station (Hauz Khas, 30 mt), the highest point (Dhaula Kuan, as tall as a 7-storey building), tallest escalator in India (Janakpuri West), how many times the Metro’s train doors open and close in a day (25 lakh), and so on. This was really fascinating and impressive.

    There’s no entrance fee for the Museum, which is basically just a series of exhibits on either side of the passage leading to the exit gates. However, since it is within the area between the exit gates and the platforms, you do need to have a smart card or token in order to view it.
    Written November 30, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • arpitam
    Gurugram (Gurgaon), India678 contributions
    Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam needs no introduction and so does his memorial needs no recommendation. One should pay visit (a way of paying homage) to our great leader and inspiration for the Indians. The place is very well maintained although there is no entry fee. Backpacks and camera are not allowed inside, but one can carry mobile which has to be switched off. The memorial is very organized with hundreds of photographs framed and walled depicting the work of the great leader and scientist. It also houses his personal belongings and showcases the last baggage he carried to IIT Shillong.
    Just one suggestion; all the photographs displayed here are having historical significance; so those really need appropriate captions for the visitors to comprehend.
    Written March 25, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sonja L
    New Delhi, India12 contributions
    Had a great time at the EXPO, a must see
    They have a beautiful garden. And inside was very quiet. A monk gave me the holy book as a gift and I really enjoyed the light-show. I was a woman on my own and I was the only one to see the light show, but a security lady escorted me, i was very happy.
    Written November 27, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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