Ancient Ruins in New Delhi

Ancient Ruins in New Delhi, India

New Delhi Ancient Ruins

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What travelers are saying

  • Noyo
    New Delhi, India3 contributions
    This park is super rich with history, best if you go with a knowledgeable guide who can add context. I would advise to go in a group of 3-4 people if you're not a Delhi local. Women should not go here alone, especially near sunset or sunrise, as some unsavoury people may roam around nearby. Do dress conservative.

    Entry is free. One of the park exits leads to a road that reads to the Bhool Bhulaiya (not really a maze, just a big multi arched rounded tomb type structure worth visiting). You can find it on Google Maps, it's a few minutes away on foot.

    The ASI or some trust badly needs to conduct maintenance here.
    Written December 27, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • JoyBose
    Bengaluru, India344 contributions
    I visited this fort in October 2020. Ticketing was via mobile app only due to Covid restrictions. It is in the care of Archeological Survey of India. Entry fee is Rs 20 for Indians, 250 for foreigners, includes both the fort and Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq tomb. There is car parking outside.

    The fort is majestic and covers a huge area of maybe 5-6 sq km, maybe half of which is demolished and now covered in forests and residential housing. It is surrounded by a now dried up moat. The outer walls are quite thick.

    Still, the walls are majestic and the remaining buildings do give an idea of the huge fort. There are a number of buildings at higher and lower levels, including residential areas, kitchen, prisons etc. From one of the higher points in the fort, one can see the entire surrounding countryside.

    There are a lot of monkeys in the complex. There are also cows that are brought for grazing by the villagers. But they dont bother humans anyway.

    Opposite the fort is the Ghiyasuddin Tughlaq tomb, formerly part of the same complex but now separated by a road.

    It is one of the 7 cities of Delhi and therefore a must see for people interested in architecture and history.
    Written October 29, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Jovial Holiday
    New Delhi, India86 contributions
    The grand fort of the Feroz Shah Kotla Fort Delhi is very unusual because of its number of peculiarities. You can visit amazing sites like Baoli, gardens, and monuments like Masjid around the Feroz Shah Kotla Fort.
    Written February 6, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • JoyBose
    Bengaluru, India344 contributions
    It's an unfinished minar but a much wider scale and circumference than qutub minar. Only one floor was completed. One can only guess by looking at it, how big it would have been. It's a massive stone structure.
    Written January 24, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Pardip
    Patna, India130 contributions
    A good land mark and a very historical place,it was building by the mughal emperor akbar sah but completed by bshadur sah zafar, its architectural is great
    Written December 28, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,583 contributions
    Razia Sultan (CE 1205-1240) was the only woman to sit on the throne of Delhi, having been named successor by her father, Iltutmish. Razia’s reign was a short one, since she had to battle a powerful clique of nobility at the court in Delhi, as well as external enemies. She was eventually defeated in battle and forced to flee, eventually dying in Kaithal, near Karnal.

    One would have expected Razia’s tomb, given that she was a Sultan, to be more impressive—and more close to where she had ruled (which would have been around the Mehrauli area). However, possibly because of the proximity of the tomb of the Sufi mystic Turkman Bayabani (the graves of holy people being believed to confer blessings on the area around them), she was buried here, fairly far to the north of where she ruled from.

    The tomb itself is unimpressive: instead of a domed roof (or any sort of roof), there is just a small walled enclosure with two cenotaphs, both made of random rubble masonry—no ornamentation, nothing to indicate that this is the last resting place of a Sultan. One grave is Razia’s, the other is unidentified but local legend has it that this is the grave of Razia’s sister Sazia. Beside the cenotaphs, to one side, is a small mosque which has been built fairly recently. If you’re entering the mosque area, make sure you remove your footwear.

    Getting to Razia’s Tomb is a little convoluted, but the locals are well aware of where it is, and how to get there: remember to ask for Bulbulikhana, which is the exact name of the neighbourhood where the tomb stands.
    Written December 31, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • rupeshbits
    New Delhi, India341 contributions
    It is one of beautiful architecture which you will really love to see once. It's a small historical place but it's architecture is amazing. but unfortunately it is the neglected one. t is tomb of Abdul Rahim Khan-e-Khana (17 December 1556 – 1627), also known as Rahim was a poet who lived during the rule of Mughal emperor Akbar.
    Written May 31, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Arindam Sarkar
    New Delhi, India265 contributions
    Well maintained, clean place,l in almost centre of Dwarka.
    Not very big.
    Good place to visit for about 30 mins.
    More so as such places are rare in west Delhi (although abundant in Central and south delhi).
    Written October 4, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Nikko4Me
    Milford, MA5,831 contributions
    Unfortunately, the only day we had to tour was Monday, but Hauz Khas was closed. There was not much to see from the gate.
    Written February 18, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Kumar S
    New Delhi, India421 contributions
    Satpula was an excellent water storage system and reservoir build during Mughal era. The dam still stands, though is in dire need of conservation.
    Written May 26, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Nom Nom Diaries
    New Delhi, India38 contributions
    Interior of Alai Darwaza, resembling Timber ornamentation, Qutb complex.
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    Alai Darwaza - A small sandstone structure in the Qutub Complex.
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    What: The Alai Darwaza
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    info: The Alai Darwaza is a magnificent gateway built by Ala-ud-din Khilji of the Delhi Sultanate,
    having exquisite inlaid marble decorations and latticed stone screens.
    It highlights the remarkable artisanship of Turkish and local artisans who worked on it.
    The Alai Darwaza was an important part of the project undertaken by Ala-ud-din Khilji in his quest to decorate the Qutab complex. .

    More: The Alai Darwaza is a perfect specimen of architecture belonging to the period of the Delhi Sultanate. It was built in 1311, by Ala-ud-din-Khilji, of the Khilji dynasty (which ruled the Delhi Sultanate from AD 1290 to AD 1316). The Alai Darwaza was a part of Ala-ud-din-Khilji’s extension of the Quwwat-ul-Islam mosque. It was one of the four grand gateways; the other three could not be completed because of the death of Ala-ud-din in AD 1316.
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    Where: Next to Qutub Minar
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    Nearest Metro Station: Qutub Metro Station. 2 Km Away
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    How to Reach: After Metro, You can opt a Sharing Auto by paying Rs 10/ or you can opt Ola/Uber cab Rs 50/-
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    Entrance Fee: Rs 30 for Indian Rs 500 For foreigners.
    (DSLR and Selfie Sticks are allow free of cost but Camera stand isn't allow)
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    Timing: Sunrise to Sunset
    Written August 10, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,583 contributions
    One of the most prominent historical structures next to the Hauz Khas lake—besides the madrasa and Firoz Shah Tughlaq’s tomb, that is—is Munda Gumbad. Instead of being part of the madrasa complex (which is now a ticketed complex), Munda Gumbad is situated diagonally across from the madrasa and lies within the Hauz Khas District Park Area. Munda Gumbad sits atop a low hill, with large trees growing all around it.

    Although most people associate Munda Gumbad only with the great view and the fact that the surrounding lawns are good for picnics, this is also an interesting historical structure. Built in the Khalji era, this is the tomb of unidentified nobleman and was once topped by a dome - which has since collapsed, which is why the name ('munda' in this case means 'headless').

    Interestingly, Munda Gumbad once marked the centre of the Hazu Khas water tank, which had been excavated by Alauddin Khalji. Just by that, you can guess how huge the tank initially was, and how much it's shrunk ever since.
    Written December 31, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • shek2005
    Mumbai, India829 contributions
    This is the structure which is located within the Red Fort complex .. the local did explain very well on the history
    Written January 30, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,583 contributions
    When the Mughal Emperor Akbar inherited the throne after the death of his father Humayun, among the most popular men in his court was Shamsuddin Mohammad Atgah Khan, whose wife, Jiji Anga, had been one of Akbar’s foster mothers. Atgah Khan’s tomb was built in 1566-67 CE by his son, Mirza Aziz Kokaltash, in close proximity to the Dargah of Nizamuddin Auliya (one of many tombs in the vicinity: the belief being that being buried near the grave of the saint would confer blessings on the departed).

    Atgah Khan’s tomb lies outside the Dargah Complex, so you do not need to go all the way to the Dargah; just before the Dargah, there’s a narrow passage going off to the right (ask the local shopkeepers, they’ll point the way) and you are there. No entry fee is charged, and since there is no guard around either, the enclosure here is in pretty bad shape, with rubble, empty liquor bottles, and other rubbish lying around. Also, the more modern double-storeyed buildings right next to the tomb enclosure have been partly demolished and look in serious danger of falling right over!

    But the tomb itself is beautiful. This is a fairly small domed tomb, in the shape of an irregular octagon (a Baghdadi tomb). Its sides are decorated in a perfectly symmetrical medley of decorative techniques: inlay work, tile work, carved sandstone, and carved white marble. I have been here many times over the years, but never fail to be awed by the beauty of this tomb. Beside the tomb is a wall mosque, its closed arches still bearing some of the colourful tiles originally used to decorate it.
    Written February 29, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Joelson H
    1 contribution
    Hello all, in 2018 my wife and I went to a 3 weeks trip to India, we used Saffron Travels to organise our itineraries, hotels, guides/drivers, internal flights, etc. Their services are really complete, they pick you at the airports, drive to the hotels, pick you at arranged times and places. Pravesh and his team are amazing, the days were well organised with activities that allowed us to comfortably enjoy all that India has to offer us. We had an amazing time in India and Saffron Travels team made everything more special. if you are looking for travel agency to organise your trip in India we would undoubtedly recommend their services, Thank you very much Pravesh and team, Namaste
    Written February 23, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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