Sights & landmarks in Nagasaki

Top Sights in Nagasaki, Japan

Nagasaki Landmarks

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  • Rumples
    Tucson, AZ11,160 contributions
    A friend and I visited this small, tranquil park on a hot, humid October morning. It was high on our list of Nagasaki's peace-related attractions, instituted since an atomic bomb was dropped nearby on Aug. 9, 1945. To access the grounds, which spread across the top of a hill, we took an escalator instead of the myriad stairs from street level.

    The Peace Memorial Fountain greeted us with two water jets, designed to represent the dove of peace. This fountain symbolizes the desperate need for water that the blast's initial survivors had. From here, we could see the huge bronze Nagasaki Peace Statue at the rear of the park and walked directly to the big rock pedestal that supports the massive 33-feet-high bronze work.

    Symbolism runs rampant in the statue, which depicts a seated, mostly unclad muscular man. His right arm points to the sky, while the left arm remains outstretched. One leg is folded and the other is bent. Confused about how this represented peace, I was happy to see a nearby information board in English. A black marble vault by the statue holds the names of the blast's immediate victims and its survivors, who subsequently died.

    On the east and west sides of the park, we stopped to view about 18 much smaller peace-related monuments. They had been donated by various countries and offered signs in English. The entire area was nicely landscaped, well maintained and had benches, where visitors could rest.

    The park offers a perfect location, just a 5-minute walk from ground zero. It is easily reached by the blue line, tram stop Matsuyamamachi.
    Written September 14, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Daniel H
    Bailey, CO28 contributions
    I've visited this area many times and never get tired of the history and beauty. My friend Chad Dupont who lives and works in Omura has had a weekly YouTube VLOG, Discovering Nagasaki from a Local, on various topics and venues near Nagasaki and Omura. Episode 14 which features Glover Garden and Okonomiyaki is well worth checking out.
    Written April 24, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tamara h
    Adelaide, Australia14 contributions
    We walked here from our hotel, was an easy walk. We caught the lift up and then the Ropeway. This was at night time and the views at night with all the lights was fantastic, but was very cold up the top. Well worth a look.
    Written February 18, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Rumples
    Tucson, AZ11,160 contributions
    After visiting Nagasaki’s Peace Park, we stopped at nearby ground zero en route to the Atomic Bomb Museum. A simple black monolith here, surrounded by concentric white circles, marks the spot, where the atomic bomb exploded above at 500 meters (about 1640 feet) on Aug. 9, 1945. Five steps lead up to the pillar, which stands on a grassy mound. An information plaque gives details in English about the blast, which occurred at precisely 11:02 a.m. I found the statistics to be staggering: an estimated 74,000 people died by the end of the year and about 75,000 endured injuries and radiation-related illnesses. The city lay in ruins.

    Part of a wall from Urakami Cathedral, which stood in the neighborhood and was destroyed by the blast, is displayed by the monolith. Nearby steps descend to where ground level was located at the time of the bombing. A stream runs here and attracted people still alive from the blast, who were desperately seeking water. A display here includes roof tiles and bricks from homes demolished by the explosion.

    Back at today’s ground level, we sat on a bench and reflected on what happened here. A statue across from us that depicts a woman carrying her dying child In her arms added to my musings. Only a few people explored this area on the late morning in October when we visited. They were extremely quiet.
    Written September 16, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • cjbh
    Salt Lake City, UT164 contributions
    Only 500 yards from ground zero, this church was almost obliterated by the bomb in 1945. Only a corner was left standing, which was moved to the Ground Zero Park. Rebuilt now, it's something of a pilgrimage site.
    Before WWII, it was the center of the (formerly) Hidden Christians who managed to keep their faith alive for 250 years in hiding, despite persecution and the most gruesome executions by the government. They came out of hiding when religious freedom was declared in the late 1800's.
    Drive around the far end of the Peace Park, and up the hill to the red brick church.
    Notice the heads blown off statues of saints, found in the rubble, and placed all in a row.
    Written December 24, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • nldogbert
    Eindhoven, The Netherlands3,075 contributions
    This is quite a unique attraction and one of the (most probably) worlds only elevator/funicular ride. Best thing is that it is free and at the top, you do get a beautiful view of the area - both day and night view.
    Written September 17, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Udon_omori
    17 contributions
    Might look like your regular shrine, but there are some interesting details to be found such as money multiplying fountain (said to double the amount of money you wash there)x Spinning statue, mini zoo, etc.
    Written April 1, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Rumples
    Tucson, AZ11,160 contributions
    This was our first stop on the October afternoon we arrived in Nagasaki, because of our interest in Nagasaki's early Western-style elements, found mostly in this immediate area. The white church with blue-gray accents originally went up in 1864 as a place of worship for European residents. But it was damaged during the Atomic bomb blast and rebuilt. As a history buff, I found it fascinating that the church attracted the hidden Japanese followers of Christianity, who came to quietly worship here, because a ban on the religion in Japan still remained in effect.

    That ban had resulted in 26 Christians, now saints, being crucified in Nagasaki during 1597 for practicing their religion. A monument to these martyrs has been erected on Nishizaka Hill and we went there later from the main railroad station, about a 13-minute walk away. Oura Catholic Church is also known as the Church of the 26 Martyrs.

    Myriad steep steps lead to the entrance and I saw no obvious access for those with mobility issues. The quite-small Gothic church proved to be beautifully maintained inside and outside. Natural light came through the stained-glass windows, illuminating the simple interior, which includes a vaulted ceiling. Many others had gathered inside, crowding the aisles. Outside, I especially liked the white marble statue of Our Lady of Japan at the entrance.

    The admission fee -- 1000 Yen (about $9.41 U.S.) -- also allowed us to visit the museum next door. It offers information on the church and the history of Christianity in Japan. Few details were offered in English and we spent little time there, preferring to move on to other nearby attractions before they closed.

    To reach the church, we took Tram 5 to the Ouratenshudo stop. From there, it was just a short walk.
    Written September 7, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Warner L
    Pasadena, CA668 contributions
    A very nice statue and much thought put into it by the artist but I don't see the dramatic event depict here.
    Written November 21, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • J H
    Guangzhou, China196 contributions
    During the day it's a typical normal arcade, but at night it looks like Osaka, both in a good and a bad way. At night a lot of people come out for dinner, shopping, and drinks. It's very lively, however there's a lot of random men standing around. What are they doing? They were everywhere! Which is why it reminded me of Osaka. Wasn't sure if they were standing about for nefarious reasons, or to take up space. See if you also see them on like every single street corner.
    Written January 4, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Udon_omori
    17 contributions
    Relaxing place to walk with interesting shops around. Good for taking pictures with friends on the stepping stones. Also, try to Spot a heart-shaped stone.
    Written April 1, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • cnltrips
    Greater London, UK158 contributions
    There is a good castella shop on the approach to this church. Other than that, not all too much to see here. To the learned visiter of course there is a lot more to it as this church represents the history of the christians in this area ans as such ; I find it very much worth a visit.
    Written October 4, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • J H
    Guangzhou, China196 contributions
    Lots of steps to climb to really do and see just a little. But temples are like that. You can take a lot of beautiful pictures and enjoy the quietness of the scenery.
    Written January 4, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Shannon Lefebvre
    Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan137 contributions
    The Nagasaki Confucius Shrine is said to be the world's only Confucius Shrine built by Chinese people outside of China. Even today the land on which it stands is Chinese Territory and the land rights controlled by the Chinese Embassy in Tokyo.

    First built in 1893 by Chinese residents of Nagasaki with the support of the Qing Dynasty Government, Nagasaki Confucius Shrine was designed to serve as a place of worship and learning for the Chinese community and housed a Confucian sanctuary and primary school. The buildings were severely damaged by the atomic bomb explosion on August 9, 1945 and was not restored. It was finally opened to the public in September 1967 and was extensively renovated in 1982 and remains the same till the present day.

    It is a joy and exciting process to walk around the beautifully presented gardens and to graze intensely at the architecture and statues. The attention to detail is amazing and one can see that a lot of time and effort was put in to the design and final outcome to look as authentic as possible. One feels like they have stepped out of Japan and back into the realm of China such is the contrast to traditional Japanese buildings and in particular to Japanese Shinto Shrines.

    Well worth a visit even if you are not a fan of Chinese History and artifacts. The Nagasaki Confucius Shrine is located very close to the International Port Terminal so it isn't too far to complete as a walking tour around the area, even if you only have an hour or two to spare it is well worth the effort .
    Written October 4, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Kimitaka S
    Taichung, Taiwan12,458 contributions
    Kofukuji, which belongs to Obaku sect, is a temple with full of Chinese atmosphere. Buildings and gates are painted in red, and that is obviously different from traditional Japanese temples. Although the entrance fee is required, it is worth visiting this place.
    Written September 26, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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