Things to Do in Gansu

Top Gansu Attractions

Things to Do in Gansu

Top Attractions in Gansu

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What travelers are saying

  • Zarza's Travels
    China381 contributions
    Probably one of the most informative attractions I have been to in China. After buying tickets you go and watch 2 films in 2 different cinema rooms, which tell you all about the history and show some amazing close up graphics of the the caves - they give you a headset for English audio. Following this you go on a tour bus and drive about 15 minutes to the caves, where if you have booked a tour (280RMB) they show you around 8 of caves - a random 8 depending on how busy each cave is. Everyone gets to see the biggest indoor buddah. Tour guide was very knowledgeable and was interesting to hear more about the history of them. Leaving the tour area was very busy, again a barage of selfie sticks! A few restaurants and souvenirs shops around, then a bus back to the ticket centre. Great to see though, and amazing history to learn about. No photos allowed inside the caves, I think tourists should respect this and not be slyly using a go pro to take photos as someone else in the group was!
    Written July 16, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Samantha
    11 contributions
    Great collection of fossils and some lovely bronze age horses! There is an entire room dedicated to just pottery from pre-bronze age which was a bit repetitive for me but to each their own! The fossil/dinosaur rooms were great with good mix of English signs. There are entire rooms made up to look like some of the great sights of the silk roads which was different! But fun.
    Entrance was tricky as the tickets are only available through their Chinese only app and they were quite rude about allowing me entrance dispute my various green codes and recent NAT negative result so be warned!
    Written August 6, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • kim buay p
    Singapore, Singapore11,079 contributions
    I did a guided live-stream tour with Jenny's China Tour on Heygo. The location seems to be quite remote. So I was very happy with this live-stream tour especially since travelling is so restricted nowadays. The guide spoke good English and explained how these layered coloured mountains come about. The tour was about 35-40 mins long. We could take wonderful postcard shots of the views.
    Written September 14, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chan Roberts
    Juticalpa, Honduras703 contributions
    This bridge is part of Lanzhou's history as the first bridge across the Yellow River and was originally built in 1907 during the 33rd year of Emperor Guangxu's reign (Qing Dynasty, which came to an end in 1911). The bridge provides easy access to various Lanzhou attractions. At the north end of the bridge is White Pagoda Mountain and access to the park along the north shore of the river. At the south end of the bridge is access to the park along the south shore of the river and not far from other area attractions such as the water wheel and the mother river statue. From the south side of the bridge you can also easily walk to Zhangye Walking Street. The bridge is a popular photo spot for the locals.
    Written May 1, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chan Roberts
    Juticalpa, Honduras703 contributions
    The mountain itself provides a natural barrier for Lanzhou. The pagoda for which the mountain is named sits atop one of the peaks and was originally built during the Yuan Dynasty in memory of a Tibetan Buddhist Lama who died of an illness while traveling to meet with Genghis Khan. The pagoda and surrounding temple complex is considered a holy religious site among locals. NOTE: you should only visit this site if you are in sufficiently good shape to climb all the stairs.
    Written May 2, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ladakhed
    Shanghai, China25 contributions
    This was a great place to go, and was a very different kind of landscape to the Danxia Rainbow mountains, which do not seem to be mentioned on tripadvisor, and May be conflated with these ones. Many people go on a day tour to see both landscape areas, but only do this if you are in a rush.

    Whereas in the rainbow mountains you are in the thick of the beauty, you start here floating above a landscape far below you, and it is mesmerising. There are a range of colours and shapes, mesas, escarpments, towers of stone and jagged layers of rock plummeting down into narrow canyons. Having enjoyed the scenery from above, you descend into one of the canyons through steep sections of steps and ladders, before squeezing through some tight spaces, as well as climbing two vertical 20m ladders to make it up one of the chutes. It sounds scary and strenuous, but antobe with moderate Fitness will find it fine.

    It took a comfortable 3 hours or so to enjoy the view s and do the walk.

    There is a 0945 bus from the west bus station that will do you off at the site at 1100 and pick you up again at 1630. We twiddled our thumbs a bit for an hour, but you could easily extend the walk in the park, or enjoy all the new facilities they are building outside the park. A taxi would cost between 200 and 300 for a return trip, depending on your bargaining skills.

    It was 100rmb per adult to enter, and 30rmb for a return 25 minute bus ride from the gate to the main park itself.

    It was a beautiful area and a fun walk. Definitely worth going.
    Written July 23, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Travelfox
    London, UK101 contributions
    Spectacular tomb ruins from the Wei-Jin period that somehow seem to get little attention. The little museum and preserved brick paintings are stunning. Tomb no. 6 (only one you can visit) show scenes from daily life of the couple in the middle chamber (women on the left, men on the right; in three stages youth - adult - old age). The local gatekeeper can explain many details and the shop outside has souvenirs from the 80s with historic value.
    Written November 3, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • AZCasualTraveler
    Mesa, AZ1,831 contributions
    The Dafo or Buddha Temple of Zhangye is centrally located near city center and the street in front of the entrance to this Temple is lined with beautiful weeping willow trees - very nice to walk here. There are a number of small shops and eateries that are also located on this street at the Temple entrance. Visiting the Buddha temple was a very nice experience - the Temple was well maintained, and there is also a tall, prominent Stupa located in the temple complex as well.
    While in Zhangye, the Dafo or Buddha Temple is a must see place to visit.
    Written December 31, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Gary, Australia
    China72 contributions
    I visited Maijishan Grottos in December 2020 as I wanted to see the area in snow and avoid the huge summer crowds. I have visited hundreds of places in China (an Australian working in Guangzhou) and this is undoubtedly one of my top 3 favourites. I think ‘grottos’ is a more apt name than caves as the openings in the cliff face are quite small. Maijishan is one of the four famous grottos of China, the others being Mogao, Yungang, and Longmen – all in different provinces. One does not have to be a Buddhist, or even spiritual to appreciate the awesomeness, craftsmanship and cultural value of these grottos. The eagle-eyed will see an evolution of styles spanning the dynasties and centuries.
    Visiting Maijishan needs preparation and some of the information I found on websites seems now to be incorrect. I flew from Guangzhou to Lanzhou for a week. I took a taxi from my hotel to Lanzhou West Train Station; then caught the high speed train from Lanzhou West Station at 7.05am and arriving at Tianshui South Station at 8.33am (159RMB for 1st class ticket one way). I walked to the far end of the station and descended two escalators to the bus station in the basement. I waited about 40 minutes and caught BUS 60 to the entrance of the Maijishan site. Bus 60 is a tourist shuttle bus costing 7 RMB each way. I think there are only 2 morning buses in winter but more in other seasons. Once arriving at the site, pay 80RMB to enter, then choose to walk to Maiji Mountain (It took me 20 minutes walking briskly uphill along a road) or take a small electric vehicle (there will be a small charge). Walk up a steep set of stone stairs to the second admission gate. Here you just show your ticket and enter OR pay extra for a private tour in which extra grottos will be open for viewing. I chose not to have a private tour as it was a minimum of 600 RMB per grotto and in winter, there are no English-speaking guides. I caught the 2pm shuttle bus back to the station, and then the 4.05pm high speed train to Lanzhou. By 6.30pm I was sipping craft beers near the Zhengning Night Market and editing my photos.
    I was totally amazed at the technology of the ‘out-of-cliff walkways’ (totally safe I think), the view of the valleys and mountains, and of course the hundreds of Buddha-clad grottos. Most of the grottos are protected by metal gauze; however, I placed my iPhone camera in a gap and took oodles of great photos. I also had a downloaded guide of the grottos and read this beforehand. There are a few larger, gauzeless grottos open all the time, and these had amazing sculptures and murals depicting a thousand years of evolving Buddhist history. I won’t provide any details of the sculptures as I think these need to be discovered.
    A few tips if travelling privately from Lanzhou:
    # Best to use the high speed train – forget slow trains and buses as these leave little time to explore the mountain; remember to use the special entry and exit channel by showing your passport and train ticket
    # have the correct names of the high speed stations in Chinese characters for the taxi drivers etc
    # book the high speed train tickets in advance – use a Chinese travel agency or a Chinese friend who can book and pay online
    # bring your passport, and your mobile phone with the latest Health Record for the province (if travelling in 2021)
    # bring water and snacks, comfortable walking shoes to negotiate the stairs and walkways, and appropriate clothes for the season
    # don’t whinge if many of the grottos are protected by gauze as cultural heritage is more important than photo addictions; there are c. 200 grottos and 7000 sculptures – you do not need to see them all!
    # take it slow and easy on the steep stairs and on the overhang walkways; be conscious of people around you in tight spaces
    # avoid Chinese national holidays at all cost
    Written December 30, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Stephen C
    1,075 contributions
    Despite the fact that most part of the wall is reconstructed rather than the original.

    If you only want to see the real thing then you can give this place a miss. Else, it is still worth visiting as it sits on the original site and is rich in history. Apparently, this wall is considered to be the start of the Great Wall and is located along the Silk Road.
    Written October 11, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • C B
    Europe71 contributions
    We really enjoyed the striking views of the sand dunes. The entrance fee is 100 RM, but the ticket is actually good for three days, so you can come back at sunset and sunrise if you want. Once you are inside, you have an option to take a bus to the base of a dune for a small fee, or to take a camel ride, or rent an ATV. We choose none of the above and simply walked. slightly off the main bath was a path thru some greenery which was much cooler. On the main dune they have set wires in the sand to give you a little traction going up. There are plenty of concessions within the park and you can wander about as much as you want. According to the signage their is no worries about erosion of the dune because so much sand gets blown up every day.
    Written July 14, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • BobbyGentry
    Nanjing, China484 contributions
    A truly great place to visit. Tickets available across from the Norden Café.

    Brief take-away from our yellow sect monk guide སྟོང་ཉིད། tongnyi东尼

    Light of knowledge removes darkness of ignorance

    We each have 6 souls
    6 elements (with a little help from Wikipedia)
    sky (green (peace/jealousy))
    earth (yellow/orange (beauty/pride))
    air (blue (awakening/anger))
    fire (red (compassion/attachment))
    water (white (being/Ignorance - centre))
    space (black (awakening/death))

    Our consciousness stems from our 5 senses plus the central soul

    Labrang monastery, Yellow Hat sect, Gelugpa order, Tibetan Buddhism, founded in 1709.

    We spent three days in Labrang. Staying at the magnificent Shangu Guesthouse, located across from the White Stupa. We walked the inner (monastery) and outer (mountainous) kora.
    Written July 14, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Stephen C
    1,075 contributions
    Even though this place is predominantly reconstructed, I enjoyed the visit because it gave me a perspective of what the ancient city and the fortified walls look like. In fact, if I were to draw a parallel, the place is like a combination of the ancient city wall in Xi’an and a small section of the Great Wall of China located in Beijing.

    We enjoyed walking on top of the fortified walls. The views are nice, if not for the industrial towers that spoil the otherwise picturesque background.

    And if you missed the chance to ride on a camel at Mingsha Mountain, you will find then at the entrance of this attraction.
    Written October 11, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Maurice Stanley B
    Burnaby20 contributions
    It was a terrific experience visiting the night market in Lanzhou. Amazing variety of foods and so much great atmosphere. A really excellent experience on a weekend summer night....Open late.
    Written August 6, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • AZCasualTraveler
    Mesa, AZ1,831 contributions
    The Taolai River Beacon Tower is considered to be the first beacon tower of the Great Wall and is located in an area in far western China. At this historical site, there is a modern Visitor Center that overlooks the Taolai River from a cliff viewpoint. The entrance to this Visitor Center/Museum is quite interesting in that it is located on a pathway to the underground Museum structure. The Museum is small but still interesting with the nicest point of interest being the outdoor viewing platform at one end of the museum building. From this viewing platform, there is a stunning view of the Taolai River as it bends around a deep canyon. We came in late October, and snow can still be seen on the mountains beyond the river - nice view!

    To get to the actual first beacon tower structure, you had to take a shuttle bus from the visitor center and travel a seemingly long road to get there. The tower structure itself is not much to see (as can be seen in the photos) because it is quite worn-down from the weather elements - the same goes for the "Great Wall" section that runs adjacent to the beacon tower. Never the less, these structures are still significant in that it is located on the western-most area of China and is still considered to be part of the Great Wall which stretches far to the east. In my opinion, it is still worthwhile to visit these historical structures which is in contrast to the Great Wall sections to the East.
    Written January 14, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.