Things to Do in Aleppo

Things to Do in Aleppo, Syria - Aleppo Attractions

Things to Do in Aleppo

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  • smithy69uk
    London, UK190 contributions
    Visited last week whilst in Aleppo

    Citadel closed Tuesdays, but great experience when we returned following day

    Amazing views of Aleppo, really is some structure

    Staff around the site were friendly and forthcoming in extra information about the site

    It’s a must in aleppo
    Written November 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mathias S
    333 contributions
    While the monasticism started in Egypt, Syria was an early follower. St Simon the Elder's (late 4th-first half of 5th century) innovation was that he stood on a pillar for many years. He attracted much attention. Pilgrims would gather under the pillar and ask him for a benediction, so Theodoret of Cyrrhus compared it to a lighthouse attracting ships from far away. People would sell minatures of the pillar of St Simon even in far-away places of the Roman Empire.

    After his death, his pillar was surrounded by a great cross-shaped building, including a church and 3 houses for the pilgrims. It was allegedly the biggest religious building of its time. Monks would live nearby too.

    The monastery was destroyed at least twice in 11th century, during the fights between Byzantium and the Muslims of Aleppo. The monks were slaughtered and I'm not sure if it recovered after it.

    In any case, the place was later on used as a citadel, hence its current name.

    The decorations are quite nice. I was most impressed by the capitels of the pillars which are like leaves moved by a wind.

    It is located on the border with Turkey, and to get there from Aleppo is not completely easy, but managable.

    On the way from Antioch to this place there's, still in Syria, the church in "Qalb Lozeh", ruined, but still nice.

    There used to be another stylite, St Simon the Younger, and his place is located in Turkey already.
    Written April 13, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mathias S
    333 contributions
    Aleppo was an important city from very early days, and a capital of several Muslim states since half of 10th century.

    The Old Town is worth a visit mostly for the citadel with the magnificent Mamluk-era gate.
    The Umayyad Mosque is quite nice, although it lost its original mosaic decoration when it was burnt by the Byzantines, and the 11-th century minaret collapsed during the recent civil war.
    The bazaar (souq) is very nice, with covered narrow lanes and a lot to buy: materials, clothes, but mostly the famous natural soap of Aleppo. Interestingly, the spices' sellers sometimes form the spices inside glass in different patterns, like, for example, the flag of Lebanon etc. There are good goldsmiths all around the city, often Armenians. I value my silver cross from there, just like my wooden boxes covered in pearl mass. Sadly, the bazaar was damaged during the civil war.
    The city walls are extant on in many places, with some nice gates remaining. But not everywhere.
    There are some old churches and mosques, but most of them are not very interesting.
    Written April 13, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mathias S
    333 contributions
    There are several "dead cities" in Syria, and this one is arguably the nicest of them.
    These are late antiquity cities, abandoned probably due to Persian or Arab conquests of Syria in early 7th century.

    The city consists of buildings in light-greyish stone:
    - tombs
    - houses
    - churches

    While there was a young guy collecting a fee (unwilling to accept my reduction), no-one really checks what are you doing there.
    Therefore, we used to climb the churches and houses or the figues that grew inside the houses, and have fights inside the houses with the figue fruit. It was great fun, although probably it's not what one should do there.

    It's hard to get there, one has to take some private transport (hotels in Hama offer that).

    I was there twice.
    Written April 13, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mathias S
    333 contributions
    While I enjoyed some particularities in Aleppo (like kind of closed melted cheese fata'irs that were not present in Damascus), the city of Aleppo is mildly disappointing.

    The citadel is superb, but mostly the history of it and the gate. The inside or the view are mediocre.

    The mosques, apart from the Great Mosque, are not so impressive.

    The city has more Christians than Damascus (especially Armenians who fled from Turkey after 1915), and the churches are bigger. The Greek-Catholic church for example is quite big. But not very interesting. Even if, in my times, Aleppo was "the capital of Muslim culture", the image of the Armenian church was visible on the official posters promoting it.

    There are good goldsmiths and artisants in Aleppo.

    The biggest building in the city is the new town hall, which is sometimes illuminated at night in various colours or, for example, the portrait of the previous president.
    Written April 13, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • THOMASFROMDAMASCUS
    Damascus, Syria3,516 contributions
    The Aleppo Omayyad Mosque also called the Great Mosque of Aleppo was virtually destroyed during the Syrian Civil War and now they are expeditiously restoring it to its previous grandeur and spender.
    The Mosque was built in 715 where in the minaret was added in the 11th century. The minaret is square and only a single structure, both are somewhat unusual in Arabic construction in those days and the minaret was connected to the adjoining souq.
    Early in the Syrian Civil War the mosque and its’ only minaret were destroyed as fighting was taking place in the surrounding and massive Aleppo Souq. Some people say that the minaret was used by snipers as it was quite tall and offered a great view over the old city of Aleppo, therefor it was practically destroyed.
    We had a special tour of the reconstruction taking place in the mosque and on the minaret and it is taking a great deal of time, but you can visualize what it will look like in a few more years.
    It is being restored in a painstaking process as they want to use each of the original stones used in the original minaret. The Chief Reconstruction Engineer of the entire mosque project told us that each stone that lay in the rubble of the destroyed minaret were numbered and then by use of a three-dimensional computer its’ original location was identified. It appears that the minaret was about sixty to seventy percent completed.
    The interior of the main mosque is also under renovation and is coming along very well. The majority of the wood-works and interior plastering have been completed.
    So we are hoping that during our next visit to Aleppo we will see some further completion of this very important reconstruction of this famous Aleppo Omayyad Mosque.
    Written October 3, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • tinky_in_arabia
    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia97 contributions
    I just wonder how this place is now. During my visit, this was one on of most vibrant and unforgettable locales of Aleppo, bustling with traffic and people going about their daily errands. Lots of local shops around the square, the olive stalls with those colorful varieties are wonderful.
    Written November 27, 2014
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mathias S
    333 contributions
    These villages, called mostly Dead Cities, were deserted in the early 7th century.
    Sergilla has a separate entry. It is the nicest of them, with many churches, houses, tombs.
    Al-Bara is another one. It has a massive tomb or two. Not like the puny ones in Sergilla (which were just sarcophagi), but an actual, big one. There are also a couple of churches there, nicely preserved. The city of Al-Bara is mostly known as being captured by the first crusade, who installed a bishop there.
    There are other monuments in these vicinities, but mostly just ancient houses.
    To get there, you have to organise your transport yourself - or by a hotel in Hama.
    There is also a church is Qalb Lozeh and the St Simon's Citadel west from Aleppo, as well as ruins of ancient palace in Qasr Ibn Wardan.
    Written April 13, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ArzivHajinian
    Yerevan, Armenia35 contributions
    place 2 waist ur time & rilax with small waterfalls.....
    its include many different restaurants & cusines,
    its special 4 runing & walking sport
    Written August 18, 2012
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • aylinyrd
    Istanbul, Türkiye10 contributions
    The only problem is that they didn't have any informative signs or labels in English at the time of my visit
    Written March 21, 2012
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Dana
    Damascus, Syria22 contributions
    Ebla, also spelled Tell Mardikh, ancient city 33 miles (53 km) southwest of Aleppo in northwest Syria. During the height of its power (2600-2240 BC), Ebla controlled northern Syria, Lebanon, and parts of northern Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) and enjoyed trade and diplomatic relations with countries as far away as Egypt, Iran, and Sumer.

    The excavation of the mound (the hill) now known as the site of Ebla began in 1964 with a team of archaeologists from the University of Rome led by Paolo Mattai. In 1975, Matai's team found the archives of Ebla, dating back to the third millennium BC. More than 17,000 cuneiform tablets and clay fragments have been discovered
    Written July 25, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ImadHaidar
    Aleppo, Syria7 contributions
    An old, almost 100 years old privately owned in Azizye neighborhood in Aleppo-Syria
    basement of the building used to have tunnels connecting with old tunnels of old Aleppo.
    Written December 20, 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • THOMASFROMDAMASCUS
    Damascus, Syria3,516 contributions
    One of the most favorite tourist attractions in the Old City of Aleppo has always been the Aleppo Souqs.
    During Syria’s Civil War the Aleppo Souqs sustained the most intensive destruction of any area within the city of Aleppo.
    The souqs were built around the XXX century and was quite large. They contained many shops; mosques; hammams (Bath Houses} and old Caravansaries.
    We had a special tour of the reconstruction taking place in all the Aleppo Souq area by the Syrian Minister of Tourism and with the Chief Reconstruction Engineer. So we had a chance to walk through the many souqs which compose the true Aleppo Souq Area.
    We were all astonished by the amount and speed of the reconstruction taking place within the majority of the numerous souqs.
    It was also a pleasant surprise that many of the old Bab’s {doors} between the different souqs were still intact and were reattached in their original positions.
    While visiting Aleppo you must look at this new and more beautiful rebuilt Aleppo Souq.
    Written October 4, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • 299saif
    Amman, Jordan49 contributions
    It was after a long day walking in Aleppo from the castle to the old souq it really came on time after late light lunch,its very nice and the staff were professional and friendly.
    Written March 26, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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