Ancient Ruins in Japan

Ancient Ruins in Japan, Asia

Japan Ancient Ruins

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What travelers are saying

  • ScambusterSZ
    Sydney, Australia1,836 contributions
    This site is only 15minutes drive from the Railway/ downtown.

    The museum is very well done and then you walk to the ‘village’ huts etc outside in about 5-10 minutes.

    It’s also very close to the Modern Art Museum so you knock over both but allow 3-4 hours to do both.
    Written March 30, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Blake P
    Baton Rouge32 contributions
    Visiting this school is nice, because it is different from the typical shrines and temples that one normally visits in the area. The layout and history associated with the school is interesting and it is a very relaxing place to visit (Visited 2007)
    Written March 22, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Tokugawa_Ieyasu
    Fujieda, Japan103 contributions
    Those who know about Japanese history things may understand that many of the castles were built as bases for battle. The Yamanaka Castle was also built for the sake of defending Odawara castle where was the headquarters of Hojo Clan. It is located at the mountain area of Tokaido which was the main path to Sagami area.
    When Toyotomi Clan tried to concquer Hojo Clan, Yamanaka castle was the critical base, however, Hojo army could not endure even a day.
    As it was the first time for me to visit there, the whole site was very huge and was more than my expectation.
    You should prepare sneekers and backpacks because walking around in this ruins is just like hiking. Brief visit takes 1 hour, and if you want to see details you need more than 2 hours.
    This ruins of Yamanaka Castle is one of the most impressive mountain castles I've ever visited.
    Just imagine the battles were taken place there when you visit.
    Written December 11, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ShibaInuGuide
    6,032 contributions
    Partial archaeological excavations have found that Inariyama Tumulus belongs to an important lord or owake who served Wakatakeru no Ookimi. Wakatakeru inscribed in the iron sword buried in the tumulus is also known as Emperor Yuryaku (21st Emperor according to the official genealogy), who was recorded also by the Chinese in the Book of Song as 倭王武 and one of the Five Kings of Japan (Yamato, Wa). The sword is kept at the archaeological museum also located in the complex.

    Maruhakayama Tumulus is the largest circular mound in Japan and was used as an encampment by the Toyotomi forces led by Ishida Mitsunari in his grand seige of Oshi Castle against the Hojo-aligned forces in 1590. Parts of the impressively long embankment that Ishida Mitsunari constructed upon orders from Toyotomi Hideyoshi in a failed attempt to flood Oshi Castle remain.

    All that is now history. The area is particularly beautiful in early April with cherry blossom. People interested in the history of Japan would love this place.
    Written July 20, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • TravelNutKase
    Reno, NV121 contributions
    I'm pretty sure it's the highest point on the island. Excellent view! Could have stayed all day drinking in the sights.
    Written November 25, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Ken-from-Tokyo
    18 contributions
    This place is an air-raid shelter of the Tateyama Naval Air Force of WWII. You can see only a part of the 1.6km tunnell which is relatively large compared with other tunnels in Japan. It is estimated that some of the rooms were used for telegraph commincation and medical treatments. When you go to the Tateyama Castle, it is worthwhile visiting here as well as it is only a couple of minutes by car and they sell you a tour ticket.
    Written November 22, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Grace
    Kimotsuki-cho, Japan16 contributions
    Came with a friend to picnic and swim in the river. Great place for kids to play or adults to relax! The walk to the shrine area was very peaceful, it reminded me of Ise Jingu in Mie prefecture.
    Written November 15, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Caleb M
    15 contributions
    Spectacular view of the southernmost tip of the island. Decent surf spot at the bottom of the cliffs. Bring reef shoes if you want to go out on the reef.
    Written November 12, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • seven39
    Osaka, Japan272 contributions
    The interesting with Imashirozuka Ancient Tomb is that it is possible to go inside. All other imperial tombs are controlled by the imperial household and only the emperor is allowed to enter. In case of Imashirozuk Ancient Tomb it was originally not understood that it was the Tomb of emperor Keitai. Another tomb was identified as his tomb and there under the control of imperial household.
    Besides the tomb, there is a very interesting museum.
    Written December 29, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Guzheng_KL
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia60 contributions
    It is a good place to visit if you have interest for history or archeology. You can take Chiba Monorail from JR Chiba station then get off at Sakuragi or Oguradai, station. You need to walk for 15 minutes to reach Kasori shell mounds. It is easier to drive if you have any car navigation.
    Written April 20, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sia65
    Singapore, Singapore613 contributions
    This site in Sakai used to have more than 100 burial mounds (kofun in Japanese). Now there are 46 left. The biggest being the keyhole-shaped Nintoku-Tenno-Ryo Kofun.

    Although you can’t see the shape from ground level when you visit the site, you can still get an appreciation of how big the kofun is. There are smaller kofun around the park which you can see how a kofun is like with its moat and mound. Amazing to see such historic features from the past.

    You can also rent bicycles from the Daisen Park Tourist Information Center (opens daily 9am-4.30pm except on New Year Day). They also have maps and info pamphlets available. I visited on a Sunday and there were friendly volunteer guides at the Prayer Gate of the Nintoku-Tenno-Ryo Kofun (just in front of the info centre) who can speak English.

    If you arrive before 9am, there is a cafe next to the info centre which serves coffee and breakfast. There’s also a bicycle museum nearby (¥200 entrance fee for adults) which is also interesting; just follow the directional signs to it.
    Written July 22, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Andrew1234
    Doylestown, PA564 contributions
    The Oyu Stone Circles are interesting Jomon-era artifacts. People with an interest in prehistoric Japan will enjoy visiting them. The grounds are well maintained, and modern-built thatched roof huts help one to visualize how the settlement might have looked back in its day. The stone circles at Oyu are just one of many neat Jomon-era sites spread across northern Tohoku.
    Written June 7, 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Masayoshi
    Fujisawa, Japan3,949 contributions
    Got known the mysterious stories about the Bronze swords and the Bell-shaped Vessels at the Shimane Museum of Ancient Izumo.
    Those bronze swords and vessels are found in the ground here.
    Why they are in the ground?
    Why so many?
    Why so organised?

    It's a good experience to see the actual site.

    Now, the site is a part of a park for locals.
    Written August 18, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Zimminaroundtheworld
    Okinawa Prefecture, Japan1,812 contributions
    The smelter ruins are about halfway between town and the silver mine entrance. I do recommend making a stop here as the ruins were interesting and the area was beautiful. The day I went it was misty out, with the ruins, and green vegetation it reminded me of ruins I've seen in Central America. These ruins are completely different, but still. There is a small path on the side that allows you to walk up the ruins. Very interesting area, highly recommend stopping here.
    Written October 30, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Keith S
    Perth, Australia8 contributions
    We went to this park not knowing what to expect, and were amazed at what we found. The park covers an area where people have lived continuously for thousands of years, what makes it special is the pesence of hundreds of "Tumuli", which are burial mounds covering various types of tomb, most notably from the fifth to seventh centuries AD.
    There is a museum in the building near the entrance, its 190 yen entry fee, you can go to the park and skip the museun if you like. We very nearly did - by accident - however a lady from the museum spied us and showed us the entrance to the museum, which we are grateful for. The museum has artifacts from the late stone age through to relatively recent, with a lot of material from the fifth to seventh centuries, mostly pottery, but also weapons. The museum is split into sections covering various time periods, with detailed explanations for each period in Japanese and English. Some of the English explanations have lost something in the translation process, but you can certainly get a feel for the history of the area.
    The park itself is a popular spot for picnics, we saw many Japanese families with young children, and many dogs. The park is one side of a range of hills, one edge is at the bottom on the flat, the hills are steep with many spurs, steep gullies and complex features, which is typical for Japan. There is a trail leading up the side of the hills, it zig zags past various tumuli and follows the ridge to a local high point, where the biggest tumuli is located - nearly 80 m in length.
    When you walk along the track you notice that there are many mounds, usually 2-4 m high and 5-10 m long, located mostly on spurs. At first I thought these were natural features, but then the penny dropped and I realised that each mound is man-made, and covers a tomb of some sort. A couple of the burial chambers are open for inspection and have a light, you can walk into the tomb and look out.
    We were there when the cherry trees were in bloom, which was spectacular.
    Access to the park is either by bus, which will drop you at the entrance, or by train, which requires a walk of perhaps 1 km from the nearest station. You can also walk (we did) from Wakayama, it is about 4.5 km from Wakayama train station.
    If you are in Wakayama and have any interest in Japanese history be sure to visit this park/museum.
    Written April 12, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.