Museums in Tashkent

Top Museums in Tashkent, Uzbekistan

Museums in Tashkent

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  • Paradorn R
    Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan18 contributions
    Excellent museum set in a very beautiful and charming house of a Tsarist Russian diplomat. The exhibitions were small but very interesting and attractive. The museum shop is also a great place to shop for antiques and contemporary souvenirs. Friendly staff as well.
    Written April 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Marius
    Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates50 contributions
    Great place to visit to experience a trip to the past. Lots of history embedded in the museum. Rad up on Amir Timur and his ventures to get the most out of the visit.
    Written September 6, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Berry_in_Blue
    SLovakia35 contributions
    Comparing to other museums in Tashkent it is actually pretty good. As it is quite common in Uzbekistan there is very little in terms of explanations, brochures, or guide (in English) or shops. However, I think the coverage of ancient times is very good. There are several items on display and even if there are not many one can get of view of the history of Uzbekistan.
    I visited only the first floor as I was not interested in the modern times, therefore I cannot comment on that one.
    As in the previous cases it was possible to use the NazzAR app, which provided explanation to some exhibits.
    Written May 11, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • MoonaMuslim
    728 contributions
    The monument with the small park around is well-kept and looks beautiful. The museum is small but nice, with 2 turquoise blue domes.
    The memorial and the museum "In Memory of the Victims of Repression" applies to the years under Soviet reign until Uzbekistan became independent. Mainly the time under the Bolsheviks, from 1917, and under Stalin. Authoritarian power through politics, the police, the public prosecutor's office and the judiciary - not only towards individuals.
    The place is nice and tells of history and the understanding of suffering under Soviet reign. Historically relevant, tragic and sad.

    Definitely a must if you want to get to know the history of Uzbekistan. Also nice for a cozy little walk there, really a nice monument and little park around.

    The monument can be viewed in combination with the city tour by bus. There is a short stop of around 15 minutes. Or else, if you want to visit the museum, you can take the bus or the metro (Shahristan St). I prefer the taxi.
    Written June 5, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • alan oestreich
    4 contributions
    This is quite a collection of trains through the years in excellent conditions. Would help to have an Uzbeki speaking guide.
    Written January 26, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Berry_in_Blue
    SLovakia35 contributions
    It is a really big museum, but again there are not many items, which cover the cultures living in the present day Uzbekistan. For example, only if four floors is dedicated to those. I am aware that Uzbekistan was exposed a lot to other cultures, but the problem is that seeing paintings of Russian or European rules and nobles without a proper explanation does not help to understand why they are there. This goes as well for Japanese and Korean artefacts. Additionally, several of the paintings present are only copies, with originals around the world l. I was surprised to see some paintings there only to realise later that it is but a copy. I first assumed they were rented to the museum. This is because there is very little explanation l. It is also not possible to take photos of one does not pay and as always there are no guides or maps available. Additionally, it is not possible to use the NazzAR app in the museum.
    Written May 11, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Helmut S
    Bangkok, Thailand1,638 contributions
    The Art Gallery is housed in an impressive building; inside there are 2 floors with a central circular space around an atrium. Two stairs lead up to the upper floor, a big chandelier hangs from the ceiling. The gallery is very spacious and well arranged, the paintings are presented with explanations in Uzbek, Russian and English. The majority of work is from 1909 to present day.

    When I was there the paintings of the artist Alexander Tyurin from Tashkent shown at an exhibition which ended on 5 January 2020 were still presented in 5 rooms on the 2nd floor.

    The works by local artists range from realism, impressionism, expressionism, abstract, photorealism. It took my about 1 hour to see all exhibits.

    Entrance was 25 Soms (about 2.5 Euro/2.8 $), another 10 Soms are due for taking photos, guides were at hand but none spoke English. There is a checkroom to leave the coat, hat, etc. free of charge. I was the only visitor on a Saturday afternoon and when I left they closed the gallery at 16.30 (officially it should be 17.30), Sundays the gallery is closed.
    Written January 25, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • M.
    Warsaw, Poland283 contributions
    There is not museum in fact but private house with very friendly hosts.

    You can find there all sizes of painted pumpkins. Different patterns and paintings.

    You can wear traditional, Uzbek clothes, dance and sing with hosts which are playing Uzbek "guitar" and presenting "puppet theatre".

    These people are fantastic. It's more for kids than for adults - but everybody will find something interesting.

    My bad luck that I didn't think that I could buy such a pumpkin there as souvenir.

    However we thanked in cash and went to visit Tashkent.
    Written August 27, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Waheed Ahmad Shah
    Multan, Pakistan12 contributions
    Any one who has some interest in electronic gadgets should visit it as soon as possible. very impressive collection of vintage radios, gramophones,televisions, telex and calculators. It was free for every one. English speaking guide was not available at them time when i visit so they handed me a tablet having all information about the exhibits in English. Staff was unbelievably polite and cooperative. you can spend more than one hour easily here with out getting bored. Taxi drivers do not know about this museum so better you show them the address on map.
    Written January 23, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Pravine C
    Gurugram (Gurgaon), India813 contributions
    One interesting place that we visited while in Tashkent was the Muyi Mubarak Library. This is probably the most important building in the Hazrati Imam complex . This building houses the world famous Quran of Caliph Uthman – Ottoman dating back to the 6th century. It was completed in the year 651, only 19 years after the death of Muhammad.
    The priceless Quran is kept in a special glass vault built into the wall. Only about one third of the original survives – about 250 pages of parchment sheets of a very large size.
    Besides the Quran, the library has a relic which is believed to be a single strand of hair of the Prophet Muhammad.
    The library has approximately 20,000 books and 3000 manuscripts. These deal with medieval history, astronomy and medicine.
    No photography is allowed inside the building.
    Written September 4, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Craig S
    Washington DC, DC1 contribution
    I had some time to kill between meetings at the Hyatt so took a 4-hour walk around Tashkent. Passed the Autograph on the way back and decided to take a look inside. I was pleasantly surprised by the quality and range of art and handicrafts from Uzbekistan for sale. Excellent handwoven Uzbek fabrics and pillowcases, ceramics, jewelry, beautiful paintings, woodcarvings, even clothes for sale - all in one easy to navigate place, all nicely arranged. Slightly more expensive than some other shops and markets around town but the Autograph was definitely a much relaxing more shopping experience. Excellent service and wrapping of things for the flight home. Highly recommended.
    Written February 29, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • sunderpk
    Sharjah, United Arab Emirates47 contributions
    I did not expect this place to be quite well developed and with all the facilities. except for car parking facilities, it has a professional touch.
    Written May 25, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Andrew M
    7,160 contributions
    The Defence Museum is located north east of town in Jasorat Park, Mirzo Ugulbek district. We visited this area by taking the subway on the red line to the last stop at Buyuk Ipak Yo'li station. A walk of 1 km is required north on Mirzo Ugulbek Avenue to reach the museum. The park has a fountain and is well maintained. In front of the museum is the Oath to the Motherland Memorial. It is in two sections. The first shows a sculpture of a soldier kneeling with hat in his left hand and holding the Uzbek flag in his right. He is in the act of kissing the flag.

    The second section of the monument, is a white brick wall immediately behind the soldier. The sculpture of a mother, wearing a scarf, and with hands raised in front of her as if pleading or asking a question. This mother represents the love of the Uzbek nation for the soldier. The artist is Jaloliddin Mirtojiev, and the sculpture was installed in 2010 to celebrate 20 years of independence. This statue replaced a Soviet statue known as "defender of the motherland". This area was a former Soviet park which had military equipment, a playground and other family activities.

    The military museum was constructed in 1975. It includes exhibits on Uzbek military history from ancient times to modern. The museum is on two floors and tickets cost 15,000 som, and photos were free. The self guided tour begins on the second floor, which has exhibits from earlier periods to WW2 . The exhibits should be viewed in an anti clockwise direction. The first exhibits relate to weapons used by the Persian and Macedonian armies between 600-300 BC. These included spears, swords and slings with stones. Drawings and paintings on the wall assisted in explaining the exhibits.

    Maps on the walls showed the history of Transoxia and the Sassanid Empire which gave a better appreciation of the Empires through the ages. There was a great painting of Jalal al Adin, of the Khawerzm Empire, who was famous for resisting the Mongols after they captured all the major cities of Uzbekistan in 1220. The map of the mongol invasion was also very good. Predictably, a section exists on the local hero, Amir Timur. This was probably the most detailed area of the museum, as it included weapons, war drums and his flag. There was a replica wooden throne in this section, which we assumed was Timur's.

    Next to the Timur section were exhibits on his grandson, Babur, who created the Mughal Empire. We enjoyed the "fortification" section, as we had walked the forts and city walls in Khiva and Bukhara. A section on gifts to the Bukhara emir (19th century) had beautiful sculptures. The Soviet period of 1917-90 had great displays, including red army uniforms. We enjoyed the model tank displays. There was a bust of the local hero, Sabir Rakhimov. Modern displays were on the first floor including the Afghan war.

    We spent 90 minutes here and were very satisfied with the quality of the exhibits. A sculpture of Mirzo Ulugbek is a 10 minute walk east to Durmon Road.
    Written October 28, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • JGDynamo
    Canada2,158 contributions
    The Tashkent Planetarium offers interactive movies that you can watch in different languages, make sure if you don’t speak Russian that you get the English showing or you could be really lost on what is happening. It is a good spot to spend an hour or two and surprisingly (or maybe not surprisingly) modern.
    Written July 1, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Andrew M
    7,160 contributions
    This museum is easily reached by taking bus 18, 33, 38, 57 or 58 along Usman Nasir Street and getting off at the Yakkasaray Street bus stop, which is a lime green colour. After getting off the bus, turn right on Yakkasaray Street, and walk north for five minutes (300 meters), and the museum will be seen on your right. There is no sign above the museum, but a small white poster with Japanese script is on the grey column at the entrance. There is a perimeter iron fence at the museum which is black with gold topped tips. Number 20 is on a white door to the left of the museum but the main entrance is to the right (at # 18) through brown double doors with a balcony above.

    After entering you will be in the lobby of what seems a house with a well tended garden in the courtyard beyond. The museum is up the stairs to your left. The exhibits are in two rooms and mainly describe the construction work done by the POW's and the nearby grave site. The first displays were dedicated to the graves, and a shovel shaped grave marker is in this section. Other photos here show the development of the Japanese section of the cemetery and the installation of monuments. All the display areas have Uzbek and Japanese explanations on white cards.

    There was a wooden model of the "May peace prevail on earth" post which is in the cemetery, and near to it was a display made from paper cranes. Next were photos of the Japanese Prime Minister and his delegation who visited the museum and cemetery. Items which the Japanese POW's made for locals were also on display, these included a wooden crib. The most interesting exhibit for us, was the map which showed the route which the Japanese took between Central Asia and Japan. We had traveled most of the areas on the route, so were very familiar. Also in this area was an example of the work clothes worn by the Japanese POW's.

    This museum was opened from the house of Jalil Sultanov in 1998. This was six years after information on the POW's was declassified by Soviet authorities. He eventually had to expand the display area by purchasing the house next door. With the aid of Japan, the cemetery where the graves had been protected by locals, was restored in 1990, and all 13 Japanese POW cemeteries in Uzbekistan had been restored by 2002. The POW's had worked in many regions of Uzbekistan including Tashkent, Angren, Bekabad, Kokand, and Kogan. It is estimated that 817 POW's died out of the over 20,000 who were working in Uzbekistan between 1945-1950.

    The Japanese POW's constructed buildings, dams, roads, etc. Examples of their activities in Tashkent include, the Alisher Navoi Opera theatre, barracks (which are still used as houses today), Mukini Theater, textile factory, Central Telegraph and the Ministry of Culture. After visiting the museum, walk across to the Fozil-Ota cemetery to view the POW graves of Japan and German soldiers. Other Japanese related attractions in town include the International Caravanserai and the Japanese Garden.
    Written October 29, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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