Athens Ancient Ruins

Ancient Ruins in Athens, Greece

Athens Ancient Ruins

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What travelers are saying

  • Feverboy73
    Romford, UK480 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Well worth the visit despite the exceptionally hot weather! We booked the 9am slot and couldn’t believe how busy/crowded it was. Lots of huge groups of tour guides walking around which did make it difficult to navigate but was well worth it.
    Written June 16, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Baggio1018
    London, UK273 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Pretty much THE sight in the Acropolis - the temple of Athena, the theatres are all impressive but there was no out-doing the Parthenon.
    Unluckily for us, there were works on-going, compounded with how busy the area was, this limited how much we could take in.

    Regardless though, a must see. As with the rest of the Acropolis, need to get there early.
    We regret not reversing our route, we should have entered the Acropolis and tried to come here first.
    Written May 18, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • linda_zera
    Riga, Latvia5 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Great place if you like history and are fascinated by ancient things. Temple is well preserved and is better than Acropolis, as you will most likely get few good pictures without people on them. Museum is small, but cool, as there are a lot of vases and ancient tools. For kids it might be boring to be honest, so maybe go with adults 😉
    Written June 16, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sofia
    Athens, Greece89 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is hands down my favorite spot in Athens! It's packed with fascinating history and it's way quieter than other busy sites. When you visit the Agora, don't miss the Temple of Hephaestus and the museum in the Stoa of Attalos (the large portico building, you can't miss it). Do yourself a favor and bring a guidebook or something to help you get the most out of it. You'll really appreciate this amazing place more when you understand what you're seeing.
    Written June 12, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Baggio1018
    London, UK273 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Surprisingly, this was the one sight that was less busy in the whole Acropolis area, maybe because it is right next to the Parthenon and away from the stairs, which is where the tour groups were all concentrated.
    What this meant was, you could have a moment to take a proper look and take things in, god forbid even take a photo or two!
    Written May 18, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Baggio1018
    London, UK273 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Much smaller in comparison to the Parthenon but still significant and worth battling through the tour groups to see.
    However, as with all sights at the top of the Acropolis, good luck with getting that moment and space to take a good look and even a photo!

    Same rules, get there early, go off season etc.
    Written May 18, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Kyle_SD_308
    Rapid City, South Dakota, United States401 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Enjoyable visit with interesting ruins. The site is large and not as crowded as many of the other sites. Entry was part of the package pass we did for the Acropolis and it wasn’t far away.
    Written May 11, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Baggio1018
    London, UK273 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    We almost missed this theatre, having wondered along another main path to avoid some tour groups. Included in the Acropolis ticket and definitely worth stopping by due to the historical significance.
    Written May 18, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • browncondo2102
    Kitchener, Canada1,723 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Roman Agora was built close to the original agora in about 10 BC. Great excavation has been done to bring it almost back to life.
    Written June 6, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Richard M
    Hampstead Norreys, UK891 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The original cemetary for the Greeks of Athens has a number of impressive tombs. The place has an atmosphere as the original location the ancient greek burials. The otehr half of the site is a large area of archeology showing the buildings of the ceramic producers that set up shop here. Lovely.
    Written November 26, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mairwen1
    United Kingdom10,825 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This ancient and imposing marble monument, stands 4 metres high and was erected in 334BC. It looks oddly out of place, sitting along the roadside. We walked past it on our way to the Acropolis and almost overlooked it because of its incongruous position.
    Lysikrates had the monument built to celebrate a prize-winning play that he’d sponsored. Clearly he was not one to be humble in victory.
    However, theatrical and musical performances were costly business and relied upon generous benefactors like Lysikrates to foot the bill for costumes, masks, construction of sets and scenery and so on. Lysikrates was not alone and it was common for wealthy Athenians to act as patrons of the theatre and arts.
    The monument is easily viewed from the road so there’s no entry fee.
    What you see here is a very large, solid circular structure. Mock Corinthian columns run around its girth and a decorative frieze runs around the top. It was hard to make out much of the frieze details from ground level, but I later learnt that it shows scenes from the life of Dionysus, god of theatre.
    At the very top is a large acanthus-like decoration and a copy of the bronze trophy, which was the prize won by Lysikrates and his play.
    Written October 30, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • chickandbeast
    Southgate, Canada8,728 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Very interesting site with a specific purpose apparently marriage and culture were very important, kind of like a finishing school.
    Written July 6, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mairwen1
    United Kingdom10,825 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Built in 11BC, the Gate of Athena Archegetis is still the main entrance to the Roman Agora. Even today, we still passed under the architrave and between the four soaring columns to enter the agora.
    The gate, combined with the Tower of the Winds, is one of the two highlights inside the agora grounds.
    We looked out for a curious engraving on one of the gate’s door jambs. Here you can see an order from the Roman emperor, Hadrian which deals with olive oil and regulating the sale of it. At first it seemed like such an incongruous thing - a Roman emperor taking the time to have a notice about a very ordinary, everyday household staple, carved on this very imposing and grand gateway.
    However this was a working market and the city’s commercial centre and olive oil was very big business in ancient Athens.
    According to the decree, all oil producers had to hand over a third of the production in taxes. This wasn’t as draconian as it sounds and was instead aimed at safeguarding the city’s supplies so that that it didn’t run out of the valuable oil. It’s quite a long inscription and he goes on to talk of other things as well.
    It’s worth noting that you can see the gate (and most of the tower) from outside so you don’t need to pay €8 to go in. It is kind of expensive for what is a small site, especially one that can largely be seen from the roadside.
    However I’d highly recommend buying the combo ticket. At €30, it is excellent value and includes entry to the Roman Agora as well as the Ancient Agora, the Acropolis and 4 other sites. Entry to the Acropolis on its own is €20 so if it is your first time to Athens, it makes sense to buy this ticket (unless you’re here in winter when many sites are half price).
    Written October 30, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • permia
    Ireland61,913 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A cult of Zeus Freedom was formed in 489 BCE when the Persians were dispatched from Greece after the battle of Plataia.

    Unusually, for a building to a God it took the form of, not a Temple, but a colonnaded Stoa. A form normally used for civic purposes.

    Originating from around 425 BCE it featured grand Doric columns on the exterior while those within had the Ionic style.

    It was embellished with paintings by the famous 4th century BCE artist Euphranor and shields of warriors who died for the freedom of Athens were displayed.

    Interestingly it is said that Socrates frequented the complex.
    Written August 23, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mairwen1
    United Kingdom10,825 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    These temple ruins are one of the sights within the grounds of the Acropolis. If like us, you enter through the south gate, then you will go right past it when you walk between the more well known sights of the Theatre of Dionysus and the Odeon.
    What you see here are three large standing columns and lintel and the remains of solid stone foundation blocks.
    Founded in 420/19 BC, the temple was like a modern day medical centre (although it was more ‘healing centre’ than hospital).
    At a time well before antibiotics and Panadol, diseases were sent by the gods and Asclepius, the god of medicine, was your only hope of a cure.
    Those who were sick came here, bringing offerings and prayers. They were given a purifying bath, then prepped for treatment which included purging, fasting, massages, offerings and even animal sacrifices. This was done in readiness for the final treatment in the ‘abaton’, the area where ‘patients’ were given an hallucinogen and fell asleep, hoping that Asclepius would come to them in their dreams. Meanwhile, snakes slithered around the rooms. Odd as this last bit sounded, the snake was sacred to Asclepius and the snake twisting around staff is still our symbol for medicine today. In the best case scanario, Asclepius would either cure them completely while they slept or at the very least, would offer advice for healing.
    At other Asclepeion temples, scalpels, lances and medical instruments have been uncovered so the priests must have also carried out surgical treatment sometimes.
    This is one of the smaller sites at the Acropolis and whilst it was interesting to read the information board, there is so much to see that we didn’t linger here.
    TICKET TIP: I’d highly recommend buying the combo ticket. At €30, it is excellent value. It lasts for 5 days and includes entry to 7 ancient sites. Entry to the Acropolis on its own is €20 so if it is your first time to Athens, it makes sense to buy this ticket (unless you’re here in winter when many sites are half price).
    Written November 22, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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