Specialty Museums in Florence

THE 10 BEST Florence Specialty Museums

Specialty Museums in Florence

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What travelers are saying

  • Marisse M
    Wrexham, UK161 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    At the time we arrived, 10.30 am on a Friday, there was hardly any queue and we bought our combined tickets for the Pitti Palace and Boboli gardens at E22 per person. We were glad we did this, because it would have been an extra 3 euros each if we had reserved tickets. There are different sections of art rooms on different floors. The Palatine gallery was packed full of ornate pictures, decorative frescos and statues so overwhelming, we couldn't take it all in. Many paintings were skipped with a cursory glance. I loved looking at all the decorative ceilings. We then went to the modern art section and this seemed to be quite interesting in a different way with more disguisable and familiar scenes. The final section was a collection of costumes which should not be missed. The Boboli gardens are massive and you need comfortable footwear to walk everywhere. There are also several statues and water features within it. We wish we had taken a picnic.
    Written May 20, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Brad
    Hong Kong, China173,427 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is a wonderful museum found within the convent section of the Basilica di San Marco at the piazza by the same name. Opening hours are 8.15am to 1.50pm daily (closed on Tuesdays) and entry is now €11 per adult. You can book online in advance or pay at the entrance on the day you intend to visit. We visited around 8.30am recently and found no queue upon arrival.

    The convent history dates back to the 12th-century. However, what you see today is much to do with expansion works by Italian architect Michelozzo in the 15th-century. Importantly, the museum is noted for its remarkable collection works by Italian Renaissance Master Fra. Angelico. You'll see numerous highlights including The Annunciation in the upstairs dormitory section of the museum. This is probably one of the most recognisable early Renaissance artworks in the world. There are sections of the museum dedicated to famed preacher Savonarola and a fresco lined outdoor cloister amongst other interesting things to see within Museo San Marco. Best to allow at minimum 1 hour and considerably longer if you are a particular fan of Fra Angelico works.

    Note: While the convent and cloister require ticked entry. The church at Basilica di San Marco is free to visit. It can be entered directly through the Baroque style church entrance directly on the square. Given the limited morning opening house, I'd suggest visiting the museum first and the church second.
    Written April 6, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alecruces
    Concepcion, Chile13 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is a very nice place to know Leonardo Da Vinci creations and how did they work. But this is a small place, and tranlated explanations are bad, at least to Spanish. However I recommend to go and understand some ingeneering problems.
    Written December 27, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • R K L
    Seattle, WA3,746 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Palazzo Vecchio was itself the actual museum. We first endured the crowds to view the free open-air exhibits outside the medieval structure, which had served as the Florence town hall. Upon paying the museum entry fee, we thankfully were able to leave the frenzied masses outside and leisurely stroll the stunning rooms and marvel at the magnificent works of art. It was impossible not to have been awestruck by the beauty which surrounded us. The wall frescoes were amazing, the ceilings simply gorgeous, and the views of Florence were worth the climb.
    Written May 19, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Tourist797084
    5 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Small but a very charming little museum, included on PassePartout. Not a museum of geology but of art made from semi precious stones. Very impressive, and interesting to watch how they are made.
    Written October 20, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Olivia B
    21 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A lovely traditional house, furnished mostly as it would have been in the 15th century - the painted walls are amazing, and there is quite a bit to see although the top floor wasn’t open on the day of our visit. No queue, and although we had reserved tickets, you could probably have just turned up - a refreshing change from other Florence museums. Well worth a visit
    Written April 29, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Michele
    Zurich, Switzerland126 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    It is a good place to spend half an afternoon and learn in a hands on way about Leonardo‘s inventions. The museum has two rooms full of his machines and they can all be touched to understand the system behind which is kinda cool! Only problem is that it gets full, loud and crowded with kids fairly fast
    Written December 9, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Gary T
    Tel Aviv, Israel226 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful building inside and out.
    The museums exhibits are simple but show Judaica and explain about the history of Florence Jews.
    Written May 5, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Geminican
    San Jose, CA2,101 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    In Italy, there are countless precious artworks in all forms. They can be fragile or vulnerable to human breathe. The Last Supper by Da Vinci is an example. The fact that the Italians choose to share and open for visitation so that visitors like you and I should not be taken for granted. A lot of them may be undergoing renovation and restoration so they may be closed. They may also occasionally open new things to public that may surprise you in different ways. For this reason, personally I treat encounters with these objects or artworks as once in a lifetime opportunity. They are precious, but you don't know if you will be able to see them again and again due to various reasons.

    When you have an opportunity to see precious artwork like this, sometimes requires more work, but it's worth it.
    More work means either making reservations in advance or long wait time or fees or physical energy.
    Because Italy has so many attractions that fall into "popular" category, planning ahead definitely helps, but also be aware of additional effort required to.

    This one falls into this description.

    More work in this case: Making advance reservations isn't easy for visitors less than 10 people, literally impossible. They also are not responsive to email inquiries. Their online reservation system is difficult. The online information can be confusing too. I made so many inquires including filling out its webform and still got me nowhere. That's the very reason I am giving it a 4 instead of a 5 out of 5.

    Thankfully, there is a workaround. You must go there in person, ask them at the ticket counter. They will share with you their upcoming guided tour in Italian and English for the day. If they have space available, you can make reservations and obtain tickets on spot. More administrative work. If they don't have availability, they may be able to help you find tickets for future dates. Please work with the ticket office staff to sort it out. The entire team there are nice and helpful. Most speak good English.

    To see this place, you must join a guided tour offered by them. There is no other ways to do it. The maximum group size is capped at 10-15 or so.
    They do charge a fee.

    Once you have gotten your ticket, then it's a smooth sailing towards the end.

    They would give you an overview in a presentation room.
    The frescos are in two levels. They thoughtfully built a scaffold so you could see these artworks at eye level, up close. The actual artwork is located on the 2nd and 3rd level. They give you 15 minutes on each level. Once 15 minutes is up, please respect their instruction and leave the current level to the other one. Once you are done seeing both levels, you are directed back to the ticket office area. That's the end of the tour.

    There is no elevator, you must be able to climb stairs from the ground level up to three story high, if you can't, please do not sign up.

    I personally suggest and recommend that you wear a mask to reduce human breath damaging artwork. But this is not mandatory when I was there.

    This place is worth visiting. Highly recommend.

    Good luck with making advanced reservations and getting tickets.
    Written November 18, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Brun066
    Florence, Italy13,099 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    In addition to the Certosa del Galluzzo (which I visited for the second time after many years) I have experience of some other Italian Carthusian monasteries, more or less famous: Pavia, Naples, Padula, Calci, Pontignano near Siena. In none of these have I been able to take advantage of a guided tour so complete and so easy to practice (but I haven't been from Pavia for decades, so things could have gotten much better there): summer and winter, every day of the week except Mondays, visits are possible at set times by accessing at the moment, without reservation (I don't know if, by reservation, guided tours are also possible in other languages).
    This admirable service is due to the so-called "Community of San Leolino": a mixed community of lay people and religious, whose institutional seat is at the Pieve di San Leolino (Panzano, hamlet of the municipality of Greve in Chianti) and which was commissioned by Archbishop of Florence to administer the abbey after the departure of the last (Cistercian) monks in 2017.
    This way, the peculiarity of the abbey can be fully known: the visit (included in the entrance ticket, at a fair price of 5 euros) lasts almost an hour and a half, and concerns all the practicable parts of the abbey (therefore, for example, not the dungeons).
    The visitor is thus able to get to know the peculiarities of the attraction: the story of Niccolò Acciaioli, rich and influential Florentine merchant, founder of the Certosa, is illustrated. The precious frescoes by Pontormo are illustrated in depth, executed in 1523 in some arches of the larger cloister of the Certosa, and now brought to the building called "Palazzo Acciaioli". The frescoes are partly ruined by time, but in my opinion they have acquired a new charm through the white surfaces that have replaced the lost colors. The harsh discipline of the Carthusian monks is illustrated, as the distinction between full-fledged cloistered monks and the so-called "conversi" who can have links with the rest of the world: a distinction that is reflected among other things in that of the two juxtaposed churches, for cloistered and not. You can appreciate the fascinating succession of cloisters (three) from the smallest to the largest, which also here follows the rigorous architectural rule of the order founded by San Bruno of Cologne. You can visit one of the monks' cells, large and airy, also equipped with a personal garden, which somehow compensated them for their hard life of penance. You can admire the choir stalls in the cloistered church, with their precious inlays.
    At the end, the visitor enjoys the satisfaction coming from having fully understood (as far as possible for a non-specialist) the functioning not only of this "machine" of penance and industriousness, but of all similar ones, scattered around the Europe.
    Written December 20, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Steve D
    Portsmouth, UK352 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    We were looking to do something a little different during our time in Florence and this ticked all of those boxes.

    Situated at the back of Piazza della Signoria, we had a short walk having visited the Palazzo Vecchio and the Uffizi Gallery, and there was no need to pre-book the tickets.

    Really enjoyed the exhibits which have been put together really well apart from the film that was being played in what I would describe as a mini cinema. We thought the film would be a brief history of Gucci but was anything but and just a bit weird.

    Other than that a decent way to spend an hour or so.
    Written May 19, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • diBiella51
    New York City, NY325 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Firenze is our favorite city in Italy. We’ve been there several times - 4days, then a week, next a month and most recently for two weeks. Can never get enough of Firenze and always something new to explore.
    Away from the crowds but on the Oltrano this museum was not crowded but has much to offer. We spent two enjoyable hours here.
    Written March 12, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • wendyb11934
    North Adams, MA149 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Tucked away in the San Salvi chapel in a quiet area of Florence and well worth the trip to find it. Also in the same chapel are many other fine paintings including a few by a nun. The visit was delightfully quiet.
    Written March 22, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Michael U
    Las Vegas, NV45,918 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Located in the basement of Ferragamo's Florence flagship this museum tells the story of its patriarch through a collection of photos and fashion including iconic shoes worn by A-list celebrities. About 15 Euro per person to enter, guests will learn about the thought process and technology employed to establish a global brand, plus some details about Ferragamo and his family. Expect to spend 1-2 hours.
    Written May 24, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Harry G
    Liverpool, UK167 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Worth a visit. Welcome diversion for children in Florence. Aged 4 and 6, there is only so much culture they can handle! Only 13 euro for family ticket and pretended half the exhibits were dinosaurs!
    Written August 9, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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